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  • 1.
    Arnesson, Leif
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Salman, Khalik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Coach Succession and Team Performance: The Impact of Ability and Timing -- Swedish Ice Hockey Data2009In: Journal of Quantitative Analysis in Sports, ISSN 1559-0410, Vol. 5, no 1, p. Article 2-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to identify a function for the team performance for professional ice hockey teams in Sweden. In order to understand how team performance relates to key variables such as coaching ability and coaching experience and succession, the OLS (Ordinary Least Squares) and the more robust quantile regression techniques are used to estimate team performance for the ice hockey teams. Quarterly data for the period 1975-2006 is used for this purpose. The results have shown that coaching ability has a rather significant positive effect on team performance, and that managerial succession during the season is found to have a rather significant negative effect on team performance. The results also indicate a strong correlation between coaching ability and team performance. Moreover, the quantile regression approach provided a better understanding regarding the dynamics of the factors that affect performance and provided more interesting results than the OLS normally does.

  • 2.
    Salman, Khalik
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Arnesson, Leif
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Shukur, Ghazi
    Coach succession and team performance; the impact of ability and timing: Swedish ice hockey data2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to identify a function for the team performance for professional ice hockey teams in Sweden. In order to understand how team performance relates to key variables such as coaching ability and coaching experience and succession, the OLS (Ordinary Least Squares) and the more robust quantile regression techniques were used to estimate the team performance for the ice hockey teams. Quarterly data for the period 1975-2006 is used for this purpose. The results have shown that coaching ability has a rather significant positive effect on team performance, and they have also shown that managerial succession during the season is found to have a rather significant negative effect on team performance. We also found a strong correlation between coaching ability and team performance. Moreover, the quantile regression approach provided a better understanding regarding the dynamics of the factors that affect performance and provided more interesting results than the OLS normally does.

  • 3.
    Salman, Khalik
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Arnesson, Leif
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Sörensson, Anna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Estimating the Swedish and Norwegian international tourism demandusing (ISUR) technique2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper estimates the demand for tourism to Sweden and Norway for five countries:

    Denmark, the United Kingdom, Switzerland, Japan, and the United States. For each visiting

    country, and for Sweden and Norway, we specify separate equations by including relative

    information. We then estimate these equations using Zellner’s Iterative Seemingly Unrelated

    Regressions (ISUR). The benefit of this model is that the ISUR estimators utilize the

    information present in the error correlation of the cross regressions (or equations) and hence are

    more efficient than single equation estimation methods such as ordinary least squares. Monthly

    time series data from 1993:01 to 2006:12 are used. The results show that the consumer price

    index, some lagged dependent variables, and several monthly dummies (representing seasonal

    effects) have a significant impact on the number of visitors to the SW6 region in Sweden and

    Tröndelag in Norway. We also find that, in at least some cases, relative prices and exchange

    rates have a significant effect on international tourism demand.

  • 4.
    Salman, Khalik
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Arnesson, Leif
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Sörensson, Anna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Shukur, G
    Department of Economics and Statistics, Jönköping University, Centre of Labour Market Policy Research (CAFO), Linnaeus University, Växjö University, Sweden.
    Estimating international tourism demand for selected regions in Sweden and Norway with iterative seemingly unrelated regressions (ISUR)2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 395-410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper estimates the demand for tourism to Sweden and Norway from five countries: Denmark, the United Kingdom, Switzerland, Japan, and the United States. For each visiting country, and for selected regions in Sweden and Norway, we specify separate equations by including relative information. We then estimate these equations using Zellner's Iterative Seemingly Unrelated Regressions (ISUR). The benefit of this model is that the ISUR estimators utilize the information present in the error correlation of the cross regressions (or equations) and hence are more efficient than single equation estimation methods such as ordinary least squares. Monthly time series data from January 1993 to December 2006 are used. The results show that the consumer price index, some lagged dependent variables, and several monthly dummies (representing seasonal effects) have a significant impact on the number of visitors to the SW6 region in Sweden and Tröndelag in Norway. We also find that, in at least some cases, relative prices and exchange rates have a significant effect on international tourism demand.

  • 5.
    Yazdanfar, Darush
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Business, Economics and Law.
    Salman, A. Khalik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Business, Economics and Law.
    Arnesson, Leif
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Business, Economics and Law.
    Life Cycle of profitability among Swedish micro firms2013In: World Review of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, ISSN 1746-0573, E-ISSN 1746-0581, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 340-351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the profitability life cycle among Swedish micro firms. The study sample contains 22,710 micro firms across six industries for which complete financial information is available for the year (2007, giving a total of 68,130 observations. The results of the empirical study indicate that the firm profitability changes systematically over its life cycle stages. The profitability is high in the first life cycle stage, and as firms age and develop, it decreases. The change of firm profitability in different industries over their life cycles follows the general pattern of the total sample. Empirical tests provide support for two additional predictions of the life cycle model: specifically, that firm size influences profitability, and that the industry affiliation has a more pronounced effect on firms’ profitability than the variables size and life cycle stage. The results from the statistical tests support the applicability of the life cycle model to explain the profitability development pattern.

  • 6.
    Yazdanfar, Darush
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Salman, Khalik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Arnesson, Leif
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Assessing determinants on job creation at the firm level Swedish Micro Firm Data2012In: International Journal of Economics and Finance, ISSN 1916-9728, E-ISSN 1916-971X, Vol. 4, no 12, p. 105-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the profitability life cycle among Swedish micro firms. The study sample contains 22,710 micro firms across six industries for which complete financial information is available for the year 2007, giving a total of 68,130 observations. The results of the empirical study indicate that the firm profitability changes systematically over its life cycle stages. The profitability is high in the first life cycle stage, and as firms age and develop, it decreases. The change of firm profitability in different industries over their life cycles follows the general pattern of the total sample. Empirical tests provide support for two additional predictions of the life cycle model: specifically, that firm size influences profitability, and that the industry affiliation has a more pronounced effect on firms’ profitability than the variables size and life cycle stage. The results from the statistical tests support the applicability of the life cycle model to explain the profitability development pattern.

1 - 6 of 6
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