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  • 1.
    Englund, Oskar
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Suistainable Building Engineering.
    Börjesson, Pål
    Lund University.
    Berndes, Göran
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Scarlat, Nicolae
    European Commission. Joint Research Centre (JRC), Ispra, Italy.
    Dallemand, Jean-Francois
    European Commission. Joint Research Centre (JRC), Ispra, Italy.
    Grizzetti, Bruna
    European Commission. Joint Research Centre (JRC), Ispra, Italy.
    Dimitriou, Ioannis
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Mola-Yudego, Blas
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences / University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu.
    Fahl, Fernando
    GFT Italia S.r.l., Milano, Italy.
    Beneficial land use change: Strategic expansion of new biomass plantations can reduce environmental impacts from EU agriculture2020In: Global Environmental Change, ISSN 0959-3780, E-ISSN 1872-9495, Vol. 60, article id 101990Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Society faces the double challenge of increasing biomass production to meet the future demands for food, materials and bioenergy, while addressing negative impacts of current (and future) land use. In the discourse, land use change (LUC) has often been considered as negative, referring to impacts of deforestation and expansion of biomass plantations. However, strategic establishment of suitable perennial production systems in agricultural landscapes can mitigate environmental impacts of current crop production, while providing biomass for the bioeconomy. Here, we explore the potential for such “beneficial LUC” in EU28. First, we map and quantify the degree of accumulated soil organic carbon losses, soil loss by wind and water erosion, nitrogen emissions to water, and recurring floods, in ∼81.000 individual landscapes in EU28. We then estimate the effectiveness in mitigating these impacts through establishment of perennial plants, in each landscape. The results indicate that there is a substantial potential for effective impact mitigation. Depending on criteria selection, 10–46% of the land used for annual crop production in EU28 is located in landscapes that could be considered priority areas for beneficial LUC. These areas are scattered all over Europe, but there are notable “hot-spots” where priority areas are concentrated, e.g., large parts of Denmark, western UK, The Po valley in Italy, and the Danube basin. While some policy developments support beneficial LUC, implementation could benefit from attempts to realize synergies between different Sustainable Development Goals, e.g., “Zero hunger”, “Clean water and sanitation”, “Affordable and Clean Energy”, “Climate Action”, and “Life on Land”.

  • 2.
    Hartman, Steven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    Unpacking the Black Box: the need for Integrated Environmental Humanities (IEH)2015Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The circumstances that have given rise to the Anthropocene concept require that we reassess our assumptions about human agency and human effects on the earth system. Human activities, and thus human choices, clearly lie at the root of the great environmental predicament of our age, which is not primarily an ecological crisis, though its ramifications are far reaching within ecological systems. Rather, it is a crisis of culture. If the humanities "are a unique repository of knowledge and insight into the rich diversity of the human experience" from which we learn to make sense of our "responses, motivations and actions" in the face of challenges, then it is risky to omit humanities knowledge from scientific assessment and consultation processes informing environmental policy.

    The complete article is available for free viewing on the Future Earth site: bit.ly/1QoHPeC .

  • 3.
    Japsen, Peter
    et al.
    Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Øster Voldgade 10, DK-1350 Copenhagen K, Denmark .
    Green, Paul F.
    Geotrack International, 37 Melville Road, Brunswick West, Victoria 3055, Australia .
    Bonow, Johan M.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography. Södertörn University, Alfred Nobels allé 7, SE-141 89 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Erlström, Mikael
    Geological Survey of Sweden (SGU), Kiliansgatan 10, 223 50 Lund, Sweden .
    Episodic burial and exhumation of the southern Baltic Shield: Epeirogenic uplifts during and after break-up of Pangaea2016In: Gondwana Research, ISSN 1342-937X, E-ISSN 1878-0571, Vol. 35, p. 357-377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Cratons are conventionally assumed to be areas of long-term stability. However, whereas Precambrian basement crops out across most of the Baltic Shield, Palaeozoic and Mesozoic sediments rest on basement in southern Sweden, and thus testify to a complex history of exhumation and burial. Our synthesis of published stratigraphic landscape analysis and new apatite fission-track analysis data reveals a history involving five steps after formation of the extremely flat, Sub-Cambrian Peneplain. (1) Cambrian to Lower Triassic rocks accumulated on the peneplain, interrupted by late Carboniferous uplift and exhumation. (2) Middle Triassic uplift removed the Palaeozoic cover along the south-western margin of the shield, leading to formation of a Triassic peneplain with a predominantly flat relief followed by deposition of Upper Triassic to Lower Jurassic rocks. (3) Uplift that began during the Middle Jurassic to earliest Cretaceous caused denudation leading to deep weathering that shaped an undulating, hilly relief that was buried below Upper Cretaceous to Oligocene sediments. (4) Early Miocene uplift and erosion produced the South Småland Peneplain with scattered hills. (5) Early Pliocene uplift raised the Miocene peneplain to its present elevation leading to reexposure of the sub-Cretaceous hilly relief near the coast. Our results thus provide constraints on the magnitude and timing of episodes of deposition and removal of significant volumes of Phanerozoic rocks across the southern portion of the Baltic Shield. Late Carboniferous, Middle Triassic and mid-Jurassic events of uplift and exhumation affected wide areas beyond the Baltic Shield, and we interpret them as epeirogenic uplifts accompanying fragmentation of Pangaea, caused by accumulation of mantle heat beneath the supercontinent. Early Miocene uplift affected north-west Europe but not East Greenland, and thus likely resulted from compressive stresses from an orogeny on the Eurasian plate. Early Pliocene uplift related to changes in mantle convection and plate motion affected wide areas beyond North-East Atlantic margins.

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