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  • 1.
    Aylott, Nicholas
    et al.
    Södertörns högskola.
    Bolin, Niklas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    A party system in flux: the Swedish parliamentary election of September 20182019In: West European Politics, ISSN 0140-2382, E-ISSN 1743-9655Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Swedish parliamentary election of 7 September 2018, the biggest parties, the Social Democrats and the Moderates, both lost votes compared to their scores in the previous election, but not as many as they had feared. Commensurately, the radical-right challenger party, the Sweden Democrats (SD), which had seemed certain to profit from Sweden's dramatic experience of the European migration crisis, did well, but not as well as it had hoped. The result left the array of parliamentary forces fragmented and finely balanced. Only after months of negotiations could a government be formed. Eventually, the incumbent coalition received a renewed parliamentary mandate. At the same time, the party system was transformed.

  • 2.
    Bolin, Niklas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    The Centre Party and the Liberals: The Swedish members of the liberal party family?2019In: Liberal Parties in Europe / [ed] Caroline Close & Emilie van Haute, Routledge, 2019, p. 60-76Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Bolin, Niklas
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Aylott, Nicholas
    Södertörns högskola.
    The price of power: the greens in the 2018 Swedish parliamentary election2019In: Environmental Politics, ISSN 0964-4016, E-ISSN 1743-8934, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 568-573Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Boman, Robin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Innovationspolitikens styrning: Beskriven utifrån styrningsmodellerna NPM och govemance2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 5.
    Granberg, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Objective meaning: The formation of self in Mead and Sohn-Rethel2019In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 62, no 1, p. 34-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This analysis of the work of George Herbert Mead and Alfred Sohn-Rethel compares their respective accounts of the formation of the self. The analysis proceeds from two important similarities: the effort to understand self-consciousness not as primordial but as the product of social processes, and the view that these processes form a circuit: the self arises from consciousness’ return to itself, concluding a movement whereby consciousness is first externalized onto objects and then internalized, taking on the insular shape of self-consciousness. What sets the two accounts apart is the site from whence the self returns: objects. In Mead, the self returns from meaningful objects, and this same (intersubjective) meaning is entangled with the process of self-formation. In contrast, for Sohn-Rethel, the self returns from objects whose meaning is not established intersubjectively but objectively: the self is the unintended consequence of commodity exchange. In Mead, interaction among people affords meaning to objects and thus evokes the self; in Sohn-Rethel, interaction among commodities evokes an objective meaning that renders people as selves. Interpretative sociology should attend to the objectively and unconsciously meaningful forms analyzed by Sohn-Rethel. To illustrate this conclusion, reference is made to a certain experience of the social under neoliberalism.

  • 6.
    Harvard, Jonas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Socialist Communication Strategies And The Spring Of 1917: Managing revolutionary opinion through the media system2019In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 169-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Russian Revolution of 1917 presented Swedish Social Democrats with a dilemma: how could they use the transnational revolutionary momentum to further universal suffrage, without supporting actions possibly leading to violence? In striking this balance, the use of communications was central. This article uses the concept of the media system to analyse the communicative practices and strategies developed by the Party in the early 20th century, and how these were employed between 1915 and 1917, in relation to the hunger marches and revolutionary pressures. The study shows that the Party had established conscious agitation strategies and an elaborate national communication structure, which enabled coordinated opinion activities. As early as 1915, the Party began using these tools to initiate a national opinion movement concerning the food situation. In 1917, faced with the combination of events in Russia and erupting hunger marches, the Party leadership chose to emphasize security and stability, focusing on events the Party could control, such as the 1 May demonstrations. The resulting development of revolutionary opinion in Sweden during the spring of 1917 and the ensuing political changes reflected conscious media management strategies by the Left, who used the media system to navigate and shape a transnational revolutionary moment. 

  • 7.
    Holmgren, Jill
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    ”Afterwork = Alkohol efter jobbet”: En kvalitativ studie runt alkoholbruk i sälj- och finansbranschen och chefernas inflytande om detsamma2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 8.
    Högström, John
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    The Gender-Representation Gap in Radical Right Parties: Is There Any Contagion Effect from Parties with Small Gaps?2019In: Comparative Sociology, ISSN 1569-1322, E-ISSN 1569-1330, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 66-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is about women's political participation in times of increased influence from radical right parties. The gender-representation gap in the Swedish radical right party, the Sweden Democrats, is examined. A reformulated contagion theory is tested using three hypotheses. To test the hypotheses, a large-N study of all of Sweden's municipalities is conducted. The results show that a large gender-representation gap exists in the Sweden Democrats party compared with that in the other main parties, and the gap has a negative effect on the total level of female representation in the municipal councils. However, the gap and the negative effect are decreasing over time in relation to the other main parties, which supports the hypotheses and the reformulated contagion theory.

  • 9.
    Jarnkvist, Karin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Childbearing and Marriage: Investigating the Importance of Context for Meaning-Making of First-Time Marriage2019In: Marriage and Family Review, ISSN 0149-4929, E-ISSN 1540-9635, Vol. 55, no 1, p. 38-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research reveals that the temporal ordering of childbearing and marriage can have an impact on the meaning of first-time marriage. This article aims to obtain a deeper understanding of meaning-making of first-time marriage in relation to childbearing. Narrative interviews with 16 brides and grooms in 8 couples in Sweden were conducted. The material was analyzed in relation to the temporal ordering of childbearing and marriage. The study reveals that the construction of meaning of marriage does not only relate to the temporal context. Social factors such as social class or family formation might also be relevant for how meaning is constructed. This article contributes to a deeper understanding of meaning-making as a relational process constructed within particular contexts. 

  • 10.
    Kytö, Merja
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Walker, TerryMid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Dialogues in Diachrony: Celebrating Historical Corpora of Speech-related Texts2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Lidén, Gustav
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Nyhlén, Jon
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Nyhlén, Sara
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Neoliberal Steering in Swedish Integration Policy: the Rise and Fall of Introduction Guides2019In: Offentlig Förvaltning. Scandinavian Journal of Public Administration, ISSN 2000-8058, E-ISSN 2001-3310, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 23-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past decades, many policy sectors within European countries have encountered political reforms of neoliberal character. One of the key shifts has been the reorientation of public employment services that has been enforced, for example, through the establishment of what have been denoted as quasi-markets. Simultaneously with the rise of quasi-markets, welfare policy as a whole, including integration policy, has beenincreasingly oriented toward “activation”, with its focus on the individual’s obligationsand duties in relation to welfare services. These circumstances pose particular challenges to those charged with the governance of welfare services due to increasingly complex requirements for collaboration and control involving a multitude of actors. The reform is an example of a hybrid system where for- and non-profit actors compete for the“customer”, in this case, the newly arrived immigrant. This article focuses on the changes in Swedish integration reform as an archetype of these changes and studies a clearly defined case study. Empirically, this study draws from both documents and interviews. The article illustrates an unregulated and ill-monitored policy containing a model that comprises mixed modes of steering. The governance of the reform bears traits from both centralist and cooperative forms of governance and, thereby, involves competing philosophies of steering.

  • 12.
    Lidén, Gustav
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Olofsson, Anna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Living in a foreign country: The meaning of place of origin and gender for risk perceptions, experiences, and behaviors2019In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, E-ISSN 1466-4461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has convincingly proven that perceptions, experience, and exposure to risks vary among certain groups in society. By drawing from a unique combination of Swedish survey data and interviews, this study aims to investigate perceptions and experiences of risks as well as in relation to behavior by analyzing the cleavages related to interactions between place of origin and gender. Theoretically, we see individual risk perception as part of situated hierarchical power relations where an individual’s position (which is an intersection of, for example, gender, race, age, and place of origin) structures action and thought. Findings verify that foreign-born men and women perceive risks to a greater extent than those born in Sweden. However, no direct pattern of ethnicity is apparent in exposure to risks, but since predictors measuring experience of discrimination are shown to be significant, the effect can be mediated by such circumstances. In terms of how risks have affected behavior, women, irrespective of their ethnicity, are affected. Exposure to tragic experiences among those who are foreign born can pose risks that are perceived to a greater extent. Furthermore, more vulnerable material conditions can also affect how risks are perceived, and uncertainty due to a lack of resources and as an inherent ingredient of living in a foreign country seem to enhance perceptions of risk and feelings of unsafety. Last, the sense of discrimination appears to influence exposure to certain risks, which might capture an interaction between racism and violence.

  • 13.
    Linnell, Mikael
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    On the role of anticipation in risk theory2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On the role of anticipation in risk theory

    Mikael Linnell, RCR

    In this paper I discuss anticipation as a key concept in regard to the more established

    notions of risk and uncertainty. I argue that anticipation, although closely associated

    with the notion of risk, has for a long time remained undertheorized (e.g. Gasparini,

    2004:340; Poli, 2014:23, 2017:3). The overall purpose of the paper is thus to illustrate

    the fact that anticipation may function as a mediating phenomenon between our

    understanding of risk and our concrete practices for coping with uncertain futures. As

    have been argued by Adams et al. (2009:246), “one defining quality of our current

    moment is its characteristic state of anticipation, of thinking and living toward the

    future”. Moreover, Granjou et al. (2017:1), point to a number of recent scholarly

    themes, “ranging from an enduring assessment of the ‘not yet’ to the contested

    prefiguring of the ‘what if’”, which seems indicative of what might be a reinvigorated

    ‘futures turn’. This view is shared by Levitas (2013), Nowotny (2016) and Poli (2014),

    among others, who note that anticipation is at the heart of urgent risk-related debates,

    from climate change to economic crisis. Accordingly, there is obviously reason for

    some trans-disciplinary attention to and development of risk theory. In particular, we

    need to understand better how to engage with the complexity of anticipation and

    explore the knowledge practices associated with future-oriented approaches (e.g.

    Adam, 2011; Brown et al., 2000; Mallard and Lakoff, 2011). According to Szerszynski

    (2015), what is lacking is a systematic approach to ‘anticipatory regimes’ that enables

    us to study how anticipation is understood and practiced in different social formations.

    This paper is an attempt in this direction. Although a plethora of recent studies on risk

    and risk management focus on the ways in which various actors imagine future

    problems and seek to render them governable, the typical “governmental” study of

    risk appears to have more or less moved on (O’Malley, 2016:110). Perhaps the

    governmentality perspective, as we have come to know it, has now become

    normalized and appears as “the ghost in the machinery of a good deal of

    contemporary risk analysis – still present, but increasingly invisible” (O’Malley,

    2016:110).

  • 14.
    Linnell, Mikael
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Resilience in Sweden: Governance, Networks, and Learning2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Linnell, Mikael
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    The Haptic Space of Disaster2019In: Space and Culture, ISSN 1206-3312, E-ISSN 1552-8308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this article is to contribute to discussions on the spatialization of future eventsand, in particular, on enactment as the primary contemporary response to uncertain futures.Realistically simulated disasters is an emerging feature in contemporary public preparednessexercises. The purpose of such simulations is to foster public vigilance and initiative by way ofimmersive experiences of future disasters. This new mode of experiential learning calls for newanalytical concepts that take into account the dynamic relationship between the materialityof experience and the experiencing subject. Therefore, in this article, I propose an analyticalvocabulary derived from recent interjections in visual and cultural studies, human geography,and sociology. More specifically I make use of, and extend, the notions of “haptic space” and“haptic sense” as elaborated by Bruno (2014), Fisher (2012), and Marks (2015). I apply theseconcepts to make sense of my empirical encounter with public simulation centers in Japan andTurkey. Finally, I discuss some implications of the haptic perspective in this context.

  • 16.
    Norrman, Hanne
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Svensk försvarspolitisk riktning: Vilka effekter har politiska skiftningar i andra länder på svensk försvarspolitik?2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 17.
    Olausson, Pär M.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Planning for resilience in the case of power shortage: The Swedish STYREL policyIn: Central European Journal of Public Policy, ISSN 1802-4866, E-ISSN 1802-4866Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modern society has developed a growing dependence on electricity in order to carry out important societal functions. This implies the risk of cascading failures to society in the case of power shortage. The creation of a resilient and sustainable power energy system is therefore crucial. Equal crucial is the preparedness for the event of power shortage. As a part of the Swedish crisis management system, the Swedish Energy Agency (EM) has developed a planning system, Styrel, to identify social important objects in order to ensure important social functions in the case of power shortage. This article examines Styrel as a policy network and as a planning system to ensure a sustainable and resilient power supply. The study focus on the design of the system, the implementation of the system based on the results from the two rounds completed in 2010 and 2014. Using interviews with coordinators at the local and regional level in three counties and a survey including all 21 coordinators at the regional level, it indicates that the design of the planning system reviles opportunities for improvements of the planning system. The study also indicates that the coordinators at the local level lack trust in the planning system depending on both the lack of resource and the lack of feedback. This in turn indicates challenges for the system from a resilient and sustainability point of view.

  • 18.
    Petersson, Joakim
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Strand, Susanne
    Örebro Univ, Örebro; Swinburne Univ Technol, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Selenius, Heidi
    Örebro Univ, Örebro.
    Risk Factors for Intimate Partner Violence: A Comparison of Antisocial and Family-Only Perpetrators2019In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, ISSN 0886-2605, E-ISSN 1552-6518, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 219-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Subtyping male perpetrators of intimate partner violence (IPV) based on their generality of violence could facilitate the difficult task of matching perpetrator subtype with efficient risk management strategies. As such, the aim of the present study was to compare antisocial and family-only male perpetrators of interpersonal violence in terms of (a) demographic and legal characteristics, (b) risk factors for violence, and (c) assessed risk and the importance of specific risk factors for violence. A quantitative design was used in this retrospective register study on data obtained from the Swedish police. Risk assessments performed with the Swedish version of the Brief Spousal Assault Form for the Evaluation of Risk (B-SAFER) and police registers were used. A sample of 657 male alleged IPV perpetrators were classified as antisocial (n = 341) or family-only (n = 316) based on their generality of violence. The results showed that the antisocial perpetrators were significantly younger, as well as more psychologically abusive. Antisocial perpetrators also had significantly more present risk factors for IPV, and were assessed with a significantly higher risk for acute and severe or deadly IPV, compared with the family-only perpetrators. The subtypes also evidenced unique risk factors with a significant impact on elevated risk for acute and severe or deadly such violence. Key findings in the present study concerned the subtypes evidencing unique risk factors increasing the risk for acute and severe or deadly IPV. Major implications of this study include the findings of such unique "red flag" risk factors for each subtype. To prevent future IPV, it is vital for the risk assessor to be aware of these red flags when making decisions about risk, as well as risk management strategies.

  • 19.
    Skott, Sara
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Sexual Homicide Targeting Children: Exploring Offender, Victim, and Modus Operandi Factors2019In: International journal of offender therapy and comparative criminology, ISSN 0306-624X, E-ISSN 1552-6933Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sexual child homicides are rare, even among sexual homicides, and no previous study has compared sexual child homicide with nonsexual child homicides. To address this gap in research, this study aims to compare sexual child homicide offenders (n = 8) with two comparison groups: sexual adult homicide offenders (n = 89) and nonsexual child homicide offenders (n = 176) regarding victim, offender, and modus operandi factors. Using bivariate analysis, the results show that although sexual child homicide offenders appear more similar to other sexual homicide offenders than to homicide offenders, sexual offenders targeting children differ from both groups on certain variables. Sexual child homicide offenders more often used strangulation as a method of killing, had intoxicated victims, used multiple locations, and destroyed evidence after the murder. The study concludes that sexual homicide offenders targeting children should be considered distinct from other offenders and that the salient characteristics linked to sadism and instrumentality should be further examined.

  • 20.
    Skott, Sara
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    McVie, Susan
    University of Edinburgh.
    Reduction in homicide and violence in Scotland is largely explained by fewer gangs and less knife crime2019Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Skott, Sara
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences. Mid Sweden University.
    Disaggregating Violence: Understanding the Decline2019In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, ISSN 0886-2605, E-ISSN 1552-6518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although trends of violent crime have been examined for over a century, no previous study has examined the change of subtypes of violence over time. This study therefore aims to identify subtypes of violence in Scotland, where violence levels have decreased from one of the highest in Europe to one of the lowest, based on variables relating to the victim, offender, and incident, and to examine how these subtypes have changed over time. Four main types of violence were identified using multilevel latent class analysis on Scottish Crime and Justice Survey data: public no weapon, public weapon, work-related, and domestic. The findings show that although all types of violence have demonstrated an absolute decrease over time, Domestic and work-related violence have demonstrated relative increases over time. The findings are discussed in relation to the inequality of this decrease and propose guidelines for future prevention policies.

  • 22.
    Sparf, Jörgen
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Petridou, Evangelia
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Skog, Frida
    Kolmodin, Sophie
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Ljungdahl, Jens
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Experimental Design in Teaching Crisis and Emergency Management in Social Sciences.: The Case of the RCR Lab at Mid Sweden University2019In: International Journal of Mass Emergencies and Disasters, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 92-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This short paper is a case study of the RCR Lab located at the campus of Mid Sweden

    University in Northern Sweden. We argue that experimental design thinking in research

    and higher education in the fields of crisis and emergency management in social studies

    can ameliorate the post hoc methodological problem and shed light in the decision

    processes and information flow among first responders as well as public officials of various

    levels. The RCR Lab may be used as an enhanced, realistic space for the enrichment of

    role-playing and simulations, to activate students, as well as a sophisticated tool for the

    collection not only of quantitative, but also of qualitative data. The audience for this paper

    may be institutions of higher education that have a lab on campus and are looking for new

    ways of utilizing it, as well as educators in general who are looking for new ways to

    integrate experimental thinking in their classes.

  • 23.
    Zinn, Jens
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences. School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia.
    The meaning of risk-taking – key concepts and dimensions2019In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, E-ISSN 1466-4461, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dealing with and taking risks are central issues of current societies which had been characterised by heightened debates and conflicts about risk (Beck, Giddens). Even though there is good knowledge available, policies and strategies to reduce people’s risk-taking are often less successful than expected. Experts are puzzled about common people not following good advice presuming people’s lack of understanding. While this might be true in many cases a growing body of research shows, rather than being merely ignorant or misinformed, people often have good knowledge when taking risks. A growing body of research provides knowledge about the complexities, dynamics and contradictions of people’s risk-taking. However, there have been little attempts to systematise this body of knowledge. This article contributes to such an enterprise. It suggests distinguishing between different motives for risk-taking, different levels of control and a number of ways how reflexivity about risk is rooted in the social realm. It also explores how risk-taking is part of developing and protecting a valued identity. The article concludes, across different domains there is good evidence for how structural and cultural forces combine and shape risk-taking while people take risks to develop a valued identity and to protect it. Advancing expert’s understanding of risk-taking and change people’s risk-taking require considering and approaching the larger social contexts and individual risk practices in everyday life.

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