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  • 301.
    Zhang, Renyun
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Alecrim, Viviane
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andres, Britta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Forsberg, Sven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Mattias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Thermally reduced kaolin-graphene oxide nanocomposites for gas sensing2015In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, p. Art. no. 7676-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Highly sensitive graphene-based gas sensors can be made using large-area single layer graphene, but the cost of large-area pure graphene is high, making the simpler reduced graphene oxide (rGO) an attractive alternative. To use rGO for gas sensing, however, require a high active surface area and slightly different approach is needed. Here, we report on a simple method to produce kaolin-graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposites and an application of this nanocomposite as a gas sensor. The nanocomposite was made by binding the GO flakes to kaolin with the help of 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). The GO flakes in the nanocomposite were contacting neighboring GO flakes as observed by electron microscopy. After thermal annealing, the nanocomposite become conductive as showed by sheet resistance measurements. Based on the conductance changes of the nanocomposite films, electrical gas sensing devices were made for detecting NH3 and HNO3. These devices had a higher sensitivity than thermally annealed multilayer GO films. This kaolin-GO nanocomposite might be useful in applications that require a low-cost material with large conductive surface area including the demonstrated gas sensors.

  • 302.
    Zhang, Renyun
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Andersson, Mattias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andres, Britta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Edlund, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Edström, Per
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Edvardsson, Sverker
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Forsberg, Sven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Johansson, Niklas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Karlsson, Kristoffer
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Nilsson, Hans-Erik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Norgren, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Olsen, Martin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Uesaka, Tetsu
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Öhlund, Thomas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Soap-film coating: High-speed deposition of multilayer nanofilms2013In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 3, p. Art. no. 1477-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The coating of thin films is applied in numerous fields and many methods are employed for the deposition of these films. Some coating techniques may deposit films at high speed; for example, ordinary printing paper is coated with micrometre-thick layers of clay at a speed of tens of meters per second. However, to coat nanometre thin films at high speed, vacuum techniques are typically required, which increases the complexity of the process. Here, we report a simple wet chemical method for the high-speed coating of films with thicknesses at the nanometre level. This soap-film coating technique is based on forcing a substrate through a soap film that contains nanomaterials. Molecules and nanomaterials can be deposited at a thickness ranging from less than a monolayer to several layers at speeds up to meters per second. We believe that the soap-film coating method is potentially important for industrial-scale nanotechnology.

  • 303.
    Zhang, Renyun
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Mattias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Andres, Britta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Edström, Per
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Edvardsson, Sverker
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Forsberg, Sven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Johansson, Niklas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Kalsson, Kristoffer
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Nilsson, Hans-Erik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Olsen, Martin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Öhlund, Thomas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    High-speed deposition of multilayer nanofilms using soap-film coating2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-speed deposition of multilayer nanofilms using soap-film coating

    Renyun Zhang, Henrik A. Andersson, Mattias Andersson, Britta Andres, Per Edström, Sverker Edvardsson, Sven Forsberg, Magnus Hummelgård, Niklas Johansson, Kristoffer Karlsson, Hans-Erik Nilsson, Martin Olsen, Tetsu Uesaka, Thomas Öhlund & Håkan Olin

    Department of Applied Science and Design, Mid Sweden University, SE-85170 Sundsvall, Sweden

    Email: renyun.zhang@miun.se or hakan.olin@miun.se

    Coating1 of thin films is of importance for making functionalized surfaces with applications in many fields from electronics to consumer packaging. To decrease the cost, large scale roll-to-roll2 coating techniques are usually done at high speed, for example, ordinary printing paper is coated at a speed of tens of meters per second by depositing micrometer thick layers of clay. However, nanometer thin films are harder to coat at high speed by wet-chemical methods, requiring special roll-to-roll vacuum techniques3 with the cost of higher complexity.

    Here, we report a simple wet chemical method for high-speed coating of films down to molecular thicknesses, called soap-film coating (SFC)4. The technique is based on forcing a substrate through a soap film that contains nanomaterials. In the simplest laboratory version, the films can be deposited by a hand-coating procedure set up in a couple of minutes. The method is quite general molecules or nanomaterials or sub-micrometer materials (Figure 1) with thicknesses ranging from less than a monolayer to several layers at speeds up to meters per second. The applications of soap-film coating is quite wide an we will show solar cells, electrochromic devices, optical nanoparticle crystals, and nano-film devices. We believe that the soap-film coating method is potentially important for industrial-scale nanotechnology.

    Fig. 1. Soap film coating of nanoparticles, layered materials, nanowires, and molecules. a sub-monolayer 240 nm silica nanoparticle (scale bar 2 µm) b monolayer c double layer. d monolayer gold nanoparticles. e single layer TiO2 nanoparticles. f sub-monolayer polystyrene (scale 2 µm), g monolayer of polystyrene. h triple-layer of polystyrene. i monolayer of Ferritin.  j AFM image of <1.5 layer GO film (3 µm x 2 µm). k clay on glass (scale 2 µm). l SFC coated nanocellulose. m Absorbance spectra Rhodamine B on a glass slide. AFM of SDS layers n (2 µm x 1.5 µm) and o (20 µm x 15 µm).

    References

    1. Tracton, A. A. Coating Technology Handbook (CRC Press, Boca Raton, 2006).

    2. Ohring, M. Materials science of thin films. (Academic press., 2001).

    3. Charles, B. Vacuum deposition onto webs, films and foils. (William Andrew, 2011).

    Zhang, R. Y., Andersson, H. A., Andersson, M., Andres, B., Edström, P., Edvardsson, S., Forsberg, S., Hummelgård, M., Johansson, N., Karlsson, K., Nilsson, H.-E., Olsen, M., Uesaka, T., Öhlund, T., Olin H. Soap film coating: High-speed deposition of multilayer nanofilms. Submitted.

  • 304.
    Zhang, Renyun
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olsen, Martin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Edvardsson, Sverker
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Nilsson, Hans-Erik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Piezoelectric gated ZnO nanowire diode studied by in situ TEM probing2014In: Nano Energy, ISSN 2211-2855, Vol. 3, p. 10-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The piezoelectricity of ZnO nanowires has shown rising interests during the last few years and fields such as piezotronics and piezophotonics are emerging with a number of applications and devices. One such device is the piezoelectric gated ZnO nanowire diode, where the p–n junction is replaced by a dynamically created potential barrier created simply by bending the otherwise homogeneously doped nanowire. To further study this type of diode we used in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) probing, where one electrode was fixed at the end of a ZnO nanowire and another moveable electrode was used both for bending and contacting the wire. Thereby we were able to further characterise this diode and found that the diode characteristics depended on whether the contact was made to the stretched (p-type) surface or to the compressed (n-type) surface of the wire. When the neutral line of the wire contacted, between the stretched and the compressed side, the I–V characteristics were independent on the current direction. The performance of the diodes upon different bending intensity showed a rectifying ratio up to the high value of 60:1. The diode ideality factor was found to be about 5. Moreover, the reverse breakdown voltages of the diode were measured and a local but permanent damage to the diode action was found when the voltage went over the reverse breakdown voltage. 

  • 305.
    Zhang, Renyun
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Carlsson, Fredrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Edman, Mattias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Jonsson, Bengt-Gunnar
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Bylund, Dan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Escherichia coli Bacteria Develop Adaptive Resistance to Antibacterial ZnO Nanoparticles2018In: Advanced Biosystem, ISSN 2366-7478, Vol. 2, no 5, article id 1800019Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibacterial agents based on nanoparticles (NPs) have many important applications, e.g., for the textile industry, surface disinfection, wound dressing, water treatment, and food preservation. Because of their prevalent use it is important to understand whether bacteria could develop resistance to such antibacterial NPs similarly to the resistance that bacteria are known to develop to antibiotics. Here, it is reported that Escherichia coli(E. coli) develops adaptive resistance to antibacterial ZnO NPs after several days' exposure to the NPs. But, in contrast to antibiotics‐resistance, the observed resistance to ZnO NPs is not stable—after several days without exposure to the NPs, the bacteria regain their sensitivity to the NPs' antibacterial properties. Based on the analyses it is suggested that the observed resistance is caused by changes in the shape of the bacteria and the expressions of membrane proteins. The findings provide insights into the response of bacteria to antibacterial NPs, which is important to elucidate for designing and evaluating the risk of applications based on antibacterial NPs.

  • 306.
    Zhang, Renyun
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Engholm, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Recent Progress on the Fabrication and Properties of Silver Nanowire-Based Transparent Electrodes2018In: Nanomaterials, ISSN 2079-4991, Vol. 8, no 8, article id 628Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transparent electrodes (TEs) made of metallic nanowires, such as Ag, Au, Cu, and Ni, are attracting increasing attention for several reasons: (1) they can act as a substitute for tin oxide-based TEs such as indium-tin oxide (ITO) and fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO); (2) various methods exist for fabricating such TEs such as filtration, spraying, and Meyer bar coating; (3) greater compatibility with different substrates can be achieved due to the variety of fabrication methods; and (4) extra functions in addition to serving as electrodes, such as catalytic abilities, can be obtained due to the metals of which the TEs are composed. There are a large number of applications for TEs, ranging from electronics and sensors to biomedical devices. This short review is a summary of recent progress, mainly over the past five years, on silver nanowire-based TEs. The focus of the review is on theory development, mechanical, chemical, and thermal stability as well as optical properties. The many applications of TEs are outside the scope of this review.

  • 307.
    Zhang, Renyun
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Engholm, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Örtegren, Jonas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    High-performance transparent and flexible electrodes made by flash-light sintering of gold nanoparticles2018In: ACS Applied Energy Materials, E-ISSN 2574-0962, Vol. 1, no 12, p. 7191-7198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metallic nanowire-based transparent electrodes (TEs) are potential alternatives to indium tin oxide (ITO). To achieve a high performance [sheet resistance (Rs) < 100 Ω/sq, transmittance (T%) > 90%], the nanowires must have a high length-to-diameter (L/D) ratio to minimize the number of wire-to-wire junctions. Attempts to produce TEs with gold nanowires have been made, and the results reveal difficulties in achieving the requirements. A successful strategy involves creating templated gold nanonetworks through multiple procedures. Here, we present a simple and efficient method that uses flash-light sintering of a gold nanonetwork film into gold TEs (Rs: 82.9 Ω/sq, T %: 91.79%) on a thin polycarbonate film (25 μm). The produced gold TEs have excellent mechanical, electrical, optical, and chemical stabilities. Mechanisms of the formation of gold nanonetworks and the effect of flash-light have been analyzed. Our findings provide a scalable process for producing transparent and flexible gold electrodes with a total processing time of less than 8 min without the use of heating, vacuum processing, and organic chemicals and without any material loss. This is possible because all the gold nanoparticles have been aggregated and filtrated on the filter membranes. The area density of gold is 0.094 g/m2 leading low material costs, which is very competitive with the price of commercial TEs.

  • 308.
    Zhang, Renyun
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Forsberg, Viviane
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Engholm, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Öhlund, Thomas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olsen, Martin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Örtegren, Jonas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Photoconductivity of acid exfoliated and flash-light-processed MoS2 films2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 3296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    MoS2 has been studied intensively during recent years as a semiconducting material in several fields, including optoelectronics, for applications such as solar cells and phototransistors. The photoresponse mechanisms of MoS2 have been discussed but are not fully understood, especially the phenomenon in which the photocurrent slowly increases. Here, we report on a study of the photoresponse flash-light-processed MoS2 films of different thicknesses and areas. The photoresponse of such films under different light intensities and bias voltages was measured, showing significant current changes with a quick response followed by a slow one upon exposure to pulsed light. Our in-depth study suggested that the slow response was due to the photothermal effect that heats the MoS2; this hypothesis was supported by the resistivity change at different temperatures. The results obtained from MoS2 films with various thicknesses indicated that the minority-carrier diffusion length was 1.36 mu m. This study explained the mechanism of the slow response of the MoS2 film and determined the effective thickness of MoS2 for a photoresponse to occur. The method used here for fabricating MoS2 films could be used for fabricating optoelectronic devices due to its simplicity.

  • 309.
    Zhang, Renyun
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    A facile one-step method for synthesising a parallelogram-shaped single-crystalline ZnO nanosheet2014In: Materials Science and Engineering: B, ISSN 0921-5107, Vol. 184, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ZnO nanosheets are found to be useful in many fields such as sensors and electronics. Non-uniform- shaped ZnO nanosheets are synthesised using several methods; moreover, uniformly shaped ones are less studied. Here, we report on a simple one-step method to synthesise parallelogram-shaped single- crystalline ZnO nanosheets. By controlling the reaction of Zn(NO3 )2 and hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) in ethanol, average 30 nm-thick nanosheets with a high aspect ratio of 1:100 were obtained. The par- allelogram angles were between 97◦ and 99◦. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) diffraction and X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that the nanosheets were wurtzite-structured single-crystalline ZnO. Moreover, a growth mechanism of these parallelogram nanosheets is suggested based on the experi- mental results. These results suggest a new simple solution process to synthesise uniformly shaped ZnO nanosheets allowing large-scale production to be employed. 

  • 310.
    Zhang, Renyun
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Graphite-carbon nanotube flexible electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cells2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is a low cost and efficient way to transform solar radiation to electricity. Indium tin oxide (ITO) and fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) coated glass are two kinds of transparent electrodes that are mostly used to fabricate DSSCs. However, these two kinds electrodes lack flexibility, limiting their development. [1] Flexible electrodes are desired in DSSC because of they are lightweight, low cost and ro田l-to-roll compatible. There are attempts to replace both [1] or one [2] of the two electrodes in DSSC. However, the efficiencies are relatively low. Here we reported a simple method to fabricate graphite-carbon nanotube (G-CNT) composited flexible electrode for using as counter electrode in DSSC. The electrodes are simple fabricated by reverse filtration and flash sintering, leading to highly flexible (360 °C) and conductive (sheet resistance, 100 Ohm/sq) electrodes that can be used as both catalyzer and current collector. The energy conversion efficiency of such electrode based DSSC can reach 2.02% with fill factor of 0.56 (Figure 1).

     

    Figure 1. Photograph of the G-CNT composited flexible electrode, and the J-V characterization of the fabricated DSSC.

     

     

    References:

     

    [1]    W. Wang, Q. Zhang, H. Li, G. W. Wu, D. C. Zou, D. P. Yu, Adv. Funct. Mater. 2012, 22, 2775-2782.

    [2]    B. Wang, L. L. Kerr, Sol. Energy Mater. Sol. Cells. 2011, 95, 2531-2535.

  • 311.
    Zhang, Renyun
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Nicklas, Blomquist
    Britta, Andres
    The application of papers in energy harvesting and storage2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 312.
    Zhang, Renyun
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olsen, Martin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Örtegren, Jonas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Nanogenerator made of ZnO nanosheet networks2017In: Semiconductor Science and Technology, ISSN 0268-1242, E-ISSN 1361-6641, Vol. 32, no 5, article id 054002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The piezoelectricity of nanomaterials attracts a great deal of attention due to its broad application, including the harvesting of ambient mechanical energy to power small electronics devices. We report here a simple method to fabricate piezoelectric nanogenerators consisting of networks of ZnO nanosheets grown on aluminum (Al) foils, where the Al acts as both a substrate for growth and as an electrode contacting the ZnO network. A second, top electrode was tapped, rolled, or rubbed against the ZnO to generate piezoelectricity. This second electrode was either a copper foil or fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) glass. A piezo voltage of up to 0.924 V was detected during rolling and 6 μA was the highest current observed when rubbing the ZnO film with a FTO glass. Due to its simplicity, this nanogenerator fabrication method has the potential to be scaled up for the industrial production of piezoelectric energy harvesting devices.

  • 313.
    Zhang, Renyun
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Örtegren, Jonas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olsen, Martin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Yang, Ya
    CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, Beijing Institute of Nanoenergy and Nanosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083, P. R. China.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Human body constituted triboelectric nanogenerators as energy harvesters, code transmitters and motion sensors2018In: ACS Applied Energy Materials, ISSN 2574-0962, Vol. 1, no 6, p. 2955-2960Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human skin is a dielectric material that can be used as a triboelectric material for harvesting energy from body motions. The output power of such a human skin-based triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) is relatively low. Here, we assembled high-output human body constituted TENGs (H-TENGs) by taking advantage of the unique electrical properties of the human body, such as high skin impedance, low tissue resistance, body capacitance, and conductivity. The output of a H-TENG can reach 30 W/m2, which is enough to drive small electronic devices, such as a timer or a calculator. The unique feature of the H-TENG is that it can perform the four fundamental modes of TENGs, which has not been reported elsewhere. Such a feature allows the H-TENG to act as a code transmitter to send light and electrical signals, such as Morse code. H-TENGs also benefit the development of high-performance, self-powered body motion sensors. Our findings suggest new strategies for harvesting energy from human body motions, as well as new types of motion sensors and signal senders.

  • 314.
    Zhang, Renyun
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Laser-Etched Stretchable Graphene–Polymer Composite Array for Sensitive Strain and Viscosity Sensors2019In: Nano-Micro Letters, ISSN 2150-5551, Vol. 11, article id 99Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 315.
    Zhang, Renyun
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Porous Gold Films: A Short Review on Recent Progress2014In: Materials, ISSN 1996-1944, E-ISSN 1996-1944, Vol. 7, p. 3834-3854Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Porous gold films have attracted increasing interest over the last ten years due to the unique properties of high specific surface area and electrical conductivity combined with chemical stability and ability to alter the surface chemistry. Several methods have been developed to synthesize porous gold films such as de-alloying, templating, electrochemical, and self-assembling. These porous gold films are used in diverse fields, for example, as electrochemical and Raman sensors or for chemical catalysis. Here, we provide a short review on the progress of porous gold films over the past ten years, including the synthesis and applications of such films.

  • 316.
    Zhang, Renyun
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Olsen, Martin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Christina, Dahlström
    Jonas, Örtegren
    Towards large area energy harvesting using triboelectric nangenerators fabricated with green materials2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 317.
    Zhang, Renyun
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Örtegren, Jonas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olsen, Martin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Harvesting triboelectricity from the human body using non-electrode triboelectric nanogenerators2018In: Nano Energy, ISSN 2211-2855, E-ISSN 2211-3282, Vol. 45, p. 298-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Triboelectrification has been known and discussed since antiquity. Triboelectrification occurs in the human body due to friction between human skin and other materials such as clothing. However, charges on the body have not been harvested to power small electronics. Here, we report for the first time that the electricity generated on the human body due to triboelectrification can be measured and harvested using human body-based non-electrode triboelectric nanogenerators (H-TENGs). The H-TENGs can have an output of up to 3.3 W/m(2) and can spontaneously harvest energy from several people. The functions of the human body in the H-TENGs are analyzed and experimentally proven to be those of a triboelectric material, conductor and capacitor. Our results demonstrate that the triboelectricity generated on a human body can be harvested using H-TENGs and provide scientific insights into body functions that will promote further studies of TENGs.

  • 318.
    Åslund, Pär
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    On failure mechanisms and strength predictions in corrugated board structures2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 319.
    Åslund, Pär
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hernández-Pérez, Adrián
    Hägglund, Rickard
    Isaksson, Per
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    In situ XCT study of failure mechanisms in corrugated boards subjected to out-ofplane compressionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 320.
    Åslund, Pär
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hägglund, Rickard
    SCA R and D Centre, Box 716, SE-851 21 Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Leif
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL 33431, USA .
    Isaksson, Per
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences. Applied Mechanics, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala, Sweden .
    An analysis of strain localization and formation of face wrinkles in edge-wise loaded corrugated sandwich panels using a continuum damage model2015In: International Journal of Solids and Structures, ISSN 0020-7683, E-ISSN 1879-2146, Vol. 56-57, p. 248-257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the compressive failure mechanism in edge-to-edge loaded corrugated sandwich panels. The formation of face wrinkles is specifically considered. A detailed finite element model of face sheets and web core of a sandwich panel was developed to provide insight on the failure mechanism. A gradient enhanced continuum damage theory was implemented to capture length effects caused by the material microstructure including formation of damage in the face sheets and core. Distributions of strains in the face sheets determined from finite element analysis (FEA) are compared to experimentally measured strains. The predicted location and orientation of the face wrinkle, as indicated by high values of the second principal strain, agrees well with experimental observations.Load vs. out-of-plane deflection curves obtained from FEA with the gradient enhanced damage material model are compared to those obtained from a linear-elastic material model and experimentally determined curves. The gradient enhanced solution gives qualitatively better agreement with experimental results, although the magnitudes of strains are less than those determined experimentally.

  • 321.
    Åslund, Pär
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hägglund, Rickard
    SCA R&D Centre, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Leif
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL, United States .
    Isaksson, Per
    Applied Mechanics, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Modeling of global and local buckling of corrugated board panels loaded in edge-to-edge compression2014In: Journal of Sandwich Structures and Materials, ISSN 1099-6362, E-ISSN 1530-7972, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 272-292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Detailed structural nonlinear finite element modeling of a sandwich panel with corrugated core is performed in this study. A simply supported panel is loaded in uniaxial compression well into the regimes of global panel buckling and local face sheet buckling. The highly nonlinear load versus in-plane and out-of-plane displacement responses obtained from finite element analysis agree reasonably well with experimental results, but the model slightly overpredicts the maximum load. The difference between experiments and predictions is attributed to damage of the corrugated paper web introduced during manufacture of the core and corrugated board. Computations of the buckling also results in a slight thickness reduction of the panel for a large range of face and web thicknesses identify lower thickness limits when the web loses its ability to contribute to the compressive strength of the panel. The highly nonlinear response associated with local and global buckling also results in thickness reduction of the panel.

  • 322.
    Öberg, Lisa
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Treeline dynamics in short and long term perspectives: observational and historical evidence from the southern Swedish Scandes2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Treelines in high-mountain regions are constrained by heat deficiency, although the working mechanisms are still not entirely understood. Observational and paleoecological studies on treeline performance may contribute to increased understanding of the treeline phenomenon in general. The present thesis addresses elevational shifts of alpine treelines in the Swedish Scandes. By various analytical tools, the studies embrace widely different temporal scales.

    The concept treeline refers to the elevation (m a.s.l.) at a specific site of the upper individual tree of a certain tree species, at least 2 m tall. All the principal tree species in the Scandes are concerned, i.e. mountain birch (Betula pubescens ssp. czerepanovii), Norway spruce (Picea abies) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris).

    Paper I deals with regional treeline dynamics at more than 100 sites over the past 100 years. Concurrent with temperature rise by c. 1.4 °C over the same period, maximum treeline advances of all species amount to about 200 m. Thus, under ideal conditions, treelines respond in close equilibrium with air temperature evolution. However, over most parts of the landscape, treeline upshifts have been much smaller than 200 m, which relates to the combined action of geomorphology, wind, snow distribution and soil depth. After 1975, the birch has lost its role as the most rapidly advancing tree species, being superseded by pine and spruce.

    Paper II is a short-term (2005/2007-2010/2011) study of mountain birch treeline performance along a regional maritimity-continentality gradient. Upshift by 3.0 yr-1 in the maritime part of the gradient contrasts to retreat by 0.4 m yr-1 in the continental part. In the latter area, earlier and more complete melting of late-lying snow patches has seemingly progressed to a state when soil drought sets back the vigour of existing birches and precludes sexual regeneration and upslope advance of the treeline. In the maritime area, extensive and deep snow packs still exist above the treeline and constrain its position, although some release is taking place in the current warm climate.

    Paper III explores treeline change by phenotypic transformation of old-established stunted and prostrate spruce individuals (krummholz) growing high above the treeline and is based on analyses of radiocarbon-dated megafossils, preserved in the soil underneath clonal groups of spruce. Living spruce clones, which in some cases may date back to the early Holocene (9500 cal. yr BP), suggests that spruce immigrated from “cryptic” ice age refugia much closer to Scandinavia than conventionally thought. As the krummholz form presupposes open and windy habitats, it is inferred that permanently open spots prevailed in the high-mountain landscape even during periods when treelines in general were much higher than today.

    Paper IV reports radiocarbon dates of wood samples, retrieved from newly exposed glacier forefields at three main sites, located high above the modern treelines and embracing the entire Swedish Scandes. It appears that pine colonized early emerging nunataks already during the Late Glacial. Around 9600-9500 cal. yr BP a first massive wave of tree establishment, birch and pine, took place in “empty” glacier cirques. Both species grew 400-600 m above their present day treeline position and accordingly, the summer temperatures may have been 3.5 °C warmer than present (uncorrected for land uplift). During the entire interval 9600 to 4400 cal. yr BP, birch prospered 100-150 m above the uppermost pines. In response to Neoglacial cooling, treelines of both birch and pine descended until their final disappearance from the record 4400 and 5900 cal. yr BP, respectively. Thereafter, these habitats experienced increased snow accumulation and glacier inception.

  • 323.
    Öhlund, Thomas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Metal Films for Printed Electronics: Ink-substrate Interactions and Sintering2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A new manufacturing paradigm may lower the cost and environmental impact of existing products, as well as enable completely new products. Large scale, roll-to-roll manufacturing of flexible electronics and other functionality has great potential. However, a commercial breakthrough depends on a lower consumption of materials and energy compared with competing alternatives, and that sufficiently high performance and reliability of the products can be maintained. The substrate constitutes a large part of the product, and therefore its cost and environmental sustainability are important. Electrically conducting thin films are required in many functional devices and applications. In demanding applications, metal films offer the highest conductivity.

     

    In this thesis, paper substrates of various type and construction were characterized, and the characteristics were related to the performance of inkjet-printed metal patterns. Fast absorption of the ink carrier was beneficial for well-defined pattern geometry, as well as high conductivity. Surface roughness with topography variations of sufficiently large amplitude and frequency, was detrimental to the pattern definition and conductivity. Porosity was another important factor, where the characteristic pore size was much more important than the total pore volume. Apparent surface energy was important for non-absorbing substrates, but of limited importance for coatings with a high absorption rate. Applying thin polymer–based coatings on flexible non-porous films to provide a mechanism for ink solvent removal, improved the pattern definition significantly. Inkjet-printing of a ZnO-dispersion on uncoated paper provided a thin spot-coating, allowing conductivity of silver nanoparticle films. Conductive nanoparticle films could not form directly on the uncoated paper.

     

    The resulting performance of printed metal patterns was highly dependent on a well adapted sintering methodology. Several sintering methods were examined in this thesis, including conventional oven sintering, electrical sintering, microwave sintering, chemical sintering and intense pulsed light sintering. Specially designed coated papers with modified chemical and physical properties, were utilized for chemical low-temperature sintering of silver nanoparticle inks. For intense pulsed light sintering and material conversion of patterns, custom equipment was designed and built. Using the equipment, inkjet-printed copper oxide patterns were processed into highly conducting copper patterns. Custom-designed papers with mesoporous coatings and porous precoatings improved the reliablility and performance of the reduction and sintering process.

     

     

     

     

    The thesis aims to clarify how ink-substrate interactions and sintering methodology affect the performance and reliability of inkjet-printed nanoparticle patterns on flexible substrates. This improves the selection, adaptation, design and manufacturing of suitable substrates for inkjet-printed high conductivity patterns, such as circuit boards or RFID antennas.  

  • 324.
    Öhlund, Thomas
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Sintering Inhibition of Silver Nanoparticle Films via AgCl Nanocrystal Formation2017In: Nanomaterials, ISSN 2079-4991, Vol. 7, no 8, article id 224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrically conductive films are key components in most printed and flexible electronics applications. For the solution processing of conductive films, inks containing silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) remain important because of their relatively easy processing and generally low resistivity after a sintering procedure. Because the commonly used, moderate sintering temperatures of 150-300 °C are still too high for most low-cost flexible substrates, expanding the knowledge of surface-ink interactions that affect the sintering temperature is desirable. It is known that chloride ions can assist the sintering of AgNP films by displacing capping agents on the surfaces of AgNPs. However, very little is known about other possible Cl-AgNP interactions that affect the resistivity and no interaction having the opposite effect (sintering inhibition) has been identified before. Here we identify such a Cl-AgNP interaction giving sintering inhibition and find that the mechanism involves the formation of AgCl nanocrystals within the AgNP film. The AgCl formation was observed after inkjet-printing of AgNP inks with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as the capping agent onto papers with quick-absorbing coatings containing 0.3 wt % KCl. Our findings show that chloride can have opposite roles during sintering, either assisting or inhibiting the sintering depending on the prevalence of AgCl formation. The prevalence of AgCl formation depends on the absorption properties and the capping agent.

  • 325.
    Öhlund, Thomas
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Schuppert, Anna
    Schoeller Technocell GmbH & Co KG, D-49086 Osnabruck, Germany.
    Andres, Britta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Forsberg, Sven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Schmidt, Wolfgang
    Schoeller Technocell GmbH & Co KG, D-49086 Osnabruck, Germany.
    Nilsson, Hans-Erik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Andersson, Mattias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Zhang, Renyun
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Assisted sintering of silver nanoparticle inkjet inks on paper with active coatings2015In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 5, p. 64841-64849Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inkjet-printed metal films are important within the emerging field of printed electronics. For large-scale manufacturing, low-cost flexible substrates and low temperature sintering is desired. Tailored coated substrates are interesting for roll-to-roll fabrication of printed electronics, since a suitable tailoring of the ink-substrate system may reduce, or remove, the need for explicit sintering. Here we utilize specially designed coated papers, containing chloride as an active sintering agent. The built-in sintering agent greatly assists low-temperature sintering of inkjet-printed AgNP films. Further, we examine the effect of variations in coating pore size and precoating type. Interestingly, we find that the sintering is substantially affected by these parameters.

  • 326.
    Öhlund, Thomas
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Schuppert, Anna
    Institut Charles Gerhardt de Montpellier, France.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Bäckström, Joakim
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Nilsson, Hans-Erik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Inkjet Fabrication of Copper Patterns for Flexible Electronics: Using Paper with Active Precoatings2015In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 7, no 33, p. 18273-18282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low-cost solution-processing of highly conductive films is important for the expanding market of printed electronics. For roll-to-roll manufacturing, suitable flexible substrates and compatible postprocessing are essential. Here, custom-developed coated papers are demonstrated to facilitate the inkjet fabrication of high performance copper patterns. The patterns are fabricated in ambient conditions using water-based CuO dispersion and intense pulsed light (IPL) processing. Papers using a porous CaCO3 precoating, combined with an acidic mesoporous absorption coating, improve the effectiveness and reliability of the IPL process. The processing is realizable within 5 ms, using a single pulse of light. A resistivity of 3.1 ± 0.12 μΩ·cm is achieved with 400 μm wide conductors, corresponding to more than 50% of the conductivity of bulk copper. This is higher than previously reported results for IPL-processed copper.

  • 327.
    Öhmark, Sara
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Winter browsing by moose and hares in subarctic birch forest: Scale dependency and responses to food addition2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite their difference in body size and morphology, the moose (Alces alces) andthe mountain hare (Lepus timidus) sustain themselves during winter on similar plantspecies and plant parts in in subarctic environments, namely apical twigs ofmountain birch (Betula pubescens ssp. czerepanovii). Herbivores must select areas anditems of food that provide sufficient intake rates and food nutritional quality whilebalancing this against their intake of dietary fiber and potentially detrimental plantsecondary metabolites. This selection takes place simultaneously at multiple spatialscales, from individual plants and plant parts to patches of food and parts of the wider landscape. While the herbivores must consider their need for food to sustaindaily activities, for body growth and reproduction it is also necessary to avoid predators and harsh environmental conditions. For managers, an understanding of key factors for animal foraging distributions is pivotal to reach intended goals ofmanagement and conservation plans. Knowledge in this area is also important formodels to make accurate predictions of foraging responses of herbivores to resource distributions. The mountain birch forest displays a naturally heterogeneous distribution of trees and shrubs which presents herbivores with a challenge to findgood feeding areas. In an investigation of the spatial distribution of moose browsing on birch and willows (Salix spp.) in two winter seasons separated in time by 14 years,it was found that moose browsing patterns in 1996 were correlated to those observed in 2010. It was also found that moose browsing was spatially clustered within the same distances (1000-2500 m) as densities of willow and birch, but at other spatial scales, browsing was mostly randomly distributed. It was concluded that foragedensity is a cue for moose but only at certain spatial scales. Similarly, a comparison of foraging distribution by hare and moose showed that high birch density was a key factor for both species. In spite of this, hares and moose used different parts ofthe same environment because they respond to food resource distribution at different spatial scales. Hares fed from smaller plants, and focused their foraging activity on smaller spatial scales than moose. These results emphasize the importance of taking into account the distribution of food resources at spatial scales relevant for each species in plans for conservation and management. In an experimental study it was found that intensified browsing on natural forage by mountain hares can be induced locally through placement of food. The induced browsing varied with the amount and quality of the added food, but also with thedensity of natural food plants and natural foraging distribution by hares. Finally, ina last experiment habitat preference of mountain hares across edges between open and forested areas was studied. The results were not consistent; hares utilized baitto a greater extent within forested areas than bait placed on a nearby lake ice, butbait on mires and heaths was either preferred over bait in nearby forest, or utilizedto a similar extent. A possible explanation is that hares have knowledge of their environment such that both forested areas and subarctic mires and heaths are partof its natural home range, whilst the extreme environment on the lake ice is not. During recent decades arctic areas have had an increase in vegetation density andwill be affected by future climate warming and therefore, factors that determineforaging ecology of key herbivores need to be identified. This thesis sheds some light on these factors in relation to spatial scale and forage distribution for two high profile herbivores in the subarctic.

  • 328.
    Öhmark, Sara
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Palo, Thomas
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Wildlife Fish & Environm Studies, S-90183 Umea, Sweden.
    Iason, Glenn
    James Hutton Inst, Aberdeen AB15 8QH, Scotland, UK.
    Spatially segregated foraging patterns of moose (Alces alces) and mountain hare (Lepus timidus) in a subarctic landscape: different tables in the same restaurant?2015In: Canadian Journal of Zoology, ISSN 0008-4301, E-ISSN 1480-3283, Vol. 93, no 5, p. 391-396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Differences in body sizes of mountain hares (Lepus timidus L., 1758) and moose (Alces alces (L., 1758)) affect their abilityto perceive and respond to environmental heterogeneity and plant density. Therefore, we expect these species to show nicheseparation at different scales in the same environment. Results showed that the numbers of mountain birches (Betula pubescenssubsp. czerepanovii L.) browsed by moose per unit area was inversely related to hare browsing. Moose browsed larger birchescompared with hares, and while hares targeted areas with high birch densities regardless of tree sizes, moose preferentiallybrowsed areas with high densities of large birches. Moose browsing was clustered at spatial intervals of 1000–1500 m, while harebrowsing was clustered at intervals of less than 500 m. Willows (genus Salix L.) in the study area were heavily browsed by moose,while few observations of hare browsing on willow were made. Regarding both hare and moose, numbers of birch stems withnew browsing per sample plot were positively correlated with the numbers of birch stems with old browsing, indicating thathare and moose preferred the same foraging sites from year to year. These findings have implications for management of thespecies because they show the importance of scale and landscape perspectives in planning and actions.

  • 329.
    Örtegren, Jonas
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Lundberg, Anna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Ink -Media Interaction: Aggregation Of Color Pigments By Salt With Different Valency And Impact On Print Quality2014In: International Conference on Digital Printing Technologies, The Society for Imaging Science and Technology, 2014, p. 437-439Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We previously reported on the effect of surface properties on inkjet print quality and print functionality. Printing can furthermore be used to effectively functionalize paper surfaces or to modify surface properties of paper for subsequent inkjet printing. Migration of molecules and particles from the paper surface may cause destabilization of the pigment dispersion and result in aggregation of pigments, as shown previously for different concentrations of calcium chloride at the surface of uncoated paper. In this work, utilizing standardized methods such as inkjet printing, ink draw down and print density measurements, it is shown that surface functionalisation using di- and trivalent salts may effectively destabilize a pigment dispersion, causing aggregation of pigments which in turn has a major impact on the print quality.

4567 301 - 329 of 329
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