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  • 1.
    Ahlin, Karin
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Computer and System science.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Löfstedt, Ulrica
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Computer and System science.
    Mårtensson, Anna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Åslund, Anna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Öberg, Lena-Maria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Computer and System science.
    Projekt Kundanpassad teknikinformation – KATI: Slutrapport – med fokus på förslag på arbetssätt och metoder2014Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Löfstedt, Ulrica
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Computer and System science.
    Mårtensson, Anna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Öberg, Lena-Maria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Computer and System science.
    Projekt Kundanpassad teknikinformation – KATI: Kvalitetsarbete inom teknikinformation – Goda exempel och utvecklingsbehov2014Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Mårtensson, Anna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Slutrapport ”Resultatstyrning för medborgarnytta”: Ett samverkansprojekt mellan Sundsvalls kommun och Kvalitetsteknik vid Mittuniversitetet2019Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Mårtensson, Anna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Measuring the importance and practices of Lean values2014In: The TQM Journal, ISSN 1754-2731, E-ISSN 1754-274X, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 463-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to present the result from a study carried out at an organization, which has recently started applying Lean, to examine changes in the importance and presence of Lean values within the organization in relation to when different parts of the organization started to apply Lean.

    Design/methodology/approach – A questionnaire was used at three different groups at a dental care provider. ANOVA was used to detect any differences in regards to the importance and practice of five Lean values in relation to time since the clinics started to apply Lean.

    Findings – The study showed no difference between the three groups in relation to the stated importance of the values, something that could indicate that there is a commonly shared value base in the organization. The only difference that was statistically significant was with regard to the presence of the values ‘Continuous improvement’ and ‘Supportive leadership’ between Groups 1 (pilot, 18 month since starting to apply Lean) and 3 (not yet started to apply Lean).

    Research limitation/implications – The research was conducted as one single study in one organization and further research should be done in other organizations and types of businesses.

    Practical implications – The questionnaire can be used in organizations to put focus on cultural change when applying Lean both when it comes to practice as well as importance.

    Originality/value – Traditional measures mainly focus on hard measurements when measuring the progress in applying quality initiatives such as Lean. This questionnaire can complement these traditional measurements and create a greater focus on the cultural changes in the organization.

  • 5.
    Mårtensson, Anna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Insights in Lean values: Exploring links to sustainable development2017Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Quality Management initiative Lean is a popular method used by organisations to engage in organisational development. The Lean philosophy is grounded in numerous values. The organisations must implement and apply these values to achieve the desired results. Lean poses a dilemma in that many organisations fail to implement it because they fail to change, and they fail to maintain their new organisational culture. Lean's values are linked to sustainable development principles, and organisations that have implemented Lean have achieved results consistent with a more sustainable society. Previous studies have shown that more research is needed in areas in which business leaders require more support and knowledge so that they can combine these areas to strive for sustainable development.

     

    The purpose of this thesis is to contribute a deeper understanding of the application of Lean values when implementing Lean, and the potential to interlink to sustainability theory. To achieve this purpose, studies have been conducted in three organisations. Data were collected through a survey, interviews, and a systematic literature review was conducted that was also used to analyse findings from the empirical data. The results have been presented in four different papers.

     

    The findings provide deeper knowledge of Lean values during Lean implementation. They also provide a picture of the complexity in the inter-linkages between the values embodied in Lean and sustainable development principles. This thesis shows that the length of time that Lean has been implemented affects the kind and extent to which values are visible in an organisation: more values are visible in organisations that have worked the longest following Lean implementation. It has also been found that the values articulated in an organisation’s vision and strategy for implementing Lean have a greater perceived presence among employees than other Lean values. As well, differences were found in the presence of Lean values between the operational level and the strategic level of an organisation. However, findings indicated that the Lean values that were visible were more often fragmented rather than a pure value as presented in the theory. The findings also showed that interlinkages between some of sustainability principles and Lean values are more visible in one of the two organisational levels. For example, ´Waste reduction´ was only visible at the operational level.

     

    Implementing and applying Lean takes time and requires a change in the organisational culture. This thesis concluded that the Lean values of the ‘System view’ and ‘Long-term thinking’ have low presence and are not a part of the values considered most important to employees when implementing Lean. For organisations at the beginning of their implementation, this knowledge may be good to consider as failures with implementation are often due to the fact that change in organisational culture does not happen as intended. This finding indicates that there are gaps in the knowledge among employees about the important links between Lean and sustainable development. It is difficult to draw boundaries between the values when they should be recognized as a system.

  • 6.
    Mårtensson, Anna
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Managers basic assumptions when applying Lean2013In: 16th QMOD-ICQSS Proceedings: Quality Management and Organizational Development Conference [being] International Conference Quality and Service Sciences / [ed] Su Mi Dahlgaard-Park, Jens J. Dahlgaard, Boštjan Gomišček, 2013, p. 1206-1215Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to present the result from a case study were managers where interviewed in order to find out their basic assumptions (i.e. purpose and underlying values) for applying Lean. The purpose is also to investigate if these basic assumptions are in line with what the literature describes as important for succeeding when applying Lean.

     

    Methodology/approach – Interviews based on an interview guide with open questions were carried out with managers in an organization.

    Findings – The study showed that the reason given for applying Lean are different between a manager that has started to apply Lean and a manager that has not yet started to apply Lean in their organization and that it is a difference between their basic assumptions.

     

    Originality/Value – The paper indicates the importance of knowing the managers’ values when applying Lean and the importance to educate managers’ to get a deeper understanding of Lean.

    Paper type Case study

  • 7.
    Mårtensson, Anna
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Measuring Sustainability through values: Developing and Testing of Statements in a Questionnaire2018In: 21st QMOD-ICQSS Conference / [ed] Su Mi Dahlgaard-Park, 2018, p. 1065-1072Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To describe the development and testing of statements aiming at measuring sustainable development and a way ofextending an existing questionnaire intended to measure factors representing values and principles identified in qualitydevelopment theory.Methodology: A questionnaire is further developed from an earlier version. The new version consists of 45 different statements representing 15 different factors related to quality development, lean and sustainable development. The questionnaire was tested in one organisation, and the results were statistically analysed using SPSS.Findings: The results indicate that the developed questionnaire needs further development and more tests since the composition of the factors and statements did not reach an acceptable value for internal consistency reliability in the selectedorganisation. The need for development of measurements of organisational culture remains, including system view and longtermthinking. Sustainable development is complex with several different parts, which creates challenges when combined with quality development. Practical implications: Results from the measurement tools used can be inputs for organisational business strategies and goals and ultimately can affect organisational results. To put more focus on sustainability, the questionnaire can be that input for organisations.

  • 8.
    Mårtensson, Anna
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Co-creation - making it happen2019In: 22nd QMOD conference: ON QUALITY AND SERVICE SCIENCES ICQSS 2019, 13-15 OCTOBER / [ed] Su Mi Dahlgaard-Park & Jens J. Dahlgaard, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organisations continuously meet different challenges, often ones that are both difficult and complex. Identified challenges include, for instance, costumers becoming more changeable and volatile as well as organisations needing to become more sustainable in several dimensions and to having a structured and systematic method for working with quality. Municipalities are not excluded from these challenges and need to face the challenge of demands from citizens as well as be efficient and effective at the same time.New ways of working and doing things need to be developed and adapted to meet and fulfil organisational challenges. Co-creation, which is a collaborative process to identify and shape the desired goals, can be a method that allows organisations to establish new ways of working and creating supportive methods. In addition, a collaborative process facilitates the adoption of new ways of working since it is easier to do that through actions rather than thinking oneself into a new way of acting.

    Purpose: The purpose is to describe the process of co-creating a dialogue model that aim to increase citizen value in a municipality organisation. The purpose is also to present the results from the development process and evaluate the chosen model.

    Methodology/Approach: A dialogue model was developed through a co-creation process conducted through a series of workshops, discussions and interactive tasks. The whole process was carried out in three steps. In the first step, success factors for a constructive dialogue emanating from citizen value were identified. In the second step, several dialogue models were developed, tested and evaluated, and one model was chosen. In the third step, the chosen model was evaluated.

    Findings: Evaluating the real-life use of the model supports the statement that the process has delivered a model that enables the requested prerequisites for constructive dialogues such as, for example, the opportunity for preparation, structured and transparent documentation and enabling a holistic view in the dialogue model. Co-creation that has involved co-workers have contributed to develop the dialogue model to be adapted to their own context.

    Value of the paper: Using a co-creative process when developing and realising a dialogue model enhances the possibilities for an organisational adaption to its own context.

    Type of paper: Case study

  • 9.
    Mårtensson, Anna
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Öberg, Lena-Maria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Computer and System science.
    Can Lean values contribute to Sustainable Development2014In: 17th Qmod-ICQSS: Part 2: INDEX and FULLPAPERS / [ed] Su Mi Dahlgaard-Park, Jens Jörn Dahlgaard, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The aim of this paper was to study interactions between Sustainable Development and Lean values by comparing two organizations, one with Technical Communication in-house and one with Technical Communication partly outsourced.

    Methodology/approach – A literature study with focus on Lean and Sustainable Development values was carried out. Interviews with companies that provide Technical Communication have been conducted to identify Lean categories. The identified categories have been compared to the findings in Lean and Sustainable Development values.

    Findings – The literature study and our results indicate that presence of Lean values support Sustainable Development, but it requires that organizations focus on the culture and values. The result indicates that if Technical Communication has a low status the company put low value on Sustainable Development. If Technical Communication is produced in-house customer involvement might be easier to achieve.

    Practical implications – The identification of Lean values can be a starting point for organizations to work with Sustainable Development as it helps the organizations to focus on significant areas.

    Paper type – Case study

  • 10.
    Mårtensson, Anna
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Snyder, Kristen
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Interlinking Lean and Sustainability: How ready are leaders?2019In: The TQM Journal, ISSN 1754-2731, E-ISSN 1754-274X, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 136-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore evidence of interlinkages between Lean and sustainability among organisational leaders in the early stages of Lean implementation.

    Design/methodology: A multiple-site case study was conducted to study the connections between Lean and sustainable development during the implementation stages of a Lean practice. In-depth interviews were conducted with managers about their knowledge and understanding of the interlinkages between Lean and sustainable development. The findings were then used as an analytic frame to determine whether these interlinkages were present in the organisation.

    Findings: Evidence of interlinkages between Lean and sustainable development was found; however, their presence was incomplete and inconsistent across clinics.

    Research implications: Insights from the research can help organisations plan for the implementation of Lean practice, particularly when a sub-goal is to achieve sustainable development.

    Originality/value: The study shows the importance of focusing on managers’ knowledge and understanding of the interlinkages between Lean and sustainable development when implementing Lean in order to utilise Leans full potential to achieve sustainability.

1 - 10 of 10
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