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  • 1.
    Forrester, Gillian S.
    et al.
    Univ Westminster, Fac Sci & Technol, Dept Psychol, London W1W 6UW, England.
    Rodriguez, Alina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology. Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Fac Med, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, London W2 1PG, England.
    Slip of the tongue: Implications for evolution and language development2015In: Cognition, ISSN 0010-0277, E-ISSN 1873-7838, Vol. 141, p. 103-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A prevailing theory regarding the evolution of language implicates a gestural stage prior to the emergence of speech. In support of a transition of human language from a gestural to a vocal system, articulation of the hands and the tongue are underpinned by overlapping left hemisphere dominant neural regions. Behavioral studies demonstrate that human adults perform sympathetic mouth actions in imitative synchrony with manual actions. Additionally, right-handedness for precision manual actions in children has been correlated with the typical development of language, while a lack of hand bias has been associated with psychopathology. It therefore stands to reason that sympathetic mouth actions during fine precision motor action of the hands may be lateralized. We employed a fine-grained behavioral coding paradigm to provide the first investigation of tongue protrusions in typically developing 4-year old children. Tongue protrusions were investigated across a range of cognitive tasks that required varying degrees of manual action: precision motor action, gross motor action and no motor actions. The rate of tongue protrusions was influenced by the motor requirements of the task and tongue protrusions were significantly right-biased for only precision manual motor action (p < .001). From an evolutionary perspective, tongue protrusions can drive new investigations regarding how an early human communication system transitioned from hand to mouth. From a developmental perspective, the present study may serve to reveal patterns of tongue protrusions during the motor development of typically developing children. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    Schulte, Stefanie
    et al.
    Institute of Motor Control and Movement Technique, German Sport University Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
    Schiffer, Thorsten
    Institute of Motor Control and Movement Technique, German Sport University Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
    Sperlich, Billy
    Institute of Training Science and Sport Informatics, German Sport University Cologne, Germany.
    Kleinöder, Heinz
    Institute of Training Science and Sport Informatics, German Sport University Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
    Holmberg, Hans-Christer
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Serum Concentrations of S100B are not Affected by Cycling to Exhaustion With or Without Vibration2011In: Journal of Human Kinetics, ISSN 1640-5544, E-ISSN 1899-7562, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 67-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The calcium-binding protein S100B is produced primarily by astrocytes and exerts concentration-dependentparacrine and autocrine effects on neurons and glia. The numerous findings of a correlation between S100B andtraumatic brain injury (TBI) have resulted in the employment of this protein as a clinical biomarker for such injury.Our present aim was to determine whether cycling with (V) or without (NV) vibration alters serum concentrations ofS100B. Twelve healthy, male non-smokers (age: 25.3±1.6 yrs, body mass: 74.2±5.9 kg, body height: 181.0±3.7 cm,VO2peak: 56.9±5.1 ml·min-1·kg-1(means ± SD)) completed in random order two separate trials to exhaustion on avibrating bicycle (amplitude 4 mm and frequency 20 Hz) connected to an ergometer. The initial workload of 100 W waselevated by 50 W every 5 min and the mean maximal period of exercise was 25:27±1:30 min. The S100B in venousblood taken at rest, immediately after the test, and 30, 60 and 240 min post-exercise exhibited no significant differences(p>0.05), suggesting that cycling with and without vibration does not influence this parameter.

  • 3.
    Sukhovey, Yurij G.
    et al.
    Institute of Clinical Immunology, Siberian Division of Russian Academy of Sciences, Tyumen, Russia.
    Koptyug, Andrey
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics. SportsTech Research Centre, Mid Sweden University.
    Fisher, Tatjana A.
    Tyumen Research Centre, Siberian Division of Russian Academy of Sciences, Tyumen, Russia.
    Petrov, Sergey A.
    Tyumen State Oil and Gas Institute, Volodarskogo st. 38, , 625000, Tyumen, .
    Dotsenko, Evgenij L.
    Tyumen State University, Semakova st. 10, 625003, Tyumen, Russia.
    Functional Conjugation of the Different Regulatory Responses to the Stress Stimuli in Healthy Human Subjects2016In: Open Journal of Applied Sciences, ISSN 2165-3917, Vol. 6, p. 489-500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Present article discusses the physiological mechanisms of the state employees adaptation duringactive training in temporary groups. It is suggested that adaptive mechanisms to adverse effectsmay be studied basing on the concept of functional isomorphism of the psychic and immune systems.Adaptive mechanisms were studied through the monitoring of the stress factors’ impact upon thelaw enforcement officers when training outside the places of permanent deployment. The specificpurpose of present study was to evaluate the physiological indicators of the psychic, immune andendocrine systems dynamics at different stages of adaptation of the live organism to a stressfulsituation, hoping to get better insight into possible relations between psychic and immune domains.Through monitoring of the dynamics of the endocrine and immune responses to the psychic stimuli,it was possible to correlate the stages of the stress onset to the phases of specific immune reactions.Strong correlations between the parameters characterizing activation of the psychic and immuneresponses support the hypothesis of the presence of “strong cooperation” between psychic andimmune domains. It supports earlier hypothesis that we are monitoring

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