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  • 1.
    Carlborg, Jakob
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Spårbarhet och kvalitetssäkring i livsmedelsindustrin: fallstudie av Kungsörnens produktsortiment2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 2.
    Fakhari Rad, Mohammad
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Fröling, Morgan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Grönlund, Erik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    More forest biofuels from Jämtland - ecosystem services tradeoffs2012In: Ecosystem Services - From policy to practice, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With increasing European demand for biofuels, the interest for forest biomass from the northernboreal forests of Sweden will increase. Traditional optimization parameters like carbon footprint orlife cycle energy use will not be enough to ensure the sustainability of forest biofuel production inSweden. Impacts on ecosystem services must also be assessed.Swedish forests today have annual volume growth surpassing harvesting. This is partly thebackground to the fact that land occupation parameters has not been considered relevant when itcomes to forestry in Sweden; the general forms of forest management practices used has made alsoproduction forestry seen as ‘nature’ (e.g. about three quarters of Swedish forests are certified byFSC, PEFC or both). With increasing competition for forest resources, harvesting pressure andintensity of forestry will likely increase, and the view ‘forests is nature’ will have to change.In the Swedish county of Jämtland there is 3.4 million ha of forest area, and forestry is an importantindustry. At the same time the county also has a large tourism industry, to a substantial extent forskiing but also for experiences of undisturbed nature, hiking, hunting, fishing et c. The county is alsomarketing itself as a “Quality Food Area” having a focus on traditional, small scale and localproduction of food products and food experiences, with the clean and uncontaminated environmentfor agriculture, game and fish as a cornerstone. More intensive forestry may create conflictsbetween such enterprises related to cultural ecosystem services and those provisioning servicespushed for biofuel production.We need to make possible the inclusion of negative impacts on ecosystem services from biofuelproduction as well as inclusion of tradeoffs between different types of e.g. cultural ecosystemservices in sustainability assessments of increased forest biofuel harvesting and production inJämtland.Before

  • 3.
    Haller, Henrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Appropriate Technologies for Soil Remediation in Low Prioritized Region: Developing Countries and Sparsely Populated Regions2015Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Contaminated sites in low prioritized regions demand remediation technologies that are cost- and energy-effective and locally adapted. Parameters such as the time frame during which bioremediation degradation needs to occur may not be as restraining as in urban environments. This licentiate project aims to explore opportunities and constraints for appropriate soil remediation based on organic by-products in tropical developing countries and sparsely populated areas in industrial countries. Ecological Engineering and the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development were explored as planning tools to steer bioremediation methods towards sustainability. The use of the five concepts of Ecological Engineering within the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development can steer bioremediation in low prioritized regions towards sustainability. Pilot-scale and laboratory experiments were undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of such bioremediation methods. Experiments carried out at the experiment station in Chontales, Nicaragua showed some promising results, but also revealed problems associated with the clay rich soils, which are typical for tropical regions. Treatment of diesel contaminated ultisol with 6 mL whey kg-1 dw in a pilot-scale experiment considerably increased the degradation rate of diesel constituents, but no effects on the degradation rates were observed after treatment with compost tea or pyroligneous acid.The soil columns study suggests that despite a favorable particle size distribution for microbial transport, the sandy loam retained a greater fraction of the microorganisms present in the ACT in the top 10 cm than the clay loam, presumably because the lower bulk density and higher SOM in the clay loam aided transport and growth of microorganisms.

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