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  • 51.
    Schagatay, Erika
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Johan
    Department of Animal Physiology, Lund University.
    Hallén, Magnus
    Department of Surgery, Lund University Hospital, S-221 85 Lund.
    Pålsson, Birger
    Department of Surgery, Lund University Hospital, S-221 85 Lund.
    Selected Contribution: Role of spleen emptying in prolonging apneas in humans2001In: Journal of applied physiology, ISSN 8750-7587, E-ISSN 1522-1601, Vol. 90, no 4, p. 1623-1629Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study addressed the interaction between short-term adaptation to apneas with face immersion and erythrocyte release from the spleen. Twenty healthy volunteers, including ten splenectomized subjects, participated. After prone rest, they performed five maximal-duration apneas with face immersion in 10°C water, with 2-min intervals. Cardiorespiratory parameters and venous blood samples were collected. In subjects with spleens, hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration increased by 6.4% and 3.3%, respectively, over the serial apneas and returned to baseline 10 min after the series. A delay of the physiological breaking point of apnea, by 30.5% (17 s), was seen only in this group. These parameters did not change in the splenectomized group. Plasma protein concentration, preapneic alveolar PCO2, inspired lung volume, and diving bradycardia remained unchanged throughout the series in both groups. Serial apneas thus triggered the hematological changes that have been previously observed after long apneic diving shifts; they were rapidly reversed and did not occur in splenectomized subjects. This suggests that splenic contraction occurs in humans as a part of the diving response and may prolong repeated apneas.

  • 52.
    Schagatay, Erika
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Johan
    Nielsen, Bodil
    Hematological response and diving response during apnea and apnea with face immersion2007In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, ISSN 1439-6319, E-ISSN 1439-6327, Vol. 101, no 1, p. 125-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased hematocrit (Hct) attributable to splenic contraction accompanies human apneic diving or apnea with face immersion. Apnea also causes heart rate reduction and peripheral vasoconstriction, i.e., a cardiovascular diving response, which is augmented by face immersion. The aim was to study the role of apnea and facial immersion in the initiation of the hematological response and to relate this to the cardiovascular diving response and its oxygen conservation during repeated apneas. Seven male volunteers performed two series of five apneas of fixed near-maximal duration: one series in air (A) and the other with facial immersion in 10°C water (FIA). Apneas were spaced by 2 min and series by 20 min of rest. Venous blood samples, taken before and after each apnea, were analysed for Hct, hemoglobin concentration (Hb), lactic acid, blood gases and pH. Heart rate, skin capillary blood flow and arterial oxygen saturation were continuously measured non-invasively. A transient increase of Hct and Hb by approximately 4% developed progressively across both series. As no increase of the response resulted with face immersion, we concluded that the apnea, or its consequences, is the major stimulus evoking splenic contraction. An augmented cardiovascular diving response occurred during FIA compared to A. Arterial oxygen saturation remained higher, venous oxygen stores were more depleted and lactic acid accumulation was higher across the FIA series, indicating oxygen conservation with the more powerful diving response. This study shows that the hematological response is not involved in causing the difference in oxygen saturation between apnea and apnea with face immersion

  • 53.
    Schagatay, Erika
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Björklund, Glenn
    Rydh, F
    VO2 slow component abolished after warm up with apneas2009In: 14th Annual Congress of the ECSS in Oslo, Norway 24-27 June 2009, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 54.
    Schagatay, Erika
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    de Bruijn, Robert
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Richardson, Matthew
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Increase in hematocrit after short and long term apnea training2005In: Blue 2005. Human Behaviour and Limits in Underwater Environments. Abstract book: International Conference organised by: CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, Pisa - Italy Apnea Academy - Italy University of Chieti - Italy. Pisa December 1-4 2005., Pisa: CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology , 2005, p. 57-58Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 55.
    Schagatay, Erika
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    de Bruijn, Robert
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Richardson, Matthew
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Increases in diving response, hematocrit and asphyxia tolerance after apnea training2005Conference paper (Other scientific)
  • 56.
    Schagatay, Erika
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Engan, H
    Lodin-Sundström, Angelica
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Richardson, Matt
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Increase in reticulocyte count after 2 weeks of apne training: Meeting abstract2009In: Journal of Physiological Sciences, Suppl 1, 2009, Tokyo: Springer, 2009, p. 496-496Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 57.
    Schagatay, Erika
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Haughey, Helena
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Reimers, J
    Speed of spleen volume changes evoked by serial apneas2005In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, ISSN 1439-6319, E-ISSN 1439-6327, Vol. 93, no 4, p. 447-452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diving mammals may enhance dive duration by injecting extra erythrocytes into the circulation by spleen contraction. This mechanism may also be important for apneic duration in humans. We studied the speed and magnitude of spleen volume changes evoked by serial apneas, and the associated changes in hematocrit (Hct) and hemoglobin (Hb) concentration, diving response and apneic duration. Three maximal apneas separated by 2 min rest elicited spleen contraction in all ten subjects, by a mean of 49 (27) ml (18%; P<0.001). During the same period, Hct and Hb rose by 2.2 and 2.4% respectively (P<0.01 and P<0.001), and apneic duration rose by 20 s (22% P<0.05). The mean heart rate reduction of the diving response was 15%, which remained the same throughout the apnea series. While the diving response was completely reversed between the apneas, spleen size was not recovered until 8–9 min after the final apnea corresponding with recovery of Hct and Hb. Thus, although the spleen contraction may be associated with the cardiovascular diving response, it is likely to be triggered by different mechanisms, and it may remain activated between dives spaced by short pauses. The two adjustments may provide a fast, quickly reversed, and a slow, but long-lasting, way of shifting to a diving mode in humans

  • 58.
    Schagatay, Erika
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Haughey, Helena
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Reimers, J
    Spleen volume changes evoked by serial apneas: Underwater and Baromedical Society (EUBS) meeting Copenhagen2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 59.
    Schagatay, Erika
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Lodin-Sundström, Angelica
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Effect of fasting on static apnea performance2010In: Proceedings from the European Underwater Baromed Society 36th Annual Meeting Istanbul, Turkey 14-18 Sept 2010, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 60.
    Schagatay, Erika
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Lodin-Sundström, Angelica
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Abrahamsson, Erik
    Lunds Universitet.
    Underwater working time in two groups of traditional apneic divers in South East Asia.2010In: Proceedings from the European Underwater Baromed Society 36th Annual Meeting Istanbul, Turkey 14-18 Sept 2010, 2010, p. 0145-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 61.
    Schagatay, Erika
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Lodin-Sundström, Angelica
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Schagatay, Fanny Z
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Andersson, J P A
    Linér, M H
    Effects of depth and dive type on recovery of arterial oxygen saturation after deep competition apnea dives: Meeting Abstract2009In: Journal of Physiological Sciences Suppl 1, 2009, Tokyo: Springer, 2009, p. 224-224Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Schagatay, Erika
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Richardson, Matt
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Lodin, Angelica
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Spleen and lung volumes correlate with performance in elite apnea diversManuscript (Other academic)
  • 63.
    Schagatay, Erika
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Richardson, Matt
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Lodin-Sundström, Angelica
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Engan, H
    Hypercapnia augments spleen contraction and Hb increase during apnea: Meeting abstract2009In: Journal of Physiological Sciences Suppl 1, 2009, Tokyo: Springer, 2009, p. 268-268Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 64.
    Schagatay, Erika
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Richardson, Matthew
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    de Bruijn, Robert
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, J.
    Cardiovascular and hematological adjustments to apneic diving in humans. -Is the 'spleen-response' part of the diving response?2006In: Breath-hold diving 2006: UHMS proceedings, Orlando, USA, June 20-24, 2006, p. 20-24Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 65.
    Schagatay, Erika
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Schagatay, F
    Engan, H
    Lodin-Sundström, Angelica
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Hemoglobin concentration and performance in elite apneic divers of both genders: Meeting abstract2009In: Journal of Physiological Sciences, Suppl 1, 2009, Tokyo: Springer, 2009, p. 496-496Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 66.
    Schagatay, Erika
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    van Kampen, M
    Apneic snout immersion in trained pigs elicits a "diving response". 1995In: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0065-2598, Vol. 393, p. 73-76Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 67.
    Schagatay, Erika
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    van Kampen, M
    Andersson, Johan
    Effects of repeated apneas on apneic time and diving response in non-divers. 1998In: Undersea and Hyperbaric Medicine, ISSN 1066-2936, no 26, p. 143-149Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 68.
    Schagatay, Erika
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    van Kampen, Marja
    Emanuelsson, Stefan
    Holm, Boris
    Effects of physical and apnea training on apneic time and diving response in humans.2000In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, ISSN 1439-6319, E-ISSN 1439-6327, Vol. 82, no 3, p. 161-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this investigation was to study separately the effects of physical training and apnea training on the diving response and apneic time in humans. Both types of training have been suggested to lead to prolonged apneic time and an increased “diving response” (i.e., regional vasoconstriction and bradycardia). The study was also designed to examine the effects of these two types of training on the characteristics of the increase in apneic time with repeated apneas. Simulated diving tests were performed before and after the different training programs. The test format was one apnea and five apneas with facial immersion in cold water at 2-min intervals. An increase in apneic time was observed after physical training (n=24), and this was attributable to an increased time beyond the physiological breaking point. The other parameters that were measured remained unaffected. After apnea training (n=9), however, apneic time was increased by a delay in the physiological breaking point, which is mainly determined by the arterial tension of CO2. The diving response had increased, and the effect of repeated apneas on apneic time tended to be larger after apnea training. These results may explain the pronounced diving responses and long apneas observed in trained apneic divers

  • 69. Stenfors, N
    et al.
    Hubinette, A
    Lodin-Sundström, Angelica
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Schagatay, Erika
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Spleen contraction and erythrocyte release during exercised-induced hypoxia in patients with COPD2009In: European Respiratory Society (ERS), Vienna, Austria 12-16 Sept 2009, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Zimmerman, Jenny
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Palo, Thomas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Influence of water regulation and water flow on noble crayfish (Astacus astacus) catch in the River Ljungan, Sweden2008In: International association of Astacology, IAA18 konferens in Kuopio, August 2008. / [ed] Japo Jussila, James M. Furse & James W. Fetzner Jr, 2008, p. 141-144Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Free-flowing water is thought to be of importance for reproduction and body growth of noble crayfish, Astacus astacus (Linnaeus), in the northern edge of its distribution area. A hydroelectric power plant with a bypass tunnel was built in the River Ljungan, Sweden, in 1976. This reduced the mean water flow in the old river bed from about 60 m3 s-1 to 3 m3 s-1. The sites with the largest reduction of water flow had the largest decline in catch per unit effort of crayfish. At one site the catches were reduced by > 60%, but the catch success varied between locations. At all sites, water regulation seemed to have an effect, even though catch per unit effort was possibly affected by a number of other factors. © 2010 International Association of Astacology.

12 51 - 70 of 70
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