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  • 1. Andersson, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Omberg, Monica
    Svedlund, Marianne
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Triage in the emergency department: A qualitative study of the factors which nurses consider when making decisions2006In: Nursing in Critical Care, ISSN 1362-1017, E-ISSN 1478-5153, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 136-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Triage, as a concept, is relatively new in Sweden and means 'sorting'. The triage process was developed to grade patients who needed immediate care. Triage is currently important for the emergency treatment system, and nurses are expected to work with it professionally. The aim of this study is to describe how nurses implement triage when patients arrive at the emergency department of a county hospital, situated in a rural area of Sweden, as well as to highlight the factors considered when prioritizing, in connection with nurses' decision-making. The method used was observations of 19 nurses, with minimal disturbance in their triage work, followed by a short tape-recorded interview, during which the nurses were asked to reflect upon their decision of priorities. Qualitative content analysis of data has been used. The results were divided into two areas, internal factors and external factors. The internal factors reflect the nurse skills and personal capacity. The external factors reflect work environment, including high workload and practical arrangements, and should always be perceived and taken into consideration. Using these factors as a basis, the patients' clinical condition, clinical history, various examinations and tests form an assessment, which subsequently results in a prioritization.

  • 2.
    Björkman Randström, Kerstin
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Asplund, Kenneth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Svedlund, Marianne
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    "I have to be patient" - A longitudinal case study of an older man's rehabilitation experience after a hip replacement surgery2013In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 3, no 8, p. 160-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Aging can bring about an increased risk of disability. Following illness or injures, rehabilitation is essentialif the individual affected is to attain and maintain independence. Performing rehabilitation with a person-centeredapproach is vital for positive outcomes. Health providers are increasingly interested in developing rehabilitation servicesin outpatient settings for older people in their own homes. Aim: The aim of this study was to describe an older man’s rehabilitation experience after a hip replacement surgery.Design: A longitudinal qualitative descriptive single case study.Methods: Interviews were conducted on four occasions with the participant in his own home. The interviews wereconducted one month, seven months, one year, and five years after the patient was discharged from the hospital. The datawere analyzed using qualitative content analysis.Results: Three categories emerged: (i) having feelings of despair, (ii) being in charge, and (iii) having rehabilitative support. The results demonstrate the participant’s decreased ability to walk after a complicated hip surgery, and his physical and psychological struggle for well-being in everyday life. A strong motivation to return to as normal a life aspossible facilitated the rehabilitation. Also, a supportive family and accessible health care professionals were essential tothe positive outcome of the home rehabilitation.Conclusion: Rehabilitation can extend over a long period to maintain and improve mobility. Also, living with a disability causes feelings of despair. The home can be a source of energy but also a place of challenges during rehabilitation. To support older people in achieving their rehabilitation goals and engaging in meaningful activities, professionals should focus on personal factors, psychosocial support and on influential factors in the home environment and in society in general.

  • 3.
    Björkman Randström, Kerstin
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Asplund, Kenneth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Svedlund, Marianne
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Impact of environmental factors in home rehabilitation − a qualitative study from the perspective of older persons using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health to describe facilitators and barriers2012In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 34, no 9, p. 779-787Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore older people’s experience of environmental factors that impact on their activity and participation in home rehabilitation. Method: Older people aged between 68 and 93 years and receiving home rehabilitation were interviewed. A qualitative content analysis was performed on the interview text using the predetermined structure of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) environmental domain. The text was linked to the closest ICF category. Results: The results identified environmental facilitators and barriers that influenced activity and participation among older people receiving home rehabilitation. Approaches that provided a facilitative environment were access to assistive products and technologies, alterations to the physical environment, social support and relationships, and adjusted health and social care services. Conclusions: A qualitative study using ICF-listed environmental factors contributed a holistic view of facilitators and barriers in home rehabilitation for older people. Awareness of the importance of the impact of the social environment on activities and participation could improve home rehabilitation services for older people. The study represents an important step towards a holistic approach using the ICF, which aims to enable all health care professionals to describe, plan and evaluate rehabilitation services together with older people across the health and social care sectors.

  • 4.
    Björkman Randström, Kerstin
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Asplund, Kenneth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Svedlund, Marianne
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Paulson, Margareta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Activity and participation in home rehabilitation - older people's and family members' perspectives: Meeting abstract2010In: Journal of Clinical Nursing. Suppl 1, Wiley-Blackwell, 2010, Vol. 19, p. 85-85Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Björkman Randström, Kerstin
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Asplund, Kenneth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Svedlund, Marianne
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Paulson, Margareta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Activity and participation in home rehabilitation: Older people's and family members perspectives2013In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 211-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore the experiences of older people and their supporting family members in relation to home rehabilitation, with a focus on activity and participation. Methods: Qualitative interviews were carried out with 6 older people and 6 family members at 1 and 6 months after the older person’s discharge to their home. Qualitative content analysis of the data was carried out. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health provides a guiding framework for rehabilitation. Results: Informants’ experiences of home rehabilitation contributed to the formation of 6 categories: (i) living with a frail body; (ii) striving for well-being in daily life; (iii) being close at hand; (iv) feeling dependent in daily life; (v) struggling to carry on; and (vi) striving to be at home. Conclusion: Older people’s goals were to return to daily routines and to perform meaningful activities without feeling dependent on other people. Family members’ participation was crucial. Psychosocial support and autonomy were essential for facilitating activity and participation. Healthcare professionals should consider each individual’s unique experiences along with the significance of being at home.

  • 6.
    Björkman Randström, Kerstin
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Wengler, Yvonne
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Asplund, Kenneth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Svedlund, Marianne
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Working with 'hands-off' support: a qualitative study of multidisciplinary teams' experiences of home rehabilitation for older people2014In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 25-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    There is a move towards the provision of rehabilitation for older people in their homes. It is essential to ensure that rehabilitation services promote independence of older people.

    Aim

    The aim of the study was to explore multidisciplinary teams' experiences of home rehabilitation for older people.

    Methods

    Five focus groups were conducted with multidisciplinary teams based in a municipality in Sweden, covering seven different professions. In total, 28 participants volunteered to participate in these interviews. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed according to content analysis.

    Results

    Two main categories, as well as four subcategories, emerged. The first main category, having a rehabilitative approach in everyday life, consisted of the subcategories: ‘giving ‘hands-off’ support’ and ‘being in a home environment’. The second main category, working across professional boundaries, consisted of the subcategories: ‘coordinating resources’ and ‘learning from each other’.

    Conclusion

    Common goals, communication skills and role understanding contributed to facilitating the teams' performances of rehabilitation. A potential benefit of home rehabilitation, because the older person is in a familiar environment, is to work a rehabilitative approach into each individual's activity in their everyday life in order to meet their specific needs. At an organisational level, there is a need for developing services to further support older people's psychosocial needs during rehabilitation.

    Implications for practice

    Team performance towards an individual's rehabilitation should come from an emerged whole and not only from the performance of a specific professional approach depending on the traditional role of each profession. A rehabilitative approach is based on ‘hands-off’ support in order to incorporate an individual's everyday activities as a part of their rehabilitation.

  • 7.
    Björkman Randström, Yvonne
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Wengler, Yvonne
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Asplund, Kenneth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Svedlund, Marianne
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Multidisciplinary team's promoting a rehabilitative approach among older people in home care: Meeting abstract2010In: Journal of clinical nursing, Vol 19 Suppl 1, Wiley-Blackwell, 2010, p. 85-86Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Ek, Bosse
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Edström, P.
    Emergency Department, County Hospital, SE-831 83 Östersund, Sweden.
    Toutin, A.
    Ambulance Department, County Hospital, SE-831 83 Östersund, Sweden.
    Svedlund, Marianne
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Reliability of a Swedish pre-hospital dispatch system in prioritizing patients2013In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 143-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The need of emergency help often begins with a call to a dispatch center. The operator uses a medical index to prioritize dispatches. Since the resources of ambulances are limited, it is important that the priority grading decided by the operator at the dispatch center is as adequate as possible. In the county of Jamtland in Sweden, a system for triage named METTS-A (Medical Emergency Triage and Treatment System-A) has been in use since 2009, when the patient is coded according to priority level. The aim of this study was to analyse the sensitivity and specificity of the priority grading made by the dispatch center in comparison with the METTS-A priority assessed by the ambulance nurse. Statistics from a data-base in northern Sweden were analyzed. The material covered every ambulance that was dispatched, 6986 times during the period of data collecting. The results show a high sensitivity but low specificity in the dispatch system. The results also indicate that over prioritization exists since most of the patients with a high acute need of an ambulance are correctly identified, while many patients without that need are also given a high priority ambulance service. Therefore the conclusions were that both over- and under prioritizations were made. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 9.
    Ek, Bosse
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Svedlund, Marianne
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Registered nurses’ experiences of their decision-making at an Emergency Medical Dispatch Centre2015In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 24, no 7-8, p. 1122-1131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: To describe registered nurses experiences at an Emergency Medical Dispatch Centre.

    Background: It is important that ambulances are urgently directed to patients who are in need of immediate help and of quick transportation to a hospital. Because resources are limited, Emergency Medical Dispatch centres cannot send ambulances with high priority to all callers. The efficiency of the system is therefore dependent on triage. Nurses worldwide are involved in patient triage, both before the patients arrival to the hospital and in the subsequent emergency care. Ambulance dispatching is traditionally a duty for operators at Emergency Medical Dispatch centres, and in Sweden this duty has become increasingly performed by registered nurses.

    Design: A qualitative design was used for this study.

    Methods: Fifteen registered nurses with experience at Emergency Medical Dispatch centres were interviewed. The participants were asked to describe the content of their work and their experiences. They also described the most challenging and difficult situations according to the critical incidence technique. Content analysis was used.

    Results: Two themes emerged during the analysis: ‘Having a profession with opportunities and obstacles’ and ‘Meeting serious and difficult situations’, with eight sub-themes. The results showed that the decisions to dispatch ambulances were both challenging and difficult. Difficulties included conveying medical advice without seeing the patient, teaching cardio-pulmonary resuscitation via telephone and dealing with intoxicated and aggressive callers. Conflicts with colleagues and ambulance crews as well as fear of making wrong decisions were also mentioned.

    Conclusions: Work at Emergency Medical Dispatch centres is a demanding but stimulating duty for registered nurses.

    Relevance to clinical practice: Great benefits can be achieved using experienced triage nurses, including increased patient safety and better use of medical resources. Improved internal support systems at Emergency Medical Dispatch centres and striving for a blame-free culture are important factors to attract and retain employees.

  • 10.
    Eriksson, Monica
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Asplund, Kenneth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Hochwälder, Jacek
    Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet.
    Svedlund, Marianne
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Changes in hope and health-related quality of life in couples following acute myocardial infarction: A quantitative longitudinal study2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 295-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:  Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a life-changing event that affects both the patient and the family and can have an influence on hope as well as HRQoL during the recovery period.

    Aims:  To compare self-rated scores of hope and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) 1, 7, 13 and 25 months, after an AMI with regard to (i) differences across time, and (ii) differences between patients and their partners.

    Design:  Explorative and longitudinal study.

    Methods:  In this nonrandomized study, Short Form 36 Health Questionnaire (SF-36) and Herth Hope Index-Swedish (HHI-S) questionnaires were completed by thirteen post-AMI patients and their partners. Data were collected on four occasions.

    Results:  In general, hope as well as HRQoL scores increased over time. A 2 (groups) × 4 (times) anova for mixed design showed significant changes in mental as well as in physical health over time but no significant effect of group on mental or physical health. Calculation of the minimum detectable change (MDC-index) for HHI-S and SF-36 revealed that scores between data collection points were not stable.

    Conclusion:  Our results show that although hope and HRQoL scores increased, only a few of the changes were statistically significant. Neither HHI-S nor SF-36 seems to measure stable states. Changes in hope and HRQoL levels may be due to participants striving to adapt to the current situation.

    Relevance to clinical practice:  These results can be used in the training of nursing staff to enhance their understanding of the significance of a family-centred approach after an AMI.

  • 11.
    Eriksson, Monica
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Asplund, Kenneth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Svedlund, Marianne
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Couples´ thoughts about and expectations of their future life after the patient´s hospital discharge following acute myocardial infarction2010In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 19, no 23-24, p. 3485-3493Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To describe and interpret couples’ thoughts and expectations about their future life after the patient’s discharge following acute myocardial infarction [AMI].

    Background: An AMI is a challenge for both the patient and his/her partner, as it can disrupt family functioning and dynamics. Earlier research has generally focused on either the patient or the partner and few studies have explored the experiences of the couple.   

    Design: Qualitative descriptive and interpretative.

    Methods: 15 couples took part in individual interviews, 4-8 weeks after discharge. Data were analysed in two phases using qualitative content analysis.

    Results: The first phase of the analysis revealed two categories: ‘an active approach to the future’ and ‘a wait-and-see approach to the future’, both of which described the participants’ thoughts about the future. In the second phase, the couples’ stories were interpreted and grouped into four positions: ‘the life companions’, ‘the tightrope walkers’, ‘the pathfinders’ and ‘the observers’, which illustrated their visions of the future.

    Conclusions: Our results reveal differences in the couples’ thoughts about and expectations of their future life, most of them managed the situation by having a positive attitude to life and their future. The couples discovered their resources and compensated for or balanced each other in the early recovery period.

    Relevance to clinical practice: The results indicate the importance of giving both partners the opportunity to express their views of the situation, as this increases nurses’ understanding of the impact of the illness on their life and relationship. However, the results also highlight the significance of seeing the couple and showing them consideration both as individuals and as a unit.

  • 12.
    Eriksson, Monica
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Asplund, Kenneth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Svedlund, Marianne
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Couples´experiences of their relationship over a two year period following an acute myocardial infarction: A longitudinal qualitative studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Eriksson, Monica
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Asplund, Kenneth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Svedlund, Marianne
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Patients´and their partners´experiences of returning home after hospital discharge following acute myocardial infarction2009In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 267-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Returning home from hospital after an acute myocardial infarction [AMI] can be a period of vulnerability both for the patient and his/her partner. This study focuses on the time immediately after discharge.

    Aims: The aim of this study was to describe the patient’s and his/her partner’s experiences after hospital discharge following AMI.

    Methods: 15 couples took part in individual interviews, 4- 8 weeks after discharge. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results: The results are presented by means of three themes, ´ at home in one’s own home`, ´ at home within oneself ` and ´having normality in sight`, comprising ten categories that describe the experiences of both the patient and his/her partner.

    Conclusions: The patients as well as partners described the period after discharge from hospital comprising ambitions of feeling safety in their home, an inner sense of security and seeking normalisation.The results of this study could be useful for nurses when planning for patient discharge. During hospitalization nurses can prepare both the patient and their partner for what to expect when the patient returns home.

  • 14.
    Eriksson, Monica
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Svedlund, Marianne
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Elderly Spouses Experiences In Connection With Their Partners’ Death: A Literature Review2007In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 43-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous generations’ inherent and natural knowledge of encouraging routines and rituals for mourning is no longer an obvious part of our society of today. The aim with this literature review was to present elderly spouses experience in connection with their partners’ death. The result has been achieved be qualitative content analysis of eleven scientific articles. The categories and sub- categories that appeared have been used to describe the altered life situation the elderly faced. Death involves a series of experiences for the surviving relatives and in order to cope with the situation there is a need to adapt to the different requirements. The spouses undergo varying stages of adjustment during the mourning. The conclusions from this literature review were that elderly surviving experiences altered over time but that loneliness remains during a very long space of time. Lack of social support and close connections compose risk factors, which have negative influences on the mental health. Over the years, the overall majority of the surviving adjusts well to the loss of their partner

  • 15.
    Eriksson, Monica
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Svedlund, Marianne
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    The intruder': spouses' narratives about life with a chronically ill partner2006In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 324-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of this study was to illuminate the meaning of middle-aged spouse's experiences of living with a chronically ill partner. A purposive sample of four female spouses was selected for interviews using a narrative approach. BACKGROUND: When someone is diagnosed with a chronic illness, it is easy to understand that a considerable number of devastating consequences follow, both for the afflicted as well as for the family. Families often feel neglected and that their problems and needs are underestimated, if they do not personally draw attention to this fact. METHODS: A phenomenological hermeneutic method, inspired by the philosophy of Ricoeur, was used when interpreting the interview text. RESULTS: The experiences of spouses living with a chronically ill partner often brought a feeling of detachment from their partner's lives. The women experienced changes in their relationships because of their partners' disabilities; they had emotions of loneliness, despite living together as a couple. Through their actions, the women sought reassurance and support in order to maintain a meaningful partnership with their spouses and this is expressed in three themes: feelings of limitation, the struggle of everyday life and a striving for normalization. CONCLUSIONS: Middle-aged women living with a chronically sick partner are still of an active disposition and regard themselves as still being in mid-life. They wish to be loved as a wife and not as a care provider. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The findings from this study can help increase the knowledge and understanding of the problems and concerns encountered by middle-aged spouses living with chronically ill partners and can be useful in the education and supervision of nurses and in relationship with relatives.

  • 16.
    Eriksson, Ulrika
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Svedlund, Marianne
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Struggling for confirmation - patients' experiences of dissatisfaction with hospital care2007In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 438-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of the study was to illuminate patients' experiences of dissatisfaction with hospital care. BACKGROUND: During the last decade, interest in measuring patient satisfaction has become an important indicator of the quality of care. Researchers have, however, criticized the concept theoretically and methodologically. Subsequently, researchers have increasingly argued that the focus of attention should shift to explore patient dissatisfaction. DESIGN: A qualitative approach. METHODS: Narrative interviews were conducted with six people who had experienced dissatisfaction during a hospital care episode. The interview text was analysed using qualitative content analysis. RESULTS: The results show the patients' struggle for confirmation, the feeling of distrust in health care and what they have been forced to sacrifice because of lack of treatment. A feeling of being a troublesome patient is also apparent. At the same time a positive encounter is described, as well as situations of confirmation from caregivers. The results also show hope and a will to get on with life. CONCLUSIONS: Dissatisfaction relating to aspects of encounter is a common problem in health care and conceivable causes and possible solutions are discussed from different perspectives. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL: PRACTICE: Caregivers as well as patients are in need of confirmation. If management were to take notice of and confirm caregivers this could consequently help them to gain the strength and energy necessary to provide care permeated with confirmation. A veritable, trustworthy care can be established through personal presence. To take notice of, confirm and listen to patients, creates opportunities for providing them with a positive experience of human encounter, which in the long run is rewarding from all perspectives.

  • 17.
    Jakobsson, Björn
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Bergroth, Alf
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Ekholm, Jan
    Schüldt Ekholm, Kristina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Svedlund, Marianne
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Multi-professional vocational rehabilitation group meetings with female clients - a qualitative study.2008In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 413-421Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many women require vocational rehabilitation before they can return to work. The objective with the present study was to describe female clients' situation during the rehabilitation process, as it became apparent during the rehabilitation meetings with the various actors involved. The clients' diagnoses varied, but the majority was affected with musculoskeletal disorders. The meetings were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim, after which they were analysed by qualitative content analysis. The following themes emerged: Adaptation to the rehabilitation group; client's health status; the workplace's significance for rehabilitation; and the client's decision-point. Conflict between health and work was immensely important for rehabilitation. Differences in attitude were apparent during the rehabilitation meetings, as some clients were passive and exercised less influence on the planning, than the other more active clients did.

  • 18.
    Junehag, Lena
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Asplund, Kenneth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Svedlund, Marianne
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    A qualitative study: Perceptions of the psychosocial consequences and access to support after an acute myocardial infarction2014In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 22-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe individuals' perceptions of the psychosocial consequences of an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and of their access to support one year after the event. Methods: The study included 20 participants (14 men and six women) who lived in rural areas and had experienced their first AMI. Eleven were offered contact with a mentor. The participants were interviewed one year after their AMI. Results: The findings are presented in three themes: having a different life, having to manage the situation and having access to support, with 11 subthemes. During their recovery, the participants experienced psychosocial consequences, consisting of anxiety and the fear of being afflicted again. Most mentees appreciated their mentor and some of those without mentors wished they had received organised support. Participants were often more dissatisfied than satisfied with the follow-up provided during recovery. Conclusions: After an AMI, follow-up is important during recovery, but the standardised information provided is inadequate. During recovery, people need help dealing with existential crises. After discharge, receiving peer support from lay people with similar experiences could be valuable. The knowledge gleaned from this study could be used in education at coronary care units and in health care outside the hospital setting. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 19.
    Junehag, Lena
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Asplund, Kenneth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Svedlund, Marianne
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Perceptions of illness, lifestyle and support after an acute myocardial infarction2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 289-296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    After an acute myocardial infarction (AMI), people are encouraged to adopt a healthy lifestyle. But they are not always motivated to maintain the necessary lifestyle changes and need the right support to do it. In sparsely populated areas, people afflicted by an AMI have difficulty in finding standard rehabilitation programmes near their homes during the recovery, so they need alternative forms of support. The aim was to describe individual perceptions of their lifestyle and support, 1year after an AMI, with or without mentorship. This study has a qualitative, descriptive design with data collected in individual interviews. Twenty men and women were interviewed 1year after their first AMI, and 11 had been offered contact with mentors who had had an AMI. Content analysis was used to analyse the data. Those with and without mentors had similarities and tendencies to variation in their perceptions, with both a positive and negative view of life. The participants were aware of the necessity of living a healthy lifestyle but some resisted doing so. They wished to live as before, and all saw the future positively. Having a mentor with the same experience could be valuable for some people, but more research is needed to understand the lack of motivation to make beneficial lifestyle changes after a serious health event as AMI.

  • 20.
    Junehag, Lena
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Hochwälder, Jacek
    Division of Psychology, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Eskilstuna.
    Svedlund, Marianne
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Being a peer mentor for a person recovering from an acute myocardial infarction2016In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 6, no 5, p. 41-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Challenge after an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is to manage the disease and to prevent a second AMI. Other people with the same illness have a unique understanding of the situation; therefore, they can provide valuable support. Being a peer mentor and contributing one’s own experiences of the same illness can even lead to increased self-confidence. The aim was to describe personal perceptions of being a peer mentor for a person recovering from an AMI. Patients in three sparsely populated counties, who had experienced their first AMI the previous year, were offered contact with peer mentors. The peer mentors had experienced an AMI between one and ten years ago. Sixteen of them were interviewed after one year as mentor. The interview texts were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Two themes summarized the interview results, “being in charge” and “being comfortable”, which incorporated six subthemes. The peer mentors also answered a questionnaire, and according to the purpose of the study, certain parts of the questionnaires were analysed using a paired-sample t-test. The dimensions measured in the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R) showed significant increased mean values, including Illness Coherence (p ≤ .001) and Emotional representation (p ≤ .05). Highlights of the results included that being a peer mentor led to feelings of pride and that peer mentors should be preceded by a careful matching between patients and mentors.

  • 21. Larsson, Mona
    et al.
    Svedlund, Marianne
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Aktivitetsutförandeproblem i samband med höftledsoperation: en intervjustudie av kvinnor och män.2007In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 4-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22. Lindqvist, Therese
    et al.
    Persson, Lina
    Svedlund, Marianne
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Sjuksköterskestudenters attityder till att ta emot vård av en manlig eller kvinnlig sjuksköterska2007In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 4-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Svedlund, Marianne
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    CCN's view on myocardial infarction inpatients (manus)Manuscript (preprint) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Svedlund, Marianne
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    The perspective of hope related to myocardial infarction. (manus)Manuscript (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Svedlund, Marianne
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Women with acute myocardial infarction: Meaning of lived experiences, narrated by patients, partners and nurses2000Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
  • 26.
    Svedlund, Marianne
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Axelsson, Inge
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Acute myocardial infarction in middle-aged women: narrations from the patients and their partners during rehabilitation2000In: Intensive and Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 256-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to examine the meaning of lived experiences after an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and being a partner to an afflicted woman, as it is narrated during rehabilitation. Nine women and their partners narrated their experiences three and twelve months after AMI. The interview texts were transcribed and then interpreted, using a phenomenological-hermeneutic method inspired by the philosophy of Ricoeur. The result showed that their experiences of the illness contained two themes: 'rehabilitation needed' and 'loss of freedom' which contains eight sub-themes; 'adapting to it', 'struggling against it', 'living as normally as possible', 'having insight into how it can be', 'feeling guilty and ashamed about being weak', 'withholding feelings', 'feeling useless', and 'feeling fatigued and losing strength'. After further interpretation, the themes gave a deeper meaning of living with AMI and how it affects women and their partners. The women conceded that they felt distressed and vulnerable but struggled against the fear the illness means. The partner's role appears to be one of trying to adapt to the women's experiences of the illness. That the women withheld their feelings and did not talk about them indicates a lack of communication between the couples. As coronary care nurses often come very close both to the afflicted persons and the relatives they fill an important function in each patient's recovery. The nurses could help and prepare the patients and their relatives to understand better such feelings and reactions as could appear after discharge from hospital.

  • 27.
    Svedlund, Marianne
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Danielson, Ella
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Commentary on Svedlund M and Danielson E (2004) myocardial infarction: narrations by afflicted women and their partners of lived experiences in daily life following an acute myocardial infarction. Journal of Clinical Nursing 13, 438-446 - Response2005In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 409-410Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Svedlund, Marianne
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Danielson, Ella
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Myocardial infarction: Narrations by afflicted women and their partners of lived experiences in daily life following an acute myocardial infarction2004In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 438-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The review of the literature showed that many people and their family members share feelings of distress after an acute myocardial infarction. Therefore, it is important to show how the illness affects the relationship in the couple's daily life when the closest relatives involved are men. AIM: The aim was to illuminate the meaning of lived experiences in daily life after an acute myocardial infarction, as narrated by afflicted women and their partners. METHODS: Nine women and their partners narrated their experiences three and 12 months after an infarction. The interview texts were then interpreted, using a phenomenological hermeneutic method, inspired by the philosophy of Ricoeur. The text was divided into meaning units that were condensed and abstracted. Two themes and eight sub-themes were then extracted from the text. RESULTS: The first theme was 'living in a changed life situation' with the sub-themes: 'showing consideration', 'taking responsibility', 'living side by side' and 'desiring what to do'. The second theme was 'looking to the future' with the sub-themes: 'feeling uncertain', 'feeling powerless', 'feeling limited' and 'feeling hope'. CONCLUSIONS: The results revealed that couples lived in a changed life situation, somewhat in 'discordance', and showed consideration to each other in order to protect the partner. There seemed to be a lack of verbal communication, but both women and their partners revealed that they sensed how their partners felt without verbal communication. In this 'discordance', couples may experience loneliness, in that they may not share feelings about the event and the situation it causes. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Women and their partner have specific needs in daily living following an acute myocardial infarction. Therefore, nurses should acknowledge the specific needs for the female patient and the partner more clearly.

  • 29.
    Svedlund, Marianne
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Danielson, Ella
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Norberg, A.
    Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå.
    Women’s narratives during the acute phase of their myocardial infarction2001In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 197-205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. The purpose of this study was to illuminate the meaning of lived experiences during the acute phase of an acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Method. Ten women (< 60 years old) afflicted with AMI narrated their experiences during their stay in the coronary care unit (CCU). The interview texts were interpreted using a method with a phenomenological hermeneutic approach, inspired by the philosophy of Ricoeur. The text was divided into meaning units that were condensed and abstracted. Three themes were then extracted from the text. Findings. One theme was ‘oneself as vulnerable’ with the subthemes: ‘the feeling of being dependent upon others’, ‘the feeling of being insulted’ and ‘the feeling of being a troublesome person’. Another theme was ‘oneself as distanced’, with the subthemes: ‘not facing the reality’, ‘captive in an unreal situation’, and ‘inhibition out of concern for others’. The last theme was: ‘oneself as making sense’ with the subthemes: ‘acquirement of some insight’ and ‘discovery of a new meaning with life’. Conclusion. The reported comprehensive understanding revealed the phenomena guilt and shame. These, in combination with the experience of being in an unreal situation and the withholding of feelings may have led to a deterioration of communication. It seems that relatives and the staff at CCU were not allowed to share the burden of being afflicted with an AMI.

  • 30.
    Svedlund, Marianne
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Danielson, Ella
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Umeå universitet. Institutionen för omvårdnad.
    Men's experiences during the acute phase of their partners' myocardial infarction1999In: Nursing in Critical Care, ISSN 1362-1017, E-ISSN 1478-5153, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 74-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The men's narratives about the women reveal a disturbance in the balance of their daily life, showing how they, the men, perceive powerlessness, and also how they passively adapted themselves to what happened. The narratives reveal that the women are 'ignoring and withholding' their feelings and that they want to be as 'responsible and independent' as they used to be. The women are disclosed as 'not wanting to face reality': there is an enervating lack of communication.

  • 31.
    Svedlund, Marianne
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Danielson, Ella
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Umeå universitet. Institutionen för omvårdnad.
    Nurses' narrations about caring for inpatients with acute myocardial infarction1999In: Intensive and Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 34-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to examine the meaning of lived experiences of caring for people affected by acute myocardial infarction. Thirty-four registered nurses at a Coronary Care Unit in the north of Sweden narrated their experiences of this specialized care of inpatients. The interview texts were transcribed and then interpreted using a phenomenological-hermeneutic method, inspired by the philosophy of Ricoeur. Two groups of texts were identified. One comprised 'narratives about the patient' within which were the themes: 'distancing oneself from what is happening' and 'showing oneself as vulnerable'. The other was 'narratives about caring', with the themes: 'reading of', 'adapting', 'coming close' and 'helping'. Various views on caring were disclosed and interpreted with reference to Martin Buber's philosophy. A comprehensive understanding of caring as oscillations between the poles distance and relation was formulated.

1 - 31 of 31
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