miun.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1234567 51 - 100 of 395
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 51.
    Brouder, Patrick
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Evolutionary Economic Geography and Tourism Studies: Extant Studies and Future Research Directions2014In: Tourism Geographies, ISSN 1461-6688, E-ISSN 1470-1340, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 540-545Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the extant literature on evolutionary economic geography (EEG) and tourism studies and briefly reviews what has been produced thus far. There are two main areas addressed: path dependence (and how to break from a path) and co-evolution (of tourism paths within a given region and of regional paths including tourism). The papers already published on EEG and tourism feature cases from resort communities, mass tourism destinations and rural and peripheral areas with all cases from highly developed countries (Canada, Sweden, Denmark, Italy and Australia). Next, the papers of the special issue are explored and show a broadening of the geographical reach (to include China and Spain) and a move to apply EEG theory as part of a hybrid theoretical framework. Finally, the paper concludes with a call for broader evolutionary approaches in tourism studies beyond strictly business development studies. This ultimately requires the development of EEG measures in line with the goals of sustainable tourism development.

  • 52.
    Brouder, Patrick
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography. Brock Univ, Canada; Univ Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Evolutionary economic geography: reflections from a sustainable tourism perspective2017In: Tourism Geographies, ISSN 1461-6688, E-ISSN 1470-1340, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 438-447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evolutionary economic geography (EEG) is receiving increasing attention from tourism geographers with over 30 publications explicitly incorporating EEG into tourism between 2011 and 2016. Many of these contributions are conceptual, which is not surprising given the novelty of EEG within economic geography, in general, and tourism, in particular. However, a sizeable number of these are built on detailed case studies, using EEG as an analytical lens rather than as a conceptual point of departure. Thus, many tourism researchers have found that EEG has great potential for understanding change in tourism destinations. In this Research Frontiers paper I critically reflect on this early research of EEG in tourism geographies from a sustainable development perspective. In the cases presented, EEG offers a fresh understanding of two related challenges in each of two separate aspects of sustainable tourism development. First, pro-growth governance models can be disrupted by engaged local stakeholders in order to make tangible sustainability gains but these gains remain precarious over time as pro-growth governance models prove tenacious in the very long-term. Second, regional institutional legacies hamper new path emergence in two ways - through institutional inertia which keeps the region's focus on past success in other sectors and through the (possibly competing) institutional imperatives of the dominant and emerging tourism sub-sectors or sub-regions. These challenges are illustrated through two complementary Canadian cases drawn from the extant literature - the mass tourism destination of Niagara and the resort community of Whistler. I highlight how a sustainable tourism perspective can also help to critique EEG theory and empirics in line with other recent political economy critiques in economic geography. I conclude that sustainable tourism, at its best, is an established reflexive lens which will help to develop, validate, and challenge aspects of EEG theory within tourism studies, in particular, and economic geography, in general.

  • 53.
    Brouder, Patrick
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography. University of Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Post-inscription Challenges: Renegotiating World Heritage Management in the Laponia Area in Northern Sweden2016In: World Heritage Sites and Tourism: Global and Local Relations, Routledge, 2016, p. 117-128Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 54.
    Brouder, Patrick
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Tourism and Sustainable Community Development in Northern Sweden2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Small businesses with tourism as a focus are found in many rural and peripheral areas, including Northern Sweden. Tourism development in Northern Sweden has led to employment gains and it also contributes to local community development. This report presents findings on tourism’s modest but sustainable contribution to local and regional development. Tourism in Northern Sweden is mainly nature-based tourism (NBT) with a large share of businesses being accommodation providers as well as a large share of activity-based businesses. Domestic tourism dominates across the seasons and the region but a four seasons approach has been developing in recent decades. This report shows why tourism is closely aligned to sustainability goals in Northern Sweden with sustainable tourism development facing both challenges and opportunities. New tourism firms add to employment over time despite the failure of most new firms. Market segments which are geographically distant from protected areas are drawn to them because of their unique attributes. Climate change is a long-term challenge to winter tourism in particular. Food tourism is underdeveloped but growing in Northern Sweden and has potential to contribute to sustainable local food systems and community development. Tourism should be seen not as a last resort but more as a lasting resource for community development in northern Sweden.

  • 55.
    Brouder, Patrick
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Tourism Development in Peripheral Areas: Processes of Local Innovation and Change in Northern Sweden2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Tourism has reached almost all regions of the world and has had a notable growth in the peripheral regions of Europe. Attempts at tourism development in rural and peripheral areas have resulted in widely varying outcomes and have often been undertaken as a last resort by communities. Despite mixed results, tourism persists as a tool for regional development. There has not been so much research on the evolving nature of tourism entrepreneurship in regions where tourism is relatively new as a commercial/entrepreneurial activity, e.g., the rural and peripheral north of Europe. This thesis presents Northern Sweden as a regional case study but it is reasonable to assume that the research results are transferable to similar regions with a similar range of nature-based tourism in small communities.

     

    The results show that tourism stakeholders co-evolve over time even though formal networks are loose and project-based (Article 1). Tourism firm survival improves for entrepreneurs with previous related experience but there is not necessarily an outsider advantage and new tourism firms contribute to job creation despite high rates of attrition (Article II). Protected areas with unique attributes (e.g., Laponia) can attract distant entrepreneurs but must manage these stakeholders more proactively (Article III). Climate change is a long-term challenge with firms not needing to adapt yet but facing differing exposures dependent on location and firm mobility (Article IV). Finally, evolutionary economic geography helps to better understand the processes of change in tourism in rural and peripheral areas (Article V).

  • 56.
    Brouder, Patrick
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography. Brock University, Canada.
    Clavé, Salvador AntonRovira i Virgili University, Spain.Gill, AlisonSimon Fraser University, Canada.Ioannides, DimitriMid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Tourism destination evolution2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Outlining the need for fresh perspectives on change in tourism, this book offers a theoretical overview and empirical examples of the potential synergies of applying evolutionary economic geography (EEG) concepts in tourism research. EEG has proven to be a powerful explanatory paradigm in other sectors and tourism studies has a track record of embracing, adapting, and enhancing frameworks from cognate fields. EEG approaches to tourism studies complement and further develop studies of established themes such as path dependence and the Tourism Area Life Cycle. The individual chapters draw from a broad geographical framework and address distinct conceptual elements of EEG, using a diverse set of tourism case studies from Europe, North America and Australia. Developing the theoretical cohesion of tourism and EEG, this volume also gives non-specialist tourism scholars a window into the possibilities of using these concepts in their own research. Given the timing of this publication, it has great potential value to the wider tourism community in advancing theory and leading to more effective empirical research.

  • 57.
    Brouder, Patrick
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography. Brock University, Canada.
    Clavé, Salvador Anton
    Rovira i Virgili University, Spain.
    Gill, Alison
    Simon Fraser University, Canada.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Why is tourism not an evolutionary science?: Understanding the past, present and future of destination evolution2016In: Tourism destination evolution / [ed] Patrick Brouder, Salvador Anton Clavé, Alison Gill and Dimitri Ioannides, Routledge, 2016, p. 1-18Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 58.
    Brouder, Patrick
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Eriksson, Rikard H.
    Univ, Dept Geog & Econ Hist, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.
    Tourism Evolution: On the Synergies of Tourism Studies and Evolutionary Economic Geography2013In: Annals of Tourism Research, ISSN 0160-7383, E-ISSN 1873-7722, Vol. 43, no Oct, p. 370-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The tourism economy is a fertile ground for multi-disciplinary research. It is vast anddiverse and differs markedly from other sectors. The challenging epistemology of thetourism economy makes it an intriguing field of study for scholars who are not groundedin the discipline. Likewise, tourism scholars tend to be open to advancements in otherdisciplines and readily embrace them. However, the idiosyncrasies of the tourismeconomy mean any new approach must be carefully vetted for fitness to task. Currentadvances in evolutionary economic geography (EEG) are receiving increasing interestfrom tourism scholars. EEG emerged from the literature on path dependence, complexitytheory, and generalised Darwinism. It has proven to be a powerful explanatory paradigmin other sectors, e.g., high-technology and creative sectors. There remains, however, alack of theoretical discussion on evolutionary principles of economic change withinrelatively low-technology service sectors, of which tourism is a prime example.This paper introduces the sub-discipline of evolutionary economic geography (EEG) to awider tourism audience and explores its possibilities and its potential drawbacks inapplications within tourism research. After presenting the core principles of EEG andhow they relate to tourism studies, a selection of new research paths combining EEG andtourism studies are presented starting with a brief illustration comparing Butler'sTourism Area Life Cycle (TALC) to Martin's stylised alternative development paths. Asignificant advantage of EEG is its heterodox economic rationale which acknowledgesthe existence of several co-evolving, long-term, socially-embedded development paths.This has resonance for tourism scholars engaged in regional development research whosee tourism as one (or more) oft-contested, dynamic development path(s) among many.The paper finds a number of latent research synergies with potential mutual benefits toEEG development and tourism studies. The paper concludes by calling for furtherempirical engagement with EEG by tourism scholars to gain new perspectives ontourism's place in the wider processes of regional economic development.

  • 59.
    Brouder, Patrick
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography. Brock University, Canada ; University of Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Fullerton, C
    Department of Geography, Brock University, Canada.
    Co-evolution and sustainable tourism development: From old institutional inertia to new institutional imperatives in niagara2015In: Tourism Destination Evolution / [ed] Brouder, P., Clavé, S.A., Gill, A., Ioannides, D., Taylor & Francis, 2015, p. 149-164Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 60.
    Brouder, Patrick
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography. Brock Univ, Dept Geog, St Catharines, ON L2S 3A1, Canada.
    Fullerton, Christopher
    Brock Univ, Dept Geog, St Catharines, ON L2S 3A1, Canada.
    Exploring Heterogeneous Tourism Development Paths: Cascade Effect or Co-evolution in Niagara?2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 15, no 1-2, p. 152-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tourism is often galvanised around a central theme based on a region's strengths in product supply and promotional opportunity, which usually results in an identifiable regional brand. However, this also hides the existing heterogeneity of tourism supply, especially in regions with an established brand. Securing long-term community economic development requires a broader focus since some unheralded tourism development paths may prove resilient over the long term and ultimately contribute to community development. This paper investigates the less central stakeholders in the Niagara region of Canada and explores how future studies might integrate marginal tourism stakeholders in studies of the regional tourism economy. Through semi-structured interviews with regional tourism stakeholders, the analysis of the Niagara region, based on perspectives of co-evolution from evolutionary economic geography, reveals a new perspective on tourism development by focussing on the place of marginal stakeholders in a region with a strong tourism brand. The region exhibits strong path dependence based on its industrial and agricultural legacy but long-term, organic, incremental processes of change within the region are creating new tourism development paths. These new paths co-evolve with the dominant tourism paths as well as other community development initiatives leading to positive change across the region.

  • 61.
    Brouder, Patrick
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography. School of Tourism and Hospitality, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography. Department of Geography, Geology, and Planning, Missouri State University, Springfield, MO, United States .
    Urban Tourism and Evolutionary Economic Geography: Complexity and Co-evolution in Contested Spaces2014In: Urban Forum, ISSN 1015-3802, E-ISSN 1874-6330, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 419-430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban tourism is an important research topic whether in mass tourism resortareas where tourism is the economic staple or in metropolitan areas where it is one (ormore) development path(s) among many. Urban areas are dynamic and fast-pacedenvironments but are also places where social and economic inequalities are moststark. Economic geography is one theoretical perspective through which researchersaddress urban tourism. The recent“evolutionary turn”in economic geography isfinding its way to tourism studies but has only been applied to a few urban tourismcases. This paper sets out the potential of evolutionary economic geography (EEG) as aconceptual framework for urban tourism studies. The analysis draws on recent studiesof urban tourism from an evolutionary perspective to highlight the strengths of takingsuch an approach and a number of avenues yet to be explored are put forward. Urbantourism affects large numbers of residents and businesses as well as influencing labourflows, and so understanding the dynamic nature of its development paths is vital.Tourism development does not occur in a vacuum, and urban tourism is one area wherethe complexity of the tourism economy and its place within broader regional develop-ment strategies is most obvious. Under recent neoliberal policies of urban development,tourism has become closely associated with place-based competition and large capitalinvestments. Urban tourism also enters the fray in matters of contested urban spaceswith issues of local governance, such as privatisation of public space, moving increas-ingly to the fore. The paper concludes with a list of future approaches to evolutionarystudies of urban tourism to broaden the scope beyond the dominant financial metrics oftourism success.

  • 62.
    Brouder, Patrick
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography. 1. School of Tourism and Hospitality, University of Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Karlsson, Svante
    Department of Geography & Economic History, Umeå University,.
    Lundmark, Linda
    Department of Geography & Economic History, Umeå University.
    Hyper-Production: a New Metric of Multifunctionality2015In: European Countryside, ISSN 1803-8417, E-ISSN 1803-8417, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 134-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multifunctionality has emerged as the dominant framework for understanding rural socioeconomic landscapes. The central claim of multifunctionality - that rural regions need to be understood as being made up of more than just traditional uses - has led to the incorporation of new rural activities into regional development plans, e.g., tourism. In some places, such post-productive activity is perceived to be slowly replacing productive uses of the land, e.g., agriculture/forestry. However, there is limited empirical evidence to support such claims. Drawing on previous research and data from the Swedish countryside this paper shows that, even as the number of persons employed within traditional activities decreases, the economic output per areal unit and per labour hour is increasing over time and traditional uses still occupy the majority of rural space. Hyper-production is introduced as a new metric for understanding multifunctional regions going forward. The complementary union of economic mainstays, such as agriculture, and newer activities with more quality-of-life benefits, such as tourism, is highlighted in terms of economic diversification, job creation and local social capital development, while the conflict-prone intersection of these two modes is also acknowledged. Understanding hyper-production as a key metric of multifunctionality is thus argued as integral to planning and developing resilient rural regions now and for the future.

  • 63.
    Brouder, Patrick
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Wall Reinius, Sandra
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Managing Tourism for Sustainable Local Development in Jokkmokk, Sweden2016In: Tourism, People and Protected Areas in Polar Wilderness, Icelandic Tourism Research Centre , 2016, p. 36-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 64.
    Brown, S.
    et al.
    Flinders University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia .
    Getz, D.
    University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada .
    Pettersson, Robert
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Wallstam, Martin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Event evaluation: Definitions, concepts and a state of the art review2015In: International Journal of Event and Festival Management, ISSN 1785-2954, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 135-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to define event evaluation, develop a conceptual model of its process and elements, review pertinent literature, and draw conclusions pertaining both to the discourse on evaluation and its praxis. Design/methodology/approach – General review of literature and development of a conceptual model of the evaluation process. Findings – The review suggests that impact assessments have dominated, but are only one type of evaluation; research and papers on evaluating the worth of events has been minimal, while those on the evaluation of various management and marketing functions is fragmented. Research limitations/implications – It is concluded that little has been written about evaluation paradigms and systems, although the discourse on sustainability and triple bottom line accountability has led to a greater emphasis on non-economic considerations. Originality/value – The conceptual model of the evaluation process and its components offers a systematic approach to shaping evaluation discourse and methods. Conclusions are drawn on how to advance evaluation research and methods applied to events. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 65.
    Bryksin, Irina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Measuring the Effectiveness of the "I Amsterdam" Brand with Consumer Based Brand Equity2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 66.
    Cetin, Gurel
    et al.
    Department of Tourism Management, Istanbul University, Turkey.
    Alrawadieh, Zaid
    Istanbul University, Turkey.
    Zeki Dincer, Mithat
    Istanbul University, Turkey.
    Istanbullu Dincer, Fusun
    Istanbul University, Turkey.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Willingness to pay for tourist tax in destinations: Empirical evidence from Istanbul2017In: Economies, ISSN 2227-7099, Vol. 5, no 2, article id 21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Revenue generated from tourism taxes constitutes an important financial resource for local governments and tourism authorities to both ensure tourism sustainability and enhance the quality of tourist experiences. In order for tourism policy makers to create an efficient and fair tax system in tourism destinations, it is crucial to understand travelers’ perceptions concerning willingness to pay (WTP), tax rates, and their optimal allocation. The objectives of this paper, therefore, are to evaluate tourism taxes as a compensation tool to cover the costs of tourism and to measure tourists’ WTP. The paper also suggests a fair allocation of tax revenues based on tourists’ perceptions. A qualitative approach was used and data were collected through semi-structured in-depth interviews with international travelers to Istanbul, Turkey. The findings suggest that tourists are more likely to pay an additional amount of tax when this is earmarked for improvements in their experiences, but they are reluctant to take on liability concerning matters relating to destination sustainability. Based on the travelers’ perceptions, the paper also identified areas that need investment to improve tourist experiences. An interesting highlight of this paper is that the majority of surveyed respondents reported that their travel decisions would not be negatively affected even if the total cost of their vacation increased by one third. The findings are expected to offer fresh and much-needed insights into tourist taxation for tourism policy makers and stakeholders.

  • 67.
    Cetin, Gurel
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography. Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Yarcan, Sukru
    Nisantasi University, Istanbul, Turkey.
    The professional relationship between tour guides and tour operators2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 345-357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tour operators and tour guides are major stakeholders during production and operation of organized package tours. However, the relationship between them received little attention in tourism literature. This study intends to identify the dimensions of the relationship between the two parties and importance attained to different guiding roles both by tour operators and guides. It also explores the attitude gaps between tour operators and guides on various guiding attributes. The analyzed data were collected from 110 professional tour guides and 56 inbound tour operators. Numerous differences in perceptions were identified regarding importance attained to foreign language skills, group cohesion, holiday experience creation, entertainment, representation skills, contract compliance, image creation, itinerary compliance and identification with tour operators.

  • 68.
    Chekalina, Tatiana
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    A Value Co-Creation Perspective on Customer-Based Brand Equity Modelling for Tourism Destinations: A case from Sweden2015Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Tourism destinations all over the world increasingly embrace marketing and branding practices traditionally utilized by businesses. However, the literature on customer-based brand equity modelling and measurement for tourism destinations lacks the conceptual understanding of the complex relationships between tourists and the destination brand.

    Therefore, the thesis at hand addresses the existing gap in tourism literature and aims at contributing to the development of the customer-based brand equity concept in a tourism destination setting (CBDBE) by taking into account the value-co-creation approach. The components of the proposed model consist of the customers’ evaluation of the destination promise in terms of transforming functional, intangible and social destination resources into tourists’ value-in-use. Furthermore, the positive relationship between visitors’ perception of the destination and value-for-money discloses the input of tourists’ own resources into the process of value-co-creation. Moreover, destination brand awareness affects the evaluation of the destination promise, which, in turn, determines tourists’ behavioural intentions towards the destination.

    By implementing web-based customer surveys and using a linear structural equation modelling approach, the proposed model is empirically validated for the leading Swedish mountain destination Åre. First, the model is repeatedly tested with data regarding the winter seasons 2009/10 and 2012/13.  Second, the proposed CBDBE model has been operationalized and tested also for the summer season. Findings from face-to-face interviews conducted in Åre during summer 2012 uncovered the relationships between destination resources offered in Åre, tourists’ own resources and destination value-in-use and, thus, served as the empirical fundament for the development of a destination-specific scale to measure value-in-use. Subsequently, the proposed CBDBE model has been successfully tested with web-based survey data collected after the summer season 2012, both for the total sample and separately for the main a priori tourist segments, including hiking, mountain biking and village tourists.

    Results show the significant contribution of destination value-in-use defined as perceived benefits from a destination stay, which, in turn, strongly affect customers’ destination loyalty. In contrast, the relationship between value-for-money and destination loyalty is less strong and even non-significant for the two customer segments hiking and mountain biking tourists. Importantly, as part of the CBDBE model operationalization, the thesis highlights the need to better understand destination-specific consumption patterns across various tourism segments by destination managers.

    Therefore, results demonstrate that by monitoring unique destination and tourist-specific experience dimensions, destination management can influence and better manage both the value-in-use for customers and customer loyalty. Thus, the proposed CBDBE model provides destination managers with a tool, which enables evaluation and upgrade of destination marketing strategy and, finally, assist in discovering promising innovation potentials for highly experiential tourism products.

  • 69.
    Chekalina, Tatiana
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Fuchs, Matthias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Mobile apps as nature-based tourism experience facilitator: A conceptual framework2018In: The 9th International Conference on Monitoring and Management of Visitors in Recreational and Protected Areas (MMV9): ABSTRACT BOOK / [ed] Jeoffrey Dehez, 2018, p. 243-245Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Chekalina, Tatiana
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Fuchs, Matthias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Lexhagen, Maria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    A value co-creation perspective on customer-based brand equity model for tourism destinations: A Case from Sweden2014In: Finnish Journal of Tourism Research (Matkailututkimus), ISSN 1796-1300, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 8-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims at contributing to the development of the customer-based brand equity (CBBE) concept in a tourism destination setting by taking into account the value-co-creation approach. The components of the proposed model consist of the customers’ evaluation of the destination promise in terms of transforming tangible, intangible and social destination resources into tourists’ value-in-use. Moreover, destination brand awareness affects the evaluation of the destination promise, which, in turn, determines tourists’ behavioural intentions towards the destination. By implementing a web survey and using a linear structural equation modelling approach, the proposed model is empirically validated for the Swedish mountain destination of Åre. Results particularly show the significant contribution of customer benefits and value for money to create destination loyalty. The paper demonstrates that by monitoring unique destination and tourist-specific experience dimensions, destination management can control both the value-in-use for a customer and customer loyalty, thereby upgrade and evaluate its marketing strategy, and, finally, discover promising innovation potentials for highly experiential tourism products.

  • 71.
    Chekalina, Tatiana
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Fuchs, Matthias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Lexhagen, Maria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Customer-based destination brand equity modelling: The role of destination resources, value-for money and value-in-use2018In: Journal of Travel Research, ISSN 0047-2875, E-ISSN 1552-6763, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 31-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study contributes to the development of knowledge on transferring the concept of customer-based brand equity to a tourism destination context. Keller’s (2009) brand equity pyramid is utilized as the comparison framework to reveal similarities but also overlaps, differences and gaps on both the conceptual and measurement level of existing brand equity models for destinations. Particularly, the inner core of the model depicts the complex mechanisms of how destination resources transform into benefits for tourists overlooked by prior research. This study proposes a customer-based brand equity model for destinations, which consists of five dependent constructs, including awareness, loyalty, and three destination brand promise constructs constituting the inner core of the model, namely, destination resources, value-in-use and value-for-money. The model was repeatedly tested for the leading Swedish mountain destination Åre, by using a linear structural equation modelling approach. Findings confirm the path structure of the proposed model.

  • 72.
    Chekalina, Tatiana
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Fuchs, Matthias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Lexhagen, Maria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Destination brand promise: The core of customer-based brand equity modeling2018In: Tourism Analysis, ISSN 1083-5423, E-ISSN 1943-3999, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 93-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study contributes to the discussion on transferring the concept of customer-based brand equity (CBBE) to a tourism destination context. The core component of the proposed CBBE model for tourism destinations (CBDBE) considers customers’ evaluation of the destination promise in terms of the transformation of destination resources into value-in-use for tourists. The introduced CBDBE model consists of six interdependent constructs, including awareness, tourists’ perception of functional, tangible and social destination resources, value-in-use disclosing the purpose and benefits of consumption, value-for-money, satisfaction and loyalty. The model was tested for the leading Swedish mountain destination Åre for the summer season by using customer-based survey data and a linear structural equation modelling (SEM) approach. Findings confirm the hypothesized relationships and the hierarchical structure of the proposed model. Managerial implications are discussed and the agenda for future CBDBE research is outlined.

  • 73.
    Chekalina, Tatiana
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Fuchs, Matthias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Lexhagen, Maria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Determinants of the co-created destination experience: an empirical validation from Sweden2013In: Tourism Marketing: On Both Sides of the Counter / [ed] M. Kozak, L. Andreu, J. Gnoth, S. Sibila Lebe, A. Fyall, Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2013, p. 57-79Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 74.
    Chekalina, Tatiana
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Fuchs, Matthias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Lexhagen, Maria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Fulfilment of destination brand promise: the core of customer-based brand equity modelling for tourism destinations2015In: Tourism engagement: co-creating well-being: Proceedings of the 6th Advances in Tourism Marketing Conference, Joensuu, Finland, 8.-10.9.2015 / [ed] Pesonen, Juho & Komppula, Raija, 2015, p. 114-118Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 75.
    Chekalina, Tatiana
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Fuchs, Matthias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Lexhagen, Maria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Margaryan, Lucine
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Measuring Customer-Based Brand Equity for Tourism Destinations - Understanding Missing Value Patterns for Tangible Destination Resources2013In: / [ed] Altinay, L., Jauhari, V., Vong, F. & Uysal, M, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 76.
    Chekalina, Tatiana
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Lexhagen, Maria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Fuchs, Matthias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Understanding the Value in Use of Multi-Segment Destinations: A Summer Season Case of the Swedish Mountain Resort Åre2013In: Marketing Places and Spaces: Shifting Tourist Flows: 5th Advances in Tourism Marketing Conference Proceedings / [ed] A. Correia M. Kozak, J. Gnoth, A. Fyall, S. Lebe, L. Andreu, Vilamoura - Portugal, 2013, p. 365-371Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 77.
    Chen, Changlu
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Social Media and its influence on destination image: tourist satisfaction and behavioral intentions of tourists visiting Shanghai2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 78.
    Chen, Jaqueline
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Chekalina, Tatiana
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Fuchs, Matthias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Social media’s influence on destination image, tourist satisfaction and behavioral intentions2017In: Conference proceedings 7thAdvances in Hospitality and Tourism Marketing and Management (AHTMM) Conference, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 79.
    Chen, Simin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Understanding of the tourist experience at creative arts destination: Case study of Beijing 798 art zone2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 80.
    Conti, Eugenio
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Nature-based tourism and experience value co-creation on Instagram2018In: ISCONTOUR 2018 Tourism Research Perspectives: Proceedings of the International Student Conference in Tourism Research / [ed] Christian Maurer & Barbara Neuhofer, 2018, p. 373-378Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social media and mobile-based applications act as an increasingly critical source of experience value creation in tourism and nature-based tourism, as confirmed by the most recent trends in the industry. Although being one of the most popular mobile-based social media, Instagram is still underrepresented in value creation research, and no study has been conducted specifically in nature-based tourism. Moreover, current research on value lack of interpretive methodologies able to grasp the complexity of experience value creation from a phenomenological point of view. This research aims at tackling these gaps by conducting an in-depth investigation on experience value creation on Instagram in nature-based tourism. A combination of different types of qualitative data, obtained through a participatory netnography, will be collected on Instagram, and consequently triangulated and analyzed by means of grounded theory. While assessing the depth of value creation emerging from personal, elicited tourist narratives, in a way not seen yet in similar studies, the results are argued to expand the theoretical understanding of experience value creation in nature-based tourism and service research.

  • 81.
    Curacica, Michael
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Hot och risker för musikfestivaler i Sverige2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 82.
    Dahlberg, Annika
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Wall-Reinius, Sandra
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Exploring the importance of categories in contemporary conservation debates: the case of a proposed national park in the Swedish mountain region.2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alongside ‘wilderness’ the category ‘national park’ is one of the most powerful within nature conservation. How a category, such as national park including its inherent components, is understood and valued differ between social actors across space and time. This paper aims to look critically at how categories are used and understood by stakeholders with different land-use interests in the southern mountains of Jämtland County, Sweden, specifically in relation to a suggested new national park. Data has been collected through in-depth interviews,surveys, discourse analysis and observations. Results show how our need to use categories, such as ‘nature reserve’, ‘wilderness’ and ‘local community’, at the same time can create problems. For example, the proposed national park is perceived differentlyby different stakeholders, there exists mistrust between them, and the park is contested for several reasons. Categories create paradoxes that lead to tension and conflict, and they often act to block change in both thinking and practice. These effects can occur when a piece of land belongs to different categories, when a category remains static while the local context changes, when the material and immaterial ‘components inherent in landscapes are categorised differently by different users, and when the same category is attributed different values. A lack of awareness of this impedes novel solutions and potential relevant trade-offs. A critical analysis of how categories are formed, by whom, and their effects, are important for understanding and moving beyond conflicts in conservation.

  • 83.
    Danielsson, Erna
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Petridou, Evangelia
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Lundgren, Minna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Olofsson, Anna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Große, Christine
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Systems and Technology.
    Röslmaier, Michael
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Risk Communication: A Comparative Study of Eight EU Countries2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    How do EU member states communicate risks to their citizens? In this study, we define risk communication as the information provided by different levels of government to citizens regarding possible future crises. The questions serving as departure points for this study are as follows: How is the administrative system for risk communication set up in the countries studied? How the different risk communication campaigns are (provided that they exist) embedded in the larger administrative context? How is risk communication strategy formulated in each country and what kind of threats are emphasized? In order to tackle these questions, we examine the risk communication strategy of eight countries: Sweden, Finland, Germany, England, France, Estonia, Greece and Cyprus. Our data consist of governmental web sites, publications, campaigns, as well as other modes of communication, such as videos posted on YouTube, with questions centering on institutional actors, methods of delivery, content, and effectiveness. We acknowledge that risk communication aims at supporting vulnerable populations and evening out imbalances, but at the same time we flesh out the power dimension of risk. In our analysis, we search for reproduction of norms and social inequality in risk communication practices. The results show that some patterns emerge regarding the way different EU countries convey information to the public, but they do not hold strictly to geography or administrative system. Digital media are the foremost vehicle of risk communication and the message generally conveyed is geared towards traditional, middle class households with the main language of the country as their first language. Volunteer organizations are present in all the countries in question, though not at the same degree. The conveyance of “self-protection” guidelines implicitly places the responsibility of protection to the individual. The results also show that in some countries, materiality has become more prevalent than the social dimension of risk in the message the public sector conveys, and that there is a move from focusing on risk to focusing on security.

  • 84.
    Danielsson, Sandra
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Henriksson, Victoria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Terrorism och turism delar på medias uppmärksamhet: En diskursanalys över hur media använder turism tillsammans med terrorism i sin mediabevakning efter en terrorattack2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 85.
    Darolf, Sebastian
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Ekberg, Adam
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Stora återkommande sportevenemangs sociala effekter på mindre orter: En fallstudie av Vasaloppet och Mora2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 86.
    de Esteban, Javier
    et al.
    Rey Juan Carlos University, Spain.
    Cetin, Gurel
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography. Istanbul University.
    Antonovica, Arta
    Rey Juan Carlos University, Spain.
    Theory of knowledge of tourism: A sociological and epistemological reflection2015In: Journal of Tourismology, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 2-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyses theoretical problems in the study of tourism and reviews some major thoughts and literature as well as tourism as an emerging discipline. Tourism as a scientific discipline still does not haveits own and established academic body that distinguishes it from other sciences. Therefore, tourism as a recent field of research is struggling without being understood in the correct way because its theory of knowledge is not delimited and tries to be reflected from the point of view of its formal components. In this sense, the principal aim of this article is to try to delimit the perspectives and definitions of the main authors that have contributed tothe "tourism theory" in general until now, by focusing on several dimensions such us: positivism, materialism, neo-durkheimism, functionalism and post-modernism. 

  • 87.
    De Jong, Anna
    et al.
    University of Surrey, Guildford, UK.
    Palladino, Monica
    Mediterranea University of Reggio Calabria, Reggio Calabria, Italy.
    Puig, Romà Garrido
    University of Girona, Girona, Spain.
    Romeo, Giuseppa
    Mediterranea University of Reggio Calabria, Reggio Calabria, Italy.
    Fava, Nadia
    University of Girona, Girona, Spain.
    Cafiero, Carlo
    Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome, Italy.
    Skoglund, Wilhelm
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Business, Economics and Law.
    Varley, Peter
    Western Norway Research Institute, Sogndal, Norway.
    Marcianò, Claudio
    Mediterranea University of Reggio Calabria, Reggio Calabria, Italy.
    Laven, Daniel
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Sjölander-Lindqvist, Annelie
    University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Gastronomy Tourism: An Interdisciplinary Literature Review of Research Areas, Disciplines, and Dynamics2018In: Journal of Tourism and Gastronomy, ISSN 2169-2971, E-ISSN 2169-298X, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 131-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Residing with the exponential growth of gastronomy tourism research, a number of review articles have examined the relationship of gastronomy and tourism from distinct thematic and disciplinary perspectives. What remains absent is a comprehensive overview that encapsulates the interdisciplinary dimensions of this area of research. In response, this study comprehensively investigates gastronomy tourism literature utilizing a network and content analysis, with an aim to map the main subject areas concerned with gastronomy tourism and relations between varying subject areas. In doing so, themes determining gastronomy tourism and focus for future exploration are identified. The review findings suggest that the trajectory of gastronomy tourism research is characterized by the dominance of "tourism, leisure, and hospitality management" and "geography, planning, and development." Three recommendations are proposed to assist development of gastronomy tourism research: increased dialogue across subject areas, development of critical and theoretical approaches, and greater engagement with sustainability debates.

  • 88.
    de la Barre, Suzanne
    et al.
    Umeå Universitet.
    Brouder, Patrick
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Consuming Stories: Placing Food in the Arctic Tourism Experience2013In: Journal of Heritage Tourism, ISSN 1743-873X, E-ISSN 1747-6631, Vol. 8, no 2-3, p. 213-223Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 89.
    Dietz, Michelle
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Planning and implementation of sustainable nature-based tourism events: The case of Fjällräven Classic2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 90.
    Diniz Vieira, Otávio Augusto
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Developing Edu-Tourism In An Urban Indigenous Community: The Case Of Aldeia Bananal (Brasília – DF – Brazil)2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This work aims at developing a tourist visit to the Aldeia Bananal, a community located in Brasília, the Brazilian capital. The community is composed of three ethnic indian groups: Kariri-Xokó, Tuxá and Fulni-ô. The reason of the study is to research and develop Indigenous Tourism. Furthermore, I also wanted to evaluate the present and future benefits to the students and to the indigenous community of a project which relates Indigenous and Educational Tourism. The thesis describes three visits from public school children organized by the government and the official visit organized by me together with the leader Cacique Tanoné. The visitors or student-tourists were mainly from the 4th semester of a Tourism bachelor course. While developing the Educational Tourism visit we mostly focused on three concepts: Geotourism, which tries to enhance the cultural and natural characteristics of the indigenous group through participatory tourism; Ambience Generation, which relates to changing the learning environment of the students as a mean of catalyzing their educational process; and Staged-Authenticity for Community Empowerment. The thesis is developed in three phases: first, the description of the area; second, the development of the visit together with the community; and last the analysis of the visit based on the community leader’s and the students’ view. The most important fact that affects the community’s daily life and consequently the present tourist visitations is the construction – started in 2007 – around their land of the newest and most expensive neighborhood in Brasília, the Northwest Sector. Some conclusions of this study were: the community was at all times very positive towards the research; they received a fair amount of money and were satisfied with it; they spread their culture in a tense political moment; and enhanced their cultural heritage, although I think the visit did not enhance the natural environment as it could. For the students the project created a unique contact with the indigenous group which led to a higher knowledge and valorization of their culture; it also showed a practical example of indigenous tourism to Tourism students. The data did answer the question regarding to the benefits to the students and to the community; and the method for developing and evaluating an indigenous tourism practice is still in progress and can reach an ideal level with further research.

  • 91.
    Eber, Zoe Fanni
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Baggio, Rodolfo
    Bocconi University, Italy; National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russia.
    Fuchs, Matthias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Hyperlink network analysis of a multi destination region: The case of Halland, South Sweden2018In: Information Technology & Tourism, ISSN 1098-3058, E-ISSN 1943-4294, Vol. 20, no 1-4, p. 181-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past years, attention has been given to the relevance of network studies as an analytical tool to assess essential features of a tourism destination. This work analyzes the network of Halland County, a tourism destination in South Sweden. The study aims at enhancing the body of knowledge and the comprehension of the structural characterization of the tourism network, deriving indications for policy makers and local stakeholders in order to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the regional tourism system. Tourism stakeholders’ websites were explored using hyperlink network analysis (Baggio, 2007; Raisi et al., 2017). Findings highlight the need for strengthened industry ties and contribute to the industry-wide discussion on exploring network topology as a key source of knowledge for destination management and development, respectively.

  • 92.
    Edberg, Mattias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Åre sportfiskedestination.: Varför besöker sportfiskaren Åre.2015Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 5 credits / 7,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 93.
    Elmroth, Stefan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Enhancing Rural Transport Accessibility in Jämtland Härjedalen2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 94.
    Eriksson, Therese
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Valkonen, Amanda
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Upplevelsebaserad wellnessturism i Jämtland Härjedalen: Ett explorativt aktörsperspektiv2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 95.
    Eriksson, Tove
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Svensson, Nathalie
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Ett destinationsbolags betydelse: En fallstudie av Destination South Lapland2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 96.
    Evertsson, Erik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Ökad Fisketurism: En B-uppsats om en ledande väg till visionen år 2020 av fördubblad fisketurism2015Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 5 credits / 7,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 97.
    Fellman, Sara
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Sustainable Food Tourism: A Case Study on the Åland Islands2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 98.
    Ferm, Maria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Hållbar turism på Kolmårdens djurpark2014Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 99.
    Fornas, Emily
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Sjöstad, Ellinor
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Könsmakten i det turistifierade rummet: Relationen mellan manliga turister och kvinnliga servitriser i restaurangbranschen2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 100.
    Forslin, Rebecka
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Könsordning på Sällskapsresan: En studie om manligt och kvinnligt i turistisk populärkultur2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
1234567 51 - 100 of 395
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf