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  • 1.
    Deutschmann, Mats
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    Minugh, David
    Hincks, Rebecca
    Hudson, Jean
    Shaw, Philip
    Nygren, Åse
    An Inter-University Platform for Sharing and Collaborating in English Studies: Creating SEED (Sweden's English Educational Database for tertiary education)2009In: Language and Learning: Papers from the ASLA Symposium in Stockholm, 7-8 November, 2008 / [ed] Päivi Juvonen, Uppsala: Swedish Science Press, 2009, 1, p. 127-140Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: SEED is a two-year nationally-funded Swedish project (2006-2008) intended to establish a bottom-up, self-sustaining inter-university Internet-based network among active teachers and students of English in Swedish universities. This report describes its concepts, organization, failures and successes, and the general lessons that can be learned from the experience of creating and implementing such a network. SEED provides university students and teachers of English with two components: (i) a collaborative space for joint projects and exchange of ideas and (ii) a database repository of learning objects in the field of English studies. The interactive collaborative section is currently hosted by the Stockholm University version of the Sakai VLE (“Mondo”), and via guest logins is available to researchers, teachers and students at all levels. The repository in database form (currently less developed) uses the MIT/HP system called DSpace, which permits full integration with international library practices for documentation and retrieval. Once fully launched, SEED may serve as a model for similar networks in other fields of language studies, or other university areas.

  • 2.
    Deutschmann, Mats
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    Panichi, Luisa
    Pisa University.
    Instructional Design. Teacher Practice and Learning Autonomy2009In: Learning and Teaching in the Virtual World of Second Life / [ed] Judith Molka-Danielsen & Mats Deutschmann, Trondheim, Norway: Tapir Akademisk Forlag, 2009, 1, p. 27-44Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter is based on the experiences from language proficiency courses given on Kamimo education island and addresses concerns related to teacher practice in Second Life. We examine preparatory issues, task design and the teacher’s role in fostering learner autonomy in Second Life. Although the chapter draws mainly on experiences from and reflections in the domain of language education, it has general pedagogical implications for teaching in SL.

  • 3.
    Deutschmann, Mats
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    Panichi, Luisa
    Pisa University, Italy.
    Talking into empty space?: Signalling involvement in a virtual languageclassroom in Second Life2009In: Language Awareness, ISSN 0965-8416, E-ISSN 1747-7565, Vol. 18, no 3-4, p. 310-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we compare the first and the last sessions from an online oral proficiencycourse aimed at doctoral students conducted in the virtual world Second Life. The studyattempts to identify how supportive moves made by the teacher encourage learners toengage with language, and what type of linguistic behaviour in the learners leads toengagement in others. We compare overall differences in terms of floor space andturn-taking patterns, and also conduct a more in-depth discourse analysis of parts of thesessions focusing on supportive moves such as back-channelling and elicitors. There areindications that the supportive linguistic behaviour of teachers is important in increasinglearner engagement. In our studywe are also able to observe a change in student linguisticbehaviour between the first and the last sessions with students becoming more activein signalling involvement as the course progresses. Finally, by illustrating some of thelanguage awareness issues that arise in online environments, we hope to contribute tothe understanding of the dynamics of online communication.

  • 4.
    Deutschmann, Mats
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    Ädel, Anneli
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    Garretson, Gregory
    Walker, Terry
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    Introducing Mini-McCALL: A pilot version of the Mid-Sweden Corpus of Computer-Assisted Language Learning.2009In: ICAME journal, ISSN 0801-5775, no 33, p. 21-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present Mini-McCALL, a 1.3-million-word corpus of computer-mediated communication in the context of online English universitycourses.1 The data consist of three types of written communication – bothbetween students and between students and teachers – in English: discussionforum messages, e-mail messages, and documents handed in as assignments.This pilot corpus comprises the first stage of a proposed 10-million-word corpusof computer-assisted language learning based on the online English coursesoffered by the Department of Humanities at Mid-Sweden University (Mittuniversitetet).In what follows, we first consider e-learning – online, off-campus study,where the medium of instruction and communication involves computer technology– from a theoretical perspective, and the need for such a corpus as oursto facilitate research into this new learning environment, as well as into the languageused in e-learning. We then describe the structure and content of Mini-McCALL and highlight both the research potential of the material and studiescurrently underway, as well as looking forward to the future development of thefull Mid-Sweden Corpus of Computer-Assisted Language Learning (McCALL).Both Mini-McCALL and the ultimate McCALL corpus will be made freelyavailable to the research community.

  • 5.
    Lindgren, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Sullivan, Kirk P. H.
    Umeå universitet.
    Deutschmann, Mats
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    Steinvall, Anders
    Umeå universitet.
    Supporting Learning Reflection in the Language Translation Class2009In: International Journal of Information Communication Technologies and Human Development, ISSN 1935-5661, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 26-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a case study a University class undertook a translation from Swedish to English in a keystroke loggingenvironment and then replayed their translations in pairs while discussing their thought processes whenundertaking the translations, and why they made particular choices and changes to their translations.Computer keystroke logging coupled with peer-based intervention assisted the students in discussing howthey worked with their translations, and enabled them to see how their ideas relating to the translationdeveloped as they worked with the text. The process showed that Computer Keystroke logging coupledwith peer-based intervention has potential to (1) support student reflection and discussion around theirtranslation tasks, and (2) enhance student motivation and enthusiasm for translation.

  • 6.
    Molka-Danielsen, Judith
    et al.
    Molde University College.
    Deutschmann, MatsMid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    Learning and teaching in the virtual world of Second Life2009Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Virtual worlds are increasingly incorporated intomodern universities and teaching pedagogy. Over, 90 higher education institutions worldwide havedone teaching in the virtual world of Second Life(SL). This book is based on the first Scandinavianproject to experiment with the design and testingof teaching platforms for life long learning in SL.In 2007 the virtual island or"sim"in Sl called"Kamimo Education Island"was created. The projectgenerated a number of courses taught in SecondLife, and instructed educators in the use of Sl. This book disseminates the experiences andlessons learned in that project and from othereducational projects in SL This book provides aroadmap on issues of: instructional deSign, learnermodelling, building simulations, exploringalternatives to design and integrating tools ineducation with other learning systems.

  • 7.
    Molka-Danielsen, Judith
    et al.
    Molde University, Norway.
    Deutschmann, Mats
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities.
    Richardson, David
    Kalmar högskola.
    Carter, Bryan
    Central Missouri University.
    Teaching Language in a Virtual World2007In: NOKOBIT 2007 / [ed] Laurence Habib, Trondheim: Tapir Akademisk Forlag, 2007, 1, p. 97-109Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the development of a course for teaching a language in avirtual world. In partiCUlar we evaluate the' Course entitled, "Social English forDoctoral Students" that is in progress in the fan Semester of 2007. This COUrse willactivate learners and educators using a viuicty of support media includingMarratech conferencing system and Second Life virtual world platform. The pilotcourse part of a one year project sponsored by The Norwegian University program(NUV) is entitled "A Vinual Platform for Life Long Learning". In addition to thedevelopment of this course, we contribute with the development of an evaluationframework that may be applied to other Courses taught in Second Life as well.

1 - 7 of 7
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