miun.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bäck, Lena
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Confidence in Midwifery: Midwifery students and midwives’ perspectives2018Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A confident midwife has an impact on a pregnant woman’s clinical outcome and birth experience. Knowledge acquisition, competence, and confidence develops over a lifetime and is of great importance in developing and forming personal skills and allowing the personal traits to grow and mature. Previous international studies have shown that midwifery students do not feel confident in many areas in which they are supposed to practice independently. The aim of this thesis was to investigate confidence levels in basic midwifery skills in Swedish midwifery students in their final semester just before entering the midwifery profession. An additional aim was to describe clinical midwives’ reflections about learning and what factors that developes professional competence, and confidence.

    Study I was a cross-sectional survey with Swedish midwifery students (n=238). They assessed their own confidence in all competencies that a midwife should have and could practice independently. The results of study I confirmed that Swedish midwifery students feel confident in dealing with the most common procedures during normal pregnancy, childbirth, and postpartum and newborn care. However, they do not feel fully confident in cases in which there are deviations from the normal procedures and obstetric emergencies. When comparing groups of midwifery students, the younger group of midwifery students felt more confident in general compared to the older group. Students at a university with a medical faculty were also more confident than the students at a university without a medical faculty.

    In study II, focus group discussions were held with 14 midwives emphasizing the way in which midwives reflect on learning and the development of competence and confidence. Content analysis was used to analyze the focus group discussions. Four categories were identified as a result of study II: 1.) feelings of professional safety evolve over time; 2.) personal qualities affect professional development; 3.) methods for knowledge and competence expansion; and 4.) competence as developing and demanding. The conclusion of this thesis is that more practical and clinical training during education is desirable. Midwifery students need to have access and the opportunity to practice obstetrical emergencies within a team of obstetricians and pediatricians. Learning takes time, and one improvement is to extend midwifery education to include and increase in clinical training. This would strengthen the students theoretical, scientific, and clinical confidence. Clinical midwives claim that it takes time to feel confident and that there is a need to develop professionalism.

  • 2.
    Bäck, Lena
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Hildingsson, Ingegerd
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences. Uppsala Universitet.
    Sjöqvist, Carina
    Östersunds sjukhus.
    Karlström, Annika
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Developing competence and confidence in midwifery: focus groups with Swedish midwives2017In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799, Vol. 30, no 1, p. E32-E38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Midwives have a significant impact on the clinical outcome and the birthing experience of women. However, there has been a lack of research focusing specifically on clinical midwives’ learning and development of professional competence.

    Aim

    The objective of the study was to describe how midwives reflect on learning and the development of professional competence and confidence.

    Methods

    A qualitative study based on focus groups with midwives employed in maternity services.

    Findings

    Four categories describe the results: (1) Feelings of professional safety evolve over time; (2) Personal qualities affect professional development; (3) Methods for expanding knowledge and competence; and (4) Competence as developing and demanding. The meaning of competence is to feel safe and secure in their professional role. There was a link between the amount of hands-on intrapartum experience and increasing confidence that is, assisting many births made midwives feel confident. Internal rotation was disliked because the midwives felt they had less time to deepen their knowledge and develop competence in a particular field. The midwives felt they were not seen as individuals, and this system made them feel split between different assignments.

    Discussion

    External factors that contribute to the development of knowledge and competence include the ability to practise hands-on skills in an organisation that is supportive and non-threatening. Internal factors include confidence, self-efficacy, and a curiosity for learning.

    Conclusions

    Midwives working within an organisation should be supported to develop their professional role in order to become knowledgeable, competent and confident.

  • 3.
    Bäck, Lena
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Sharma, Bharati
    Indian Institute of Public Health Gandhinagar, Gujarat, India.
    Karlström, Annika
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Tunon, Katarina
    Umeå Universitet; Östersunds Sjukhus.
    Hildingsson, Ingegerd
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences. Uppsala Universitet.
    Professional confidence among Swedish final year midwifery students: A cross-sectional study2017In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 14, no December 2017, p. 69-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    Previous international studies have shown that midwifery students do not feel confident in many areas where they are supposed to practice independently.

    The knowledge about Swedish midwifery students’ confidence is fairly under investigated. The purpose of the present study was to explore final years’ midwifery students’ professional confidence in basic midwifery skills according to ICM competencies and associated factors.

    Methods

    A cross-sectional survey where all midwifery programs in Sweden were invited to participate. Data was collected by a questionnaire that measured midwifery students self-reported assessment of confidence against four selected domains of ICM competencies; antenatal, intrapartum, postpartum and new-born care.

    Result

    The main findings of this study showed that Swedish midwifery students were confident in managing normal pregnancy, labour and birth. Midwifery students at a school with a medical faculty were more confident in handling obstetric emergency situations. Some background variables were also associated with confidence.

    Conclusion

    This study highlighted some midwifery skills that needs further training and reflection. More training and developing confidence in complicated and emergency situations are needed. There seem to be a need of midwifery education reforms if we believe that high levels of confidence at the time of graduation is equal to competent and skilled midwives in the future.

  • 4.
    Panda, Sunita
    et al.
    Trinity College Dublin, School of Nursing & Midwifery, Dublin, Ireland.
    Daly, Deirdre
    Trinity College Dublin, School of Nursing & Midwifery, Dublin, Ireland.
    Begley, Cecily
    Trinity College Dublin, School of Nursing & Midwifery, Dublin, Ireland; Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg.
    Karlström, Annika
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Larsson, Birgitta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Bäck, Lena
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Hildingsson, Ingegerd
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Uppsala.
    Factors influencing decision-making for caesarean section in Sweden - a qualitative study2018In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Rising rates of caesarean section (CS) are a concern in many countries, yet Sweden has managed to maintain low CS rates. Exploring the multifactorial and complex reasons behind the rising trend in CS has become an important goal for health professionals. The aim of the study was to explore Swedish obstetricians' and midwives' perceptions of the factors influencing decision-making for CS in nulliparous women in Sweden. Methods: A qualitative design was chosen to gain in-depth understanding of the factors influencing the decision-making process for CS. Purposive sampling was used to select the participants. Four audio-recorded focus group interviews (FGIs), using an interview guide with open ended questions, were conducted with eleven midwives and five obstetricians from two selected Swedish maternity hospitals after obtaining written consent from each participant. Data were managed using NVivo (c) and thematically analysed. Ethical approval was granted by Trinity College Dublin. Results: The thematic analysis resulted in three main themes; 'Belief in normal birth - a cultural perspective'; 'Clarity and consistency - a system perspective' and 'Obstetrician makes the final decision, but ...', and each theme contained a number of subthemes. However, 'Belief in normal birth' emerged as the core central theme, overarching the other two themes. Conclusion: Findings suggest that believing that normal birth offers women and babies the best possible outcome contributes to having and maintaining a low CS rate. Both midwives and obstetricians agreed that having a shared belief (in normal birth), a common goal (of achieving normal birth) and providing mainly midwife-led care within a 'team approach' helped them achieve their goal and keep their CS rate low.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf