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  • 1. Andres, R. J
    et al.
    Marland, Gregg
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Fossil-fuel-derived carbon dioxide emissions for China at monthly resolution (abs)2005In: Proceedings. Annual Meeting of the American Geophysical Union, December, 2005, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2. Blasing, T. J.
    et al.
    Broniak, C. T.
    Marland, Gregg
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Increasing the temporal and spatial resolution of fossil-fuel carbon emissions estimates for the United States of America (abs.)2005In: Proceedings, Seventh International Carbon Dioxide Conference, Boulder, CO, USA, September 26-30, 2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3. Blasing, T.J.
    et al.
    Broniak, C
    Marland, Gregg
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    State-by-state carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel use in the United States 1960-20002005In: Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, ISSN 1381-2386, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 659-674Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Blasing, T.J
    et al.
    Brontiak, C.T
    Marland, Greg
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    The annual cycle of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions in the United States2005In: Tellus. Series B, Chemical and physical meteorology, ISSN 0280-6509, E-ISSN 1600-0889, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 107-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Time-series of estimated monthly carbon dioxide emissions from consumption of coal, petroleum and natural gas in the United States from 1981 to 2002 have been derived from energy consumption data. The data series for coal and natural gas each reveal a consistent seasonal pattern, with a winter peak for gas and two peaks (summer and winter) for coal. The annual cycle of total emissions has an amplitude of about 20 Tg-C, and is dominated by CO2 released from consumption of natural gas. Summation of the monthly estimates to obtain annual values reveals good agreement with other estimates of CO2 emissions. The varying proportions of CO2 emitted from each fuel type over the course of a year lead to an annual cycle in the carbon isotope ratio (δ13C), with a range of about 2 ‰. These monthly carbon emissions estimates should be helpful in understanding the carbon cycle by providing (1) monthly/seasonal input for carbon cycle models, (2) estimates of the annual cycle of the 13C isotope ratio in fossil-fuel CO2 emissions and (3) data at fine enough time intervals to investigate effects of seasonal climate variations and changes in seasonally dependent use patterns of certain appliances (e.g. air conditioners) on fossil-fuel carbon emissions.

  • 5. Canadel, Josep G.
    et al.
    Le Quere, Corrine
    Raupach, Michael R
    Field, Christopher B
    Buitenhuis, Erik T
    Ciais, Philippe
    Conway, Thomas J
    Gillett, Nathan P
    Houghton, R. A.
    Marland, Gregg
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Contributions to accelerating atmospheric CO2 growth from economic activity, carbon intensity, and efficiency of natural sinks2007In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 104, no 47, p. 18866-18870Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The growth rate of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), the largest human contributor to human-induced climate change, is increasing rapidly. Three processes contribute to this rapid increase. Two of these processes concern emissions. Recent growth of the world economy combined with an increase in its carbon intensity have led to rapid growth in fossil fuel CO2 emissions since 2000: comparing the 1990s with 2000–2006, the emissions growth rate increased from 1.3% to 3.3% y −1. The third process is indicated by increasing evidence (P = 0.89) for a long-term (50-year) increase in the airborne fraction (AF) of CO2 emissions, implying a decline in the efficiency of CO2 sinks on land and oceans in absorbing anthropogenic emissions. Since 2000, the contributions of these three factors to the increase in the atmospheric CO2 growth rate have been ≈65 ± 16% from increasing global economic activity, 17 ± 6% from the increasing carbon intensity of the global economy, and 18 ± 15% from the increase in AF. An increasing AF is consistent with results of climate–carbon cycle models, but the magnitude of the observed signal appears larger than that estimated by models. All of these changes characterize a carbon cycle that is generating stronger-than-expected and sooner-than-expected climate forcing.

  • 6.
    Dornburg, Veronika
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Marland, Gregg
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Temporary storage of carbon in the biosphere does have value for climate change mitigation:: a response to the paper by Miko Kirschbaum2008In: Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, ISSN 1381-2386, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 211-217Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7. Gomez, D R
    et al.
    Wattersson, J
    Americano, BB
    Ha, C
    Marland, Gregg
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Matsika, E
    Namayanga, L
    Osman, B
    Saka, J
    Treanton, K
    Stationary Combustion2006In: Energy, 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventories, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Geneva, Geneva , 2006Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    chapter 2, Energy, 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventories, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Geneva

  • 8. Gregg, Jay S.
    et al.
    Andres, Robert J.
    Marland, Gregg
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    China: World leader in CO2 emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement production2007In: Geophysical research letters, ISSN 0094-8276, Vol. 35, no 8, p. L08806-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Gustavsson, Leif
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Holmberg, Jonas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Dornburg, Veronica
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Sathre, Roger
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Eggers, Thies
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Mahapatra, Krushna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Marland, Gregg
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Using biomass for climate change mitigation and oil use reduction2007In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 35, no 11, p. 5671-5691Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we examine how an increased use of biomass could efficiently meet Swedish energy policy goals of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and oil use. In particular, we examine the trade-offs inherent when biomass use is intended to pursue multiple objectives. We set up four scenarios in which up to 400 PJ/year of additional biomass is prioritised to reduce CO2 emissions, reduce oil use, simultaneously reduce both CO2 emission and oil use, or to produce ethanol to replace gasoline. Technologies analysed for using the biomass include the production of electricity, heat, and transport fuels, and also as construction materials and other products. We find that optimising biomass use for a single objective (either CO2 emission reduction or oil use reduction) results in high fulfilment of that single objective (17.4 Tg C/year and 350 PJ oil/year, respectively), at a monetary cost of 130–330 million €/year, but with low fulfilment of the other objective. A careful selection of biomass uses for combined benefits results in reductions of 12.6 Tg C/year and 230 PJ oil/year (72% and 67%, respectively, of the reductions achieved in the scenarios with single objectives), with a monetary benefit of 45 million €/year. Prioritising for ethanol production gives the lowest CO2 emissions reduction, intermediate oil use reduction, and the highest monetary cost.

  • 10. King, AW
    et al.
    Dilling, L
    Zimmerman, GP
    Fairman, DM
    Houghton, RA
    Marland, Gregg
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Rose, AZ
    Wilbanks, TJ
    What is the carbon cycle and why care2007In: The First State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR), The North AMerican Carbon Budget and Implications for the Global Carbon Cycle..., Asheville, NC, USA: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration , 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11. Kunda, M.
    et al.
    Bird, D.N.
    Canella, L.
    Marland, Gregg
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Schlamadinger, B.
    Carbon management, earth surface albedo, and biomass fuels2006In: Proceedings of the 14th European Biomass Conference: Biomass for Energy, Industry, and Climate Protection, 17-21 May, 2005, Paris, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Losey, L. M.
    et al.
    University of North Dakota, United States.
    Andres, R. J.
    University of North Dakota, United States.
    Marland, Gregg
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Monthly estimates of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel consumption in Brazil during the late 1990s and early 2000s2006In: Area (London 1969), ISSN 0004-0894, E-ISSN 1475-4762, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 445-452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Detailed understanding of global carbon cycling requires estimates of CO2 emissions on temporal and spatial scales finer than annual and country. This is the first attempt to derive such estimates for a large, developing, Southern Hemisphere country. Though data on energy use are not complete in terms of time and geography, there are enough data available on the sale or consumption of fuels in Brazil to reasonably approximate the temporal and spatial patterns of fuel use and CO2 emissions. Given the available data, a strong annual cycle in emissions from Brazil is not apparent. CO2 emissions are unevenly distributed within Brazil as the population density and level of development both vary widely.

  • 13.
    Marland, Gregg
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Andres, R.J.
    Blasing, T.J.
    Boden, T.A.
    Broniak, C.T.
    Gregg, J.S.
    Losey, L.M.
    Treanton, K.
    Energy, industry, and waste management activities: an introduction to CO2 emissions from fossil fuels. Part II Overview2006In: The First State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR), The North American Carbon Budget: A report by the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and the Subcommittee on Global Change Research, Asheville, N.C. USA: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration , 2006Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Marland, Gregg
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Boden, T.A.
    Andres, R.J.
    Global, regional, and national fossil fuel CO2 emissions (1751-2004) (an update)2007Report (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Marland, Gregg
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Denning, A.S.
    Science implementation strategy for the North American Carbon Program: A report prepared for the U.S. Carbon Cycle Scientific Steering Group and the Interagency Working Group2005Report (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Marland, Gregg
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Obersteiner, Michael
    Large-scale biomass for energy, with considerations and cautions: an editorial comment2008In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, Vol. 87, p. 335-342Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Marland, Gregg
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Obersteiner, Michael
    Schlamadinger, Bernhard
    The carbon benefits of fuels and forests2007In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, Vol. 318, no 5853, p. 1066-1066Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18. Matthews, R.W
    et al.
    Robertson, G
    Marland, Gregg
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Marland, E
    Carbon in wood products and product substitution2007In: Forestry and Climate Change, Cambridge, Mass.: CABI Publishing, 2007, p. 91-104Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19. Osman-Elasha, B.
    et al.
    Pipatti, R.
    Agyemang-Bonsu, W.K.
    Al-Ibrahim, A.M.
    Lopez, Carlos
    Marland, Gregg
    Shenchu, H.
    Tailakov, O.
    Implications of carbon dioxide capture and storage for greenhouse gas inventories and accounting2005In: Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage: Special Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change IPCC, Cambridge University Press, 2005Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20. Pacala, S
    et al.
    Birdsey, RA
    Bridgham, SD
    Conant, RJ
    Davis, K
    Hales, B
    Houghton, RA
    Jenkins, JC
    Johnston, M
    Marland, Gregg
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Paustian, K
    The North American carbon budget past and present2007In: The First State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR), The North American Carbon Budget and Implications for the Global Carbon Cycle, 2007Chapter in book (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 21. Raupach, Michael R
    et al.
    Marland, Gregg
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Ciais, Philippe
    Le Quéré, Corinne
    Canadell, Joseph G
    Klepper, Gernot
    Field, Christopher B
    Global and regional drivers of accelerating CO2 emissions2007In: National Academy of Sciences. Proceedings, ISSN 0027-8424, Vol. 104, no 24, p. 10288-10293Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22. Sabesan, A.
    et al.
    West, T.O.
    Roddy, A.B.
    Marland, Gregg
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Bhaduri, B.L.
    Lateral flow of carbon from U.S. agricultural lands: carbon uptake, consumption, and respiration (abs.)2005In: Proceedings Annual Meeting of the American Geophysical Union, December, 2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23. Schlamadinger, B
    et al.
    Marland, Gregg
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    A synopsis of land-use, land-use change and forestry (LULUCF) under the Kyoto Protocol and Marrakech Accords2007In: Environmental science & policy, ISSN 1462-9011, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 271-282Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24. Smith, P
    et al.
    Nabuurs, G-J
    Janssens, I A
    Reis, S
    Marland, Gregg
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Sectoral approaches to improve regional carbon budgets2008In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 88, no 3-4, p. 209-249Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Humans utilise about 40% of the earth's net primary production (NPP) but the products of this NPP are often managed by different sectors, with timber and forest products managed by the forestry sector and food and fibre products from croplands and grasslands managed by the agricultural sector. Other significant anthropogenic impacts on the global carbon cycle include human utilization of fossil fuels and impacts on less intensively managed systems such as peatlands, wetlands and permafrost. A great deal of knowledge, expertise and data is available within each sector. We describe the contribution of sectoral carbon budgets to our understanding of the global carbon cycle. Whilst many sectors exhibit similarities for carbon budgeting, some key differences arise due to differences in goods and services provided, ecology, management practices used, land-management personnel responsible, policies affecting land management, data types and availability, and the drivers of change. We review the methods and data sources available for assessing sectoral carbon budgets, and describe some of key data limitations and uncertainties for each sector in different regions of the world. We identify the main gaps in our knowledge/data, show that coverage is better for the developed world for most sectors, and suggest how sectoral carbon budgets could be improved in the future. Research priorities include the development of shared protocols through site networks, a move to full carbon accounting within sectors, and the assessment of full greenhouse gas budgets.

  • 25. Spreng, D. S.
    et al.
    Marland, Gregg
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Weinberg, A. M.
    CO2 capture and storage: another Faustian Bargain2007In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 35, p. 850-854Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26. Tonn, B.
    et al.
    Marland, Gregg
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Carbon sequestration in wood products: a method for attribution to multiple parties2007In: Environmental Science & Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, Vol. 10, p. 162-168Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27. West, T.O.
    et al.
    Marland, Gregg
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    De La Torre Ugarte, D.
    Larson, J.
    Hellwinkle, C.
    Wilson, B.
    Developing bottom-up estimates of net carbon flux using survey data and remote sensing: A case study of the U.S. mid-continent region (abs.)2005In: Proceedings Annual Meeting of the American Geophysical Union, December, 2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
1 - 27 of 27
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