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  • 51.
    Neuman, Magnus
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Edström, Per
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Anisotropic reflectance from turbid media. II. Measurements2010In: Journal of the Optical Society of America A, ISSN 0740-3232, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 1040-1045Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The anisotropic reflectance from turbid media predicted using the radiative transfer based DORT2002 model is experimentally verified through goniophotometric measurements. A set of paper samples with varying amount of dye and thickness is prepared and their angle resolved reflectance is measured. An alleged perfect diffusor is also included. The corresponding simulations are performed. A complete agreement between the measurements and model predictions is seen regarding the characteristics of the anisotropy. They show that relatively more light is reflected in large polar angles when the absorption or illumination angle is increased or when the medium thickness is decreased. This is due to the relative amount of near-surface bulk scattering increasing in these cases. This affects the application of the Kubelka-Munk model as well as standards for reflectance measurements and calibration routines.

  • 52.
    Neuman, Magnus
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Edström, Per
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Anisotropic reflectance from turbid media. I. Theory2010In: Journal of the Optical Society of America A, ISSN 0740-3232, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 1032-1039Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is shown that the intensity of light reflected from plane-parallel turbid media is anisotropic in all situations encountered in practice. The anisotropy, in the form of higher intensity in large polar angles, increases when the amount of near-surface bulk scattering is increased, which dominates in optically thin and highly absorbing media. The only situation with isotropic intensity is when a non-absorbing infinitely thick medium is illuminated diffusely. This is the only case where the Kubelka-Munk model gives exact results and there exists an exact translation between Kubelka-Munk and general radiative transfer. This also means that a bulk scattering perfect diffusor does not exist. Angular resolved models are thus crucial for a correct understanding of light scattering in turbid media. The results are derived using simulations and analytical calculations. It is also shown that there exists an optimal angle for directional detection which minimizes the error introduced when using the Kubelka-Munk model to interpret reflectance measurements with diffuse illumination.

  • 53.
    Neuman, Magnus
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Edström, Per
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Andersson, Mattias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Coppel, Ludovic
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Norberg, Ole
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Angular Variations of Color in Turbid Media – the Influence of Bulk Scattering on Goniochromism in Paper2010In: 5th European Conference on Colour in Graphics, Imaging, and Vision and 12th International Symposium on Multispectral Colour Science 2010, CGIV 2010/MCS'10, 2010, p. 407-413Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The angular variations of color of a set of paper samples are  experimentally assessed using goniophotometric measurements.  The corresponding simulations are done using a radiative transfer based simulation tool, thus considering only the contribution  of bulk scattering to the reflectance. It is seen that measurements  and simulations agree and display the same characteristics, with  the lightness increasing and the chroma decreasing as the observation  polar angle increases. The decrease in chroma is larger  the more dye the paper contains. Based on previous results about  anisotropic reflectance from turbid media these findings are explained.  The relative reflectance in large polar angles of wavelengths  with strong absorption is higher than that of wavelengths  with low absorption. This leads to a loss of chroma and color information  in these angles. The increase in lightness is a result  of the anisotropy affecting all wavelengths equally, which is the  case for transmitting media and obliquely incident illumination.  The only case with no color variations of this kind is when a nonabsorbing,  non-transmitting medium is illuminated diffusely. The  measured and simulated color differences are clearly large, and  it is an open issue how angle resolved color should be handled  in standard color calculations.

  • 54.
    Neuman, Magnus
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Edvardsson, Sverker
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Edström, Per
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    A particle approach to the radiative transfer equation with fluorescence2013Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 55.
    Neuman, Magnus
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Edvardsson, Sverker
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Edström, Per
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Solving the radiative transfer equation with a mathematical particle method2015In: Optics Letters, ISSN 0146-9592, E-ISSN 1539-4794, Vol. 40, no 18, p. 4325-4328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We solve the radiative transfer equation (RTE) using a recently proposed mathematical particle method, originally developed for solving general functional equations. We show that, in the case of the RTE, it gives several advantages, such as handling arbitrary boundary conditions and phase functions and avoiding numerical instability in strongly forward-scattering media. We also solve the RTE, including fluorescence, and an example is shown with a fluorescence cascade where light is absorbed and emitted in several steps. We show that the evaluated particle method is straightforward to implement, which is in contrast with many traditional RTE solvers, but a potential drawback is the tuning of the method parameters.

  • 56.
    Neuman, Magnus
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    G. Coppel, Ludovic
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Edström, Per
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Angle resolved color of bulk scattering media2011In: Applied Optics, ISSN 1559-128X, E-ISSN 2155-3165, Vol. 50, no 36, p. 6555-6563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The angle resolved reflectance factor of matte samples is measured with a goniophotometer and simulated using radiative transfer theory. Both measurements and simulations display the same characteristic dependence of the reflectance factor on the observation angle. The angle resolved reflectance spectra are translated to CIELAB color coordinates and the angular color differences are found to be surprisingly large. A chromatic adaptation that is dependent on the observation angle is suggested, in which a nonabsorbing opaque medium is used as the reference white, and the angular color differences are then reduced. Furthermore, the use of an undyed paper as the reference white is evaluated. The angular lightness differences are then reduced further, but the angular differences in chroma are still large. It is suggested that smaller variations in perceived color could be explained by angle dependent chromatic adaptation and a limited sensitivity of the human visual system to changes in chroma.

  • 57.
    Neuman, Magnus
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of applied science and design.
    Gustafsson Coppel, Ludovic
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of applied science and design.
    Edström, Per
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of applied science and design.
    A partial explanation of the dependence between light scattering and light absorption in the Kubelka-Munk model2012In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 426-430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Kubelka-Munk scattering and absorption coefficients of a set of paper samples are assessed using reflectance measurements in d/0 geometry. The coefficients display the widely studied dependence between light scattering and light absorption, since the light scattering coefficient decreases in regions of high absorption. It is shown using general radiative transfer theory that part of this dependence can be explained and eliminated by taking into account the geometry of the d/0 instrument and the single scattering anisotropy, thus capturing the angular variations of the light reflected from the samples. These findings allow the papermaker to better predict the reflectance from mixtures of pulps, fillers, dye, and FWA, and to better evaluate bleaching efforts. 

  • 58. Persson, Erik
    et al.
    Engstrand, Per
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Karlsson, Lennart
    Nilsson, Fredrik
    Wahlgren, Mikael
    Utilization of the natural variations in wood properties in production of TMP: Comparison between pilot plant and mill scale trials using different assortments of Norway spruce pulpwood2003In: 2003 International Mechanical Pulping Conference / Pulp and Paper Technical Association of Canada: International Mechanical Pulping Conference ; (Quebec) : 2003.06.02-05, Montreal: PAPTAC , 2003, p. 485-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    International Mechanical Pulping Conference, Québec City Canada x-y June 2003, Persson, Erik., Engstrand, Per, Karlsson, Lennart., Nilsson, Fredrik, Wahlgren, Mikael.

  • 59.
    Rahaman, G. M. Atiqur
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Norberg, O.
    Umea Univ, Dept Appl Phys & Elect, Umea, Sweden.
    Edström, Per
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Experimental analysis for modeling color of halftone images2015In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), Springer, 2015, Vol. 9016, p. 69-80Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reflectance models such as the monochrome Murray–Davies (MD) and the Neugebauer color equations make inaccurate predictions owing to changes in reflectance or tristimulus values (TSVs) of halftone dots and the paper between the dots. In this paper, we characterize the change of micro-TSVs as a function of printed area in spectral halftone image by a power function and compare its prediction efficiency using theoretically and experimentally measured limiting TSVs assuming dots of uniform thickness. We found that experimentally accounting for dot thickness variations as solid and mixed areas more precisely explained the single-model parameter that captured the observed lateral light scattering effect. The results showed that incorporating empirically modeled TSVs of the dots and the paper between dots, as well as introducing a new term addressing mixed area in the MD equation, produced CIE ΔE* ab in the range 1.22–1.76, and the overall gain was more than 1 ΔE* ab.

  • 60.
    Rahaman, G M Atiqur
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Norberg, Ole
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Edström, Per
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Extension of Murray-Davies tone reproduction model by adding edge effect of halftone dots2014In: Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, San Francisco, California, United States: SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2014, p. Art. no. 90180F-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose expanding the Murray-Davies formula by adding the effect of edges of solid inks in a halftoned image. The expanded formula takes into account the spectral reflectance of paper white, full tone ink and mixed area scaled by the fractional area coverages. Here, mixed area mainly refers to the edge of an inked dot where the density is very low, and lateral exchange of photons can occur. Also, in such area the paper micro components may have higher scattering power than ink, especially, in uncoated paper. Our methodology uses cyan, magenta and yellow separation ramps printed on different papers by impact and non-impact based printing technologies. The samples include both frequency and amplitude modulation halftoning methods of various print resolutions. Based on pixel values, the captured microscale halftoned image is divided into three categories: solid ink, mixed area, and unprinted paper between the dots. The segmented images are then used to measure the fractional area coverage that the model receives as parameters. We have derived the characteristic reflectance spectrum of mixed area by rearranging the expanded formula and replacing the predicted term with the measured value using half of the maximum colorant coverage. Performance has clearly improved over the Murray-Davies model with and without dot gain compensation, more importantly, preserving the linear additivity of reflectance of the classical physics-based model.

  • 61.
    Rahaman, G M Atiqur
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Norberg, Ole
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Edström, Per
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Microscale halftone color image analysis: perspective of spectral color prediction modeling2014In: Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering: Color Imaging XIX: Displaying, Processing, Hardcopy, and Applications, San Francisco, California, United States: SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2014, p. Art. no. 901506-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A method has been proposed, whereby k-means clustering technique is applied to segment microscale single color halftone image into three components—solid ink, ink/paper mixed area and unprinted paper. The method has been evaluated using impact (offset) and non-impact (electro-photography) based single color prints halftoned by amplitude modulation (AM) and frequency modulation (FM) technique. The print samples have also included a range of variations in paper substrates. The colors of segmented regions have been analyzed in CIELAB color space to reveal the variations, in particular those present in mixed regions. The statistics of intensity distribution in the segmented areas have been utilized to derive expressions that can be used to calculate simple thresholds. However, the segmented results have been employed to study dot gain in comparison with traditional estimation technique using Murray-Davies formula. The performance of halftone reflectance prediction by spectral Murray-Davies model has been reported using estimated and measured parameters. Finally, a general idea has been proposed to expand the classical Murray-Davies model based on experimetal observations. Hence, the present study primarily presents the outcome of experimental efforts to characterize halftone print media interactions in respect to the color prediction models. Currently, most regression-based color prediction models rely on mathematical optimization to estimate the parameters using measured average reflectance of a large area compared to the dot size. While this general approach has been accepted as a useful tool, experimental investigations can enhance understanding of the physical processes and facilitate exploration of new modeling strategies. Furthermore, reported findings may help reduce the required number of samples that are printed and measured in the process of multichannel printer characterization and calibration.

  • 62.
    Rahaman, G M Atiqur
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Norberg, Ole
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Edström, Per
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    The effect of media interactions in predicting spectral reflectance by color prediction models2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 63.
    Zhang, Renyun
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Andersson, Mattias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andres, Britta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Edlund, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Edström, Per
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Edvardsson, Sverker
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Forsberg, Sven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Johansson, Niklas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Karlsson, Kristoffer
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Nilsson, Hans-Erik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Norgren, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Olsen, Martin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Uesaka, Tetsu
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Öhlund, Thomas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Soap-film coating: High-speed deposition of multilayer nanofilms2013In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 3, p. Art. no. 1477-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The coating of thin films is applied in numerous fields and many methods are employed for the deposition of these films. Some coating techniques may deposit films at high speed; for example, ordinary printing paper is coated with micrometre-thick layers of clay at a speed of tens of meters per second. However, to coat nanometre thin films at high speed, vacuum techniques are typically required, which increases the complexity of the process. Here, we report a simple wet chemical method for the high-speed coating of films with thicknesses at the nanometre level. This soap-film coating technique is based on forcing a substrate through a soap film that contains nanomaterials. Molecules and nanomaterials can be deposited at a thickness ranging from less than a monolayer to several layers at speeds up to meters per second. We believe that the soap-film coating method is potentially important for industrial-scale nanotechnology.

  • 64.
    Zhang, Renyun
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Mattias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Andres, Britta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Edström, Per
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Edvardsson, Sverker
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Forsberg, Sven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Johansson, Niklas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Kalsson, Kristoffer
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Nilsson, Hans-Erik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Olsen, Martin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Öhlund, Thomas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    High-speed deposition of multilayer nanofilms using soap-film coating2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-speed deposition of multilayer nanofilms using soap-film coating

    Renyun Zhang, Henrik A. Andersson, Mattias Andersson, Britta Andres, Per Edström, Sverker Edvardsson, Sven Forsberg, Magnus Hummelgård, Niklas Johansson, Kristoffer Karlsson, Hans-Erik Nilsson, Martin Olsen, Tetsu Uesaka, Thomas Öhlund & Håkan Olin

    Department of Applied Science and Design, Mid Sweden University, SE-85170 Sundsvall, Sweden

    Email: renyun.zhang@miun.se or hakan.olin@miun.se

    Coating1 of thin films is of importance for making functionalized surfaces with applications in many fields from electronics to consumer packaging. To decrease the cost, large scale roll-to-roll2 coating techniques are usually done at high speed, for example, ordinary printing paper is coated at a speed of tens of meters per second by depositing micrometer thick layers of clay. However, nanometer thin films are harder to coat at high speed by wet-chemical methods, requiring special roll-to-roll vacuum techniques3 with the cost of higher complexity.

    Here, we report a simple wet chemical method for high-speed coating of films down to molecular thicknesses, called soap-film coating (SFC)4. The technique is based on forcing a substrate through a soap film that contains nanomaterials. In the simplest laboratory version, the films can be deposited by a hand-coating procedure set up in a couple of minutes. The method is quite general molecules or nanomaterials or sub-micrometer materials (Figure 1) with thicknesses ranging from less than a monolayer to several layers at speeds up to meters per second. The applications of soap-film coating is quite wide an we will show solar cells, electrochromic devices, optical nanoparticle crystals, and nano-film devices. We believe that the soap-film coating method is potentially important for industrial-scale nanotechnology.

    Fig. 1. Soap film coating of nanoparticles, layered materials, nanowires, and molecules. a sub-monolayer 240 nm silica nanoparticle (scale bar 2 µm) b monolayer c double layer. d monolayer gold nanoparticles. e single layer TiO2 nanoparticles. f sub-monolayer polystyrene (scale 2 µm), g monolayer of polystyrene. h triple-layer of polystyrene. i monolayer of Ferritin.  j AFM image of <1.5 layer GO film (3 µm x 2 µm). k clay on glass (scale 2 µm). l SFC coated nanocellulose. m Absorbance spectra Rhodamine B on a glass slide. AFM of SDS layers n (2 µm x 1.5 µm) and o (20 µm x 15 µm).

    References

    1. Tracton, A. A. Coating Technology Handbook (CRC Press, Boca Raton, 2006).

    2. Ohring, M. Materials science of thin films. (Academic press., 2001).

    3. Charles, B. Vacuum deposition onto webs, films and foils. (William Andrew, 2011).

    Zhang, R. Y., Andersson, H. A., Andersson, M., Andres, B., Edström, P., Edvardsson, S., Forsberg, S., Hummelgård, M., Johansson, N., Karlsson, K., Nilsson, H.-E., Olsen, M., Uesaka, T., Öhlund, T., Olin H. Soap film coating: High-speed deposition of multilayer nanofilms. Submitted.

12 51 - 64 of 64
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