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  • 1.
    Ashraf, Shakeel
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Mattsson, Claes
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Fondell, Mattis
    Helmholtz Zentrum, Inst Methods & Instrumentat Synchrotron Radiat Re, Berlin, Germany.
    Lindblad, Andreas
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Chem, Angstrom Lab, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Thungström, Göran
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Surface modification of SU-8 for metal/SU-8 adhesion using RF plasma treatment for application in thermopile detectors2015In: Materials Research Express, ISSN 2053-1591, Vol. 2, no 8, article id 086501Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on plasma treatment of SU-8 epoxy in order to enhance adhesive strength for metals. Its samples were fabricated on standard silicon wafers and treated with (O2 & Ar) RF plasma at a power of 25W at a low pressure of (3×10-3 torr) for different time spans (10 sec – 70 sec). The sample surfaces were characterized in terms of contact angle, surface (roughness and chemistry) and using a tape test. During the contact angle measurement, it was observed that the contact angle was reduced from 73° to 5° (almost wet) and 23° for (O2 & Ar) treated samples, respectively. The RMS surface roughness was significantly increased by 21.5% and 37.2% for (O2 & Ar) treatment, respectively. A pattern of metal squares was formed on the samples using photolithography for a tape test. An adhesive tape was applied to the samples and peeled off at 180o. The maximum adhesion results, more than 90%, were achieved for the O2-treated samples, whereas the Ar-treated samples showed no change. The XPS study shows the formation of new species in the O2-treated sample compared to the Ar-treated samples. The high adhesive results were due to the formation of hydrophilic groups and new O2 species in the O2-treated samples, which were absent in Ar-treated samples.

  • 2.
    Botero, Carlos Alberto
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Koptyug, Andrey
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Jiménez-Piqué, Emilio
    Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain.
    Rännar, Lars-Erik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Microstructure and nanomechanical behavior of modified 316L-based materials fabricated using EBM2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stainless steel 316L based materials modified by the additions of iron-based wear-resistant alloys (Colferoloy@ 103 and 139) used for thermal spray coatings applications were fabricated by EBM. Process parameters were tailored to fabricate compact specimens of 1cm3 in an Arcam A2 (Arcam AB, Mölndal, Sweden) at Mid Sweden University. Microstructural features of the materials obtained were characterized by OM and SEM in polished and etched samples. Nanoindentation tests carried out at different penetration depths were performed on selected areas of the polished specimens to evaluate the materials micro/nano mechanical behavior and to establish correlations with the observed microstructure.

  • 3.
    Botero Vega, Carlos Alberto
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Jiménez-Piqué, Emilio
    Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona.
    Roos, Stefan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Skoglund, Per
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Koptioug, Andrei
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Rännar, Lars-Erik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Bäckström, Mikael
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Nanoindentation: a suitable tool in metal Additive Manufacturing2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Koptioug, Andrei
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Bäckström, Mikael
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Rännar, Lars-Erik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    3D-printing: a future “magic wand” for global manufacturing. How can we benefit from it today for sports and health care?2017In: Proceedings of the 5th International Congress on Sport Sciences Research and Technology Support, icSPORTS / [ed] Jan Cabri, Pedro Pezarat Correia, INSTICC Press, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    3D-printing, or as it is also known, additive manufacturing (AM), is promising to be one of the determining manufacturing technologies of the present century. It is not a single technology but a family of rather different ones common in the way components are made, adding materials layer by layer. Additive manufacturing is already quite competitive to existing and well established technologies, but it also can provide unprecedented flexibility and complexity of shapes making components from the materials as different as cheese, chocolate and cream, live cells, concrete, polymers and metal. Many more materials we were not even thinking about few years ago are also becoming available in additive manufacturing, making it really believable that “only the sky is the limit”. During the time available for the keynote lecture, we will analyze the present position of AM in relation to other technologies, the features that make it so promising and its influence upon the part of our life we call sports and health, using the examples relevant to the Congress areas from computer systems to sports performance. Out of all enormities of materials available for different representatives of this manufacturing family we will concentrate at polymers and metals. AM technologies working with these two material families are already providing some unique solutions within the application areas relevant to the Congress' scope. We will also talk about some limitations inherent to the AM in polymers and metals to have the awareness that though the limit is somewhere “high in the sky”, it still exists.

  • 5. Marianne, Klaman
    et al.
    Erik, Blohm
    Per-Åke, Johansson
    Jon, Lofthus
    Viviane, Alecrim
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Jonas, Örtegren
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Hybrid printing - print quality mechanisms when offset and inkjet are combined2011In: Advances in Printing and Media Technology, Vol. XXXVIII / [ed] IARIGAI, International Association of Research Organizations for the Information, Media and Graphic Arts Industrie (IARIGAI), 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Moxell, Mattias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Svällskiffer: Vad vet vi om svällskiffer och hur åtgärdas dess negativa påverkan på bästa sätt?2013Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 7.
    Petrone, Nicola
    et al.
    University of Padova, Italy.
    Carraro, Giovanni
    University of Padova, Italy.
    Dal Castello, Stefano
    University of Padova, Italy.
    Broggio, Luca
    University of Padova, Italy.
    Koptioug, Andrei
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Bäckström, Mikael
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    A Novel Instrumented Human Head Surrogate For The Impact Evaluation Of Helmets2018In: Proceedings, Volume 2, ISEA 2018 / [ed] Dr Hugo Espinosa, David R. Rowlands, Jonathan Shepherd, Professor David Thiel, 2018, Vol. 2, p. 269-, article id 6Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel Human Head Surrogate was obtained from available MRI scans of a 50th percentile male human head. Addictive manufacturing was used to produce the skull, the brain and the skin. All original MRI geometries were partially smoothed and adjusted to provide the best biofidelity compatible with printing and molding technology. The skull was 3D-printed in ABS and ten pressure sensors were placed into it. The brain surrogate was cast from silicon rubber in the 3d-printed plastic molds. Nine tri-axial accelerometers (placed at the tops of the lobes, at the sides of the lobes, in the cerebellum and in the center of mass) and a three-axis gyroscope (at the center of mass) were inserted into the silicon brain during casting. The cranium, after assembly with brain, was filled with silicon oil mimicking the cerebral fluid. Silicon rubber was cast in additional 3d-printed molds to form the skin surrounding the cranium. The skull base was adapted to be compatible with the Hybrid-III neck and allow the exit of brain sensors cabling. Preliminary experiments were carried out proving the functionality of the surrogate. Results showed how multiple accelerometers and pressure sensors allowed a better comprehension of the head complex motion during impacts.

  • 8.
    Rännar, Lars-Erik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    On Optimization of Injection Molding Cooling2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Öhlund, Thomas
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Örtegren, Jonas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Nilsson, Hans-Erik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Sintering Methods for Metal Nanoparticle Inks on Flexible Substrates2009In: NIP 25: DIGITAL FABRICATION 2009, TECHNICAL PROGRAM AND PROCEEDINGS, The Society for Imaging Science and Technology, 2009, p. 614-617Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper a number of selective sintering methods suitable for inkjet printed nanoparticles are demonstrated on two different coated papers. The selective methods demonstrated here are electric current heating, microwave sintering and photonic curing. As a reference, conventional heat chamber sintering is also included. Conductivity measurements and studies of sintered structures with optical and scanning electron microscopy are performed, as well as a qualitative evaluation of how the heat-sensitive substrates are affected. The purpose is to analyze characteristics of each method and gain insight in how different process parameters affect overall performance and reliability. With heat chamber sintering the best achievable conductivity without substrate deformation corresponded to less than 20% of pure silver. With some selective methods, conductivity reached well above 50% of pure silver.

     

     

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