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  • 1.
    Chudinova, Ekaterina
    et al.
    Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russia.
    Surmeneva, Maria
    Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russia.
    Koptyug, Andrey
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Skoglund, Per
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Sharanova, A
    Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russia.
    Loza, K
    University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany.
    Epple, M
    University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany.
    Surmenev, Roman
    Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russia.
    Hydroxyapatite coating and silver nanoparticles assemblies on additively manufactured Ti6Al4V scaffolds2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Cronskär, Marie
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Bäckström, Mikael
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Modeling of fractured clavicles and reconstruction plates using CAD, finite element analysis and real musculoskeletal forces input2013In: WIT Transactions on Biomedicine and Health, WIT Press, 2013, p. 235-243Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on the treatment options for clavicle fractures, more specifically the cases with a need for internal fixation: non-unions and some complex fractures. Enhancing the understanding of the loading of the bone and fixation device enables treatment options to be improved. The aim of the study was to develop a method for the realistic simulation of stresses and displacements in the bone and fixation device and to use this method to make comparisons between a conventional reconstruction plate and a customized plate, designed from patient-specific computed tomography (CT) data. In an earlier study, a finite element (FE) mesh of the clavicle geometry was created from CT data, subjected to muscle forces and other boundary conditions from a multibody musculoskeletal model and imported into the FE solver. In this study, a solid 3D model of the same clavicle geometry was created and the mesh was replaced by the solid model to make the FE-model more suitable for the comparison of different plates. An LCP Reco-Plate 3.5 straight, 6 holes (by Synthes) was compared with a customized plate which was designed to follow the anatomy of the bone. The LCP-Reco plate has tapered reconstruction segments throughout the plate to allow for the plate reshaping during surgery. The customized plate was designed without such segments and with a lower width than the LCP plate. The two different plates showed stresses and displacements of similar magnitudes. The customized plate had a more even stress distribution while the LCP plate had higher stress concentrations in the middle of the plate and on the edges of the tapered reconstruction segments. To the authors' best knowledge, this is the first FE model of a clavicle bone with plate and it may, upon further development, serve as a useful instrument for improved clavicle fixation.

  • 3.
    Cronskär, Marie
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Rännar, Lars-Erik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Bäckström, Mikael
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Implementation of digital design and solid free-form fabrication for customization of implants in trauma orthopaedics2012In: Journal of medical and biological engineering, ISSN 1609-0985, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 91-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bone plates for the fixation of complex fractures in proximity to joints often have to be reshaped to follow the bone contour. Good adhesion of the screws in areas where the bone is osteoporotic is also a challenge. One possible solution to these issues is to tailor-make plates by creating a digital three-dimensional model of the fracture from a computed tomography (CT) scan, digitally reducing the fracture, designing a plate, and finally manufacturing it directly from the digital model with solid free-form fabrication (SFF) technology. This study designs a custom plate for a distal tibia fracture, and investigates and refines the procedure from the CT scan to the final implant, with the aim of making it usable in trauma orthopaedics. The bone plate is manufactured using electron beam melting (EBM) technology. The challenges of bone plate design using digitalization and SFF are discussed. The virtual models created by the engineer while digitally reducing the fracture and modeling the plate are valuable for the physician while planning the surgery. A combination of surgery planning and digital plate design improves the surgeon's preparations and ensures correspondence between the plan and the designed implant. The proposed procedure, with the approximate required time in brackets, includes the separation of bone in the DICOM file (60 min), the reduction of fracture (5-30 min), revision (30 min), modelling of the plate (30-120 min), confirmation (30 min), manufacturing with SFF (10 h), post-processing (60 min), and finally cleaning and sterilization (90 min). The whole procedure requires about three working days.

  • 4.
    Douglas, T
    et al.
    LANCASTER UNIVERSITY, UK.
    Hempel, U
    INSTITUTE OF PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY, TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITÄT DRESDEN, GERMANY.
    Żydek, J
    AGH UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, KRAKOW, POLAND.
    Buchweitz, M
    TOMSK POLYTECHNIC UNIVERSITY, RUSSIA.
    Surmenev, Roman
    Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russia.
    Surmeneva, Maria
    Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russia.
    Koptioug, Andrey
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics. SportsTech Research Centre, Mid Sweden University.
    Pamula, E
    AGH UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, KRAKOW, POLAND.
    Pectin Coatings on Titanium Alloy Samples Produced by Additive Manufacturing: Promotion of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Proliferation2017In: Engineering of Biomaterials, ISSN 1429-7248, Vol. 143, p. 43-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Etehad Tavakol, Mahnaz
    et al.
    Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Fatemi, Alimohammad
    Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Karbalaie, Abdolamir
    KTH, Hälso- och systemvetenskap.
    Emrani, Zahra
    Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Erlandsson, Björn-Erik
    KTH, Systemsäkerhet och organisation.
    Nailfold Capillaroscopy in Rheumatic Diseases: Which Parameters Should Be Evaluated?2015In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, Vol. 2015, article id 974530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Video nailfold capillaroscopy (NFC), considered as an extension of the widefield technique, allows a more accurate measuring andstoring of capillary data and a better defining, analyzing, and quantifying of capillary abnormalities. Capillaroscopic study is oftenperformed on the patients suspected of having microcirculation problems such as Raynaud’s phenomenon as the main indicationfor nailfold capillaroscopy. Capillaroscopic findings based on microcirculation studies can provide useful information in the fieldsof pathophysiology, differential diagnosis, and monitoring therapy. Nailfold capillaroscopy provides a vital assessment in clinicalpractices and research; for example, its reputation in the early diagnosis of systemic sclerosis is well established and it is also usedas a classification criterion in this regard. This review focuses on the manner of performing video nailfold capillaroscopy and on acommon approach for measuring capillary dimensions in fingers and toes.

  • 6.
    Henriksson, Anders E.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences. Sundsvall Cty Hosp, Dept Lab Med, SE-85186 Sundsvall, Sweden.
    S100B and the influence of seasonal variation2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 76, no 4, p. 338-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background A blood test for S100B can be used to rule out intracranial complications after minor head injury and thereby reduce the need for computed tomography (CT) examinations. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical importance of a possible influence of seasonal variation on S100B. Methods The individual seasonal variation of S100B in 69 healthy volunteers living at latitudes with extremely variable seasonal exposure to sunlight was investigated. Results The mean serum concentration of S100B was 13% higher in August than in February, but however, not statistically significant (p = 0.068). A good agreement between summer and winter S100B values was confirmed by Bland-Altman analysis and a significant correlation (r = 0.317, p = 0.008) was shown between summer and winter S100B values. Conclusion This study did not show any clinical importance of seasonal variation of S100B that may influence the decision of CT scanning patients with head injuries.

  • 7.
    Huo, Jinxing
    et al.
    Division of Applied Mechanics, Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Derand, Per
    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Rännar, Lars-Erik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Hirsch, Jan-Michael
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Uppsala University Sweden.
    Gamstedt, E. Kristofer
    Division of Applied Mechanics, Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Failure location prediction by finite element analysis for an additive manufactured mandible implant2015In: Medical Engineering & Physics, ISSN 1350-4533, Vol. 37, no 9, p. 862-869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to reconstruct a patient with a bone defect in the mandible, a porous scaffold attached to a plate, both in a titanium alloy, was designed and manufactured using additive manufacturing. Regrettably, the implant fractured in vivo several months after surgery. The aim of this study was to investigate the failure of the implant and show a way of predicting the mechanical properties of the implant before surgery. All computed tomography data of the patient were preprocessed to remove metallic artefacts with metal deletion technique before mandible geometry reconstruction. The three-dimensional geometry of the patient's mandible was also reconstructed, and the implant was fixed to the bone model with screws in Mimics medical imaging software. A finite element model was established from the assembly of the mandible and the implant to study stresses developed during mastication. The stress distribution in the load-bearing plate was computed, and the location of main stress concentration in the plate was determined. Comparison between the fracture region and the location of the stress concentration shows that finite element analysis could serve as a tool for optimizing the design of mandible implants.

  • 8.
    Högberg, Cecilia
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Unit of Clinical Research Centre - Östersund, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Karling, Pontus
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine/Gastroenterology, Umeå University, Sweden .
    Rutegård, Jörgen
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, Sweden .
    Lilja, Mikael
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Unit of Clinical Research Centre - Östersund, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Ljung, Thomas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Immunochemical faecal occult blood tests in primary care and the risk of delay in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 209-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To evaluate the value, risks, and shortcomings of immunochemical faecal occult blood tests (iFOBTs) in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) and adenomas with high-grade dysplasia (HGD) in patients initially presenting to primary care. Design. A retrospective population-based study. Setting and subjects. All 495 cases of CRC and adenomas with HGD diagnosed in the county of Jamtland, Sweden from 2005 to 2009. Results. Of 495 patients 323 (65%) initially presented to primary care. IFOBTs were performed in 215 of 323 (67%) patients. The sensitivity of iFOBT for CRC and adenomas with HGD was 88% (83% when patients with a history of rectal bleeding were excluded). Of 34 patients with anaemia found en passant, 10 had negative iFOBTs. Time to diagnosis was longer for patients with negative iFOBTs (p < 0.0005). Conclusion. IFOBT might be helpful in selecting which patients to refer for colonoscopy. However, iFOBT has a limited sensitivity as a diagnostic test for CRC and adenomas with HGD. Relying only on iFOBT for colonoscopy referral could delay diagnosis, especially for patients with anaemia found en passant.

  • 9.
    Kelmendi, Vjollca
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Kellah, Hawa
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Tonåringars upplevelser av diabetes typ 12009Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 10.
    Koptyug, Andrey
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Rännar, Lars-Erik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Backstrom, Mikael
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Klingvall, Rebecca
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Electron Beam Melting: Moving from Macro- to Micro- and Nanoscale2012In: Materials Science Forum, Switzerland: Trans Tech Publications Inc., 2012, Vol. 706-709, p. 532-537Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents some results achieved in the biomedical applications of the EBM® technology, and describes the resolved and unresolved challenges presented by modern medical implant manufacturing. In particular it outlines the issues related to the cellular structure design and metal surface modification. Moving to precision control of the metal surface at a microand sub-micrometer scale is a serious challenge to the EBM® processing, because it uses the powder with average grain size of about 0.04 to 0.1 mm. Though manufacturing of components with solidmesh geometry and porous surfaces using EBM® is quite possible, post- processing (for example chemical or electrochemical) is needed to achieve desired control of the surface at smaller scales to realize full potential of the technology for biomedical applications.

  • 11.
    Persson, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Helgason, Benedikt
    Institute for Biomechanics, Zürich, Switzerland.
    Engqvist, Håkan
    Uppsala universitet.
    Ferguson, Stephen J.
    Institute for Biomechanics, Zürich, Switzerland.
    Persson, Cecilia
    Uppsala universitet.
    Stiffness and strength of cranioplastic implant systems in comparison to cranial bone2018In: Journal of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 1010-5182, E-ISSN 1878-4119, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 418-423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate skull replacement options after decompressive craniectomy by systematically investigating which combination of geometrical properties and material selection would result in a mechanical response comparable in stiffness to that of native skull bone and a strength as high or higher than the same.

    Materials and methods: The study was conducted using a Finite Element Model of the top part of a human skull. Native skull bone, autografts and commercial implants made of PEEK, solid titanium, two titanium meshes and a titanium-ceramic composite were modeled under a set load to evaluate deformation and maximum stress.

    Results: The computational result showed a large variation of the strength and effective stiffness of the autografts and implants. The stiffness of native bone varied by a factor of 20 and the strength by a factor of eight. The implants span the entire span of the native skull, both in stiffness and strength.

    Conclusion: All the investigated implant materials had a potential for having the same effective stiffness as the native skull bone. All the materials also had the potential to be as strong as the native bone. To match inherent properties, the best choice of material and thickness is thus patient specific, depending on the quality of the patient’s native bone.

  • 12.
    Popov, Vladimir V., Jr.
    et al.
    Technion R&D Fdn, Haifa, Israel.
    Muller-Kamskii, Gary
    Technion R&D Fdn, Haifa, Israel.
    Katz-Demyanetz, Alexander
    Technion R&D Fdn, Haifa, Israel.
    Kovalevsky, Aleksey
    Technion R&D Fdn, Haifa, Israel.
    Usov, Stas
    Vet Clin Orthovet, St Petersburg, Russia.
    Trofimcow, Dmitrii
    Vet Clin Beliy Klyk, Moscow, Russia.
    Dzhenzhera, Georgy
    Polygon Med Engn, Moscow, Russia.
    Koptioug, Andrei
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Additive manufacturing to veterinary practice: recovery of bony defects after the osteosarcoma resection in canines2019In: BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING LETTERS, ISSN 2093-9868, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 97-108Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper outlines the achievements and challenges in the additive manufacturing (AM) application to veterinary practice. The state-of-the-art in AM application to the veterinary surgery is presented, with the focus of AM for patient-specific implants manufacturing. It also provides critical discussion on some of the potential issues design and technology should overcome for wider and more effective implementation of additively manufactured parts in veterinary practices. Most of the discussions in present paper are related to the metallic implants, manufactured in this case using so-called powder bed additive manufacturing (PB-AM) in titanium alloy Ti-6AL-4V, and to the corresponding process of their design, manufacturing and implementation in veterinary surgery. Procedures of the implant design and individualization for veterinary surgery are illustrated basing on the four performed surgery cases with dog patients. Results of the replacement surgery in dogs indicate that individualized additively manufactured metallic implants significantly increase chances for successful recovery process, and AM techniques present a viable alternative to amputation in a large number of veterinary cases. The same time overcoming challenges of implant individualization in veterinary practice significantly contributes to the knowledge directly relevant to the modern medical practice. An experience from veterinary cases where organ-preserving surgery with 3D-printed patient-specific implants is performed provides a unique opportunity for future development of better human implants.

  • 13.
    Surmenev, Roman
    et al.
    Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russia.
    Surmeneva, Maria
    Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russia.
    Chudinova, Ekaterina
    Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russia.
    Koptioug, Andrei
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Melnikova, E.S.
    Skoglund, Per
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Prymak, O.
    Epple, M.
    Wittmar, A.
    Ulbricht, M
    Surface modification of additive manufactured titanium with CaP, Ag nanoparticles and ultrathin HA coating2016In: Proceedings BIOMAH-2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Surmeneva, Maria
    et al.
    Tomsk Polytechnic University, Institute of Physics and Technologies, Lenina ave., 30, Tomsk, Russian Federation .
    Chudinova, Ekaterina
    Tomsk Polytechnic University, Institute of Physics and Technologies, Lenina ave., 30, Tomsk, Russian Federation .
    Syrtanov, M
    Tomsk Polytechnic University, Institute of Physics and Technologies, Lenina ave., 30, Tomsk, Russian Federation .
    Koptyug, Andrey
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Surmenev, Roman
    Tomsk Polytechnic University, Institute of Physics and Technologies, Lenina ave., 30, Tomsk, Russian Federation .
    Investigation of the HA film deposited on the porous Ti6Al4V alloy prepared via additive manufacturing2015In: IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering, IOP, 2015, Vol. 98, p. Art. no. 012025-, article id 012025Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is focused on the use of radio frequency magnetron sputtering to modify the surface of porous Ti6Al4V alloy fabricated via additive manufacturing technology. The hydroxyapatite (HA) coated porous Ti6Al4V alloy was studied in respect with its chemical and phase composition, surface morphology, water contact angle and hysteresis, and surface free energy. Thin nanocrystalline HA film was deposited while its structure with diamond-shaped cells remained unchanged. Hysteresis and water contact angle measurements revealed an effect of the deposited HA films, namely an increased water contact angle and contact angle hysteresis. The increase of the contact angle of the coating-substrate system compared to the uncoated substrate was attributed to the multiscale structure of the resulted surfaces.

  • 15.
    Vladescu, Alina
    et al.
    National Institute for Optoelectronics, Romania; National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin Avenue 43, Tomsk, Russian Federation.
    Vranceanu, Diana
    University Politehnica of Bucharest, Romania.
    Kulesza, Slawek
    Warmia and Mazury University in Olsztyn, Poland.
    Ivanov, Alexey
    Scientific Research Institute of Traumatology, Orthopedics and Neurosurgery, Russia.
    Bramowicz, Mirosław
    Warmia and Mazury University in Olsztyn, Poland.
    Fedonnikov, Alexander
    Scientific Research Institute of Traumatology, Orthopedics and Neurosurgery, Russia.
    Braic, Mariana
    National Institute for Optoelectronics, Romania.
    Norkin, Igor
    Scientific Research Institute of Traumatology, Orthopedics and Neurosurgery, Russia.
    Koptioug, Andrei
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Kurtukova, Maria O.
    Saratov State Medical University, Russia.
    Dinu, Mihaela
    National Institute for Optoelectronics, Romania.
    Pana, Iulian
    National Institute for Optoelectronics, Romania.
    Surmeneva, Maria
    Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russia.
    Surmenev, Roman A.
    Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russia.
    Cotrut, Cosmin M.
    University Politehnica of Bucharest, Romania; Natl Res Tomsk Polytech Univ, Tomsk, Russia.
    Influence of the electrolyte’s pH on the properties of electrochemically deposited hydroxyapatite coating on additively manufactured Ti64 alloy2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 16819Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Properties of the hydroxyapatite obtained by electrochemical assisted deposition (ED) are dependenton several factors including deposition temperature, electrolyte pH and concentrations, appliedpotential. All of these factors directly influence the morphology, stoichiometry, crystallinity,electrochemical behaviour, and particularly the coating thickness. Coating structure together withsurface micro- and nano-scale topography significantly influence early stages of the implant biointegration.The aim of this study is to analyse the effect of pH modification on the morphology,corrosion behaviour and in vitro bioactivity and in vivo biocompatibility of hydroxyapatite preparedby ED on the additively manufactured Ti64 samples. The coatings prepared in the electrolytes withpH = 6 have predominantly needle like morphology with the dimensions in the nanometric scale(~30 nm). Samples coated at pH = 6 demonstrated higher protection efficiency against the corrosiveattack as compared to the ones coated at pH = 5 (~93% against 89%). The in vitro bioactivity resultsindicated that both coatings have a greater capacity of biomineralization, compared to the uncoatedTi64. Somehow, the coating deposited at pH = 6 exhibited good corrosion behaviour and highbiomineralization ability. In vivo subcutaneous implantation of the coated samples into the white rats for up to 21 days with following histological studies showed no serious inflammatory process.

  • 16. Vranceanu, D.M.
    et al.
    Koptioug, Andrei
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Vladescu, Alina
    Braic, M
    Surmenev, Roman
    Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russia.
    Surmeneva, Maria
    Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russia.
    Berbecaru, A
    Cotrut, Cosmin
    Biofunctionalization of porous Ti6Al4V with HAp coatings obtained by electrochemical assisted deposition2016In: Proc. 7 th International Conference “Biomaterials, Tissue Engineering & Medical Devices” BIOMMEDD’2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Zhang, Renyun
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Örtegren, Jonas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olsen, Martin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Harvesting triboelectricity from the human body using non-electrode triboelectric nanogenerators2018In: Nano Energy, ISSN 2211-2855, E-ISSN 2211-3282, Vol. 45, p. 298-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Triboelectrification has been known and discussed since antiquity. Triboelectrification occurs in the human body due to friction between human skin and other materials such as clothing. However, charges on the body have not been harvested to power small electronics. Here, we report for the first time that the electricity generated on the human body due to triboelectrification can be measured and harvested using human body-based non-electrode triboelectric nanogenerators (H-TENGs). The H-TENGs can have an output of up to 3.3 W/m(2) and can spontaneously harvest energy from several people. The functions of the human body in the H-TENGs are analyzed and experimentally proven to be those of a triboelectric material, conductor and capacitor. Our results demonstrate that the triboelectricity generated on a human body can be harvested using H-TENGs and provide scientific insights into body functions that will promote further studies of TENGs.

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