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  • 1.
    Akambih Tajam, Joseph
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Fröling, Morgan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    SMALL SCALE IN-SITU BIOREMEDIATIONOF DIESEL CONTAMINATED SOIL –SCREENING LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE2010In: ECO-TECH´10, 22-24 November 2010, Kalmar, Sweden: International Conference on Natural Sciences and Technologies for Waste and Wastewater Treatment, Remediation, Emissions Related to Climate, Environmentaland Economic Effects / [ed] FABIO KACZALA, SANDRINE ARZUR, IDA TJÄDER WILLIAM HOGLAND, 2010, p. 827-835Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Spillage of diesel oil and other petroleum products is a commonly creating need for siteremediation of contaminated soils. In Sweden the most common remediation action isexcavation of the contaminated soil and off site biological treatment by composting.However, a number of small sites spread out in rural areas end up low on priority lists, andwill not be attended to within foreseeable future if ever. For such areas a low cost, easy toapply remediation techniques would be of interest. Enhanced bioremediation of dieselcontaminants in soil by whey addition has been demonstrated in lab scale. Whey is a byproductfrom cheese production. A first pilot remediation trial on an actual site in Gäddede,County of Jämtland, was started the summer of 2010. Using this site as a case study ascreening life cycle assessment model has been set up. The goal of the study was toinvestigate the environmental performance of the whey method, to benchmark the wheymethod toward the excavation and composting practice and to identify environmental hotspots in the whey treatment life cycle. The study aims at establishing if further work shouldbe put into developing the method, or if the environmental performance is such that the wheymethod should be abandoned. It should be noted that even with a slightly worseenvironmental performance compared to other remediation alternatives whey treatment couldstill be of interest, since the small scale sites in rural areas we talk about here otherwise mostoften would not be attended to.Results from the screening life cycle assessment indicate a rather good environmentalperformance of the whey method, partly depending on impact category considered. For thewhey method, impacts from farming activities in the milk production chain allocated to thewhey give significant contributions. Transportation gives important impacts from both thewhey method and the excavation and off site composting, thus logistics should always beconsidered and optimized. The whey on-site treatment could be an interesting alternative forbioremediation especially at sites that would not otherwise be treated, due to small size orremote location.

  • 2. Berg, S.
    et al.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Högskolan i Östersund.
    Analysis of airborne organic lead1984In: Biological effects of organolead compounds, Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press , 1984, p. 278-Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3. Berg, S.
    et al.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Högskolan i Östersund.
    Two-dimensional gas chromatography for determination of volatile compounds in ambient air1984In: HRC & CC, Journal of High Resolution Chromatography and Chromatography Communications, ISSN 0344-7138, Vol. 7, no 12, p. 687-695Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Bergkvist, Lisa
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Jonsson, Elisie
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Haller, Henrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Carbon Sequestration Potential f Agroforestry Systems For Phytoremediation In Chinandega, Nicaragua2018In: Linnaeus Eco-Tech 2018: 11th International Conference on the Establishment of Cooperation among Companies and Institutions in the Nordic Countries, the Baltic Sea Region and the World / [ed] William Hogland, 2018, p. 211-211Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Greenhouse gases in the atmosphere have increased to earlier unrecorded levels, causing global climate change that increases GMT and threaten ecosystems and livelihoods. IPCC report suggest that agroforestry offers considerable carbon sequestration (c seq.) potential, especially for developing countries. The purpose of this study is to estimate the c seq. potential in different agroforestry systems suitable in Chinandega, Nicaragua - a deforested region where the ground is polluted by toxaphene and other POP:s. Three scenarios where studied; Shading system using Tectona grandis and Pogostemon cablin; Alley cropping using Erythrina poeppigiana and Ricinus communis and Silvopasture using Cordia alliodora and Brachiaria ruziziensis, the last scenario being divided into two subscenarios; unmanaged (grazed) and managed (harvested) grass. Calculations were performed using the modelling program CO2FIX v. 3.2, with a runtime of 100 years and assuming deforested area with no previous land use. Results show a significantly higher c seq. potential in Shading system (168/217 MgC/ha). Alley cropping yields 71 MgC/ha and Silvopasture results in 80/84 MgC/ha unmanaged and 65/70 MgC/ha managed. The higher number includes products from harvest. All scenarios show fluctuations over time due to thinning and harvesting practices. Phytoremediation potential of POPs has been shown in Ricinus communis and grass species. Soil c seq. is especially important to consider in longterm scenarios as this c seq. can be sustained over longer time. The inclusion of crop residue, the effect of grazing animals or changes in density of trees and crops and environmental fate of the toxic compounds need further assessment before considering large scale applications. Agroforestry practices could contribute to several benefits, including climate change mitigation and phytoremediation.

  • 5.
    Grönlund, Erik
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Barthelson, Mats
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Englund, Andreas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Carlman, Inga
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Fröling, Morgan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    van den Brink, Paul
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Ekoteknik (Ecotechnics / Ecotehcnology) – 30 Years of Experience in Interdiciplinery Education2014In: Proceedings of the 20th International Sustainable Development Research Conference Trondheim 18-20 June 2014: Resilience – the new research frontier, Trondheim: Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Product Design , 2014, p. 17-21Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An important part of a society’s resilience is how prepared it is to cope with the changing conditions during the alpha and omega phases according to resilience theory. Lars Thofelt, an academic from the mid Sweden region, early recognized this need for students to develop skills needed for a societal change, and devoted his life to pedagogy suitable for this. The main outcome of his achievement was the interdisciplinary university program in Ecotechnics/Ecotechnology (Ekoteknik in Swedish), at Mid Sweden University. Ecology, economy and technology in cooperation for sustainable development were the original approach, and still are.Thofelt’s ideas had a main focus of helping students develop their inherent capabilities of solving problems and overcome obstacles. After Thofelt’s 12 years at the program his ideas were carried on by former colleagues and students, and the teaching further developed with a mix of the Thofelt tradition and other experiences brought in by new employees. This paper describes this interdisciplinary teaching approach with special focus on development of resilience capacity in students.It was concluded that 1) a key element to develop resilience skills in students is to push them to a self-propelled learning behavior rather than traditional teaching, 2) not too easily provide the students with answers will develop their problem solving skills, 3) doing-before-reading teaching is more time consuming but seem to give deeper knowledge, 4) interdisciplinary teaching will in the long run benefit from having the interdisciplinary team within the department, rather than as a conglomerate of several departments.

  • 6.
    Haller, Henrik
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Amaranth for phytoremediation of toxaphene-contaminated soil in Nicaragua - assessment of translocation in three cultivars2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Haller, Henrik
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Organic By-Products For Sustainable Soil Remediation - The Effect Of 3 Different Amendments On The Degradation Of Diesel Fuel In A Tropical Ultisol.2014In: ECO-TECH 2014 / [ed] Fabio Kaczala, Jelena Lundström, Joacim Rosenlund and William Hogland, Kalmar: Linnaeus University , 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In many tropical developing countries, economic incentives are small for soil remediation to take place. Such locations demand special strategies that are energy-efficient, locally adapted and economic. In situ technologies are appealing where energy and material costs are more limiting than the time factor. One potentially sustainable and economic way to enhance the self-organizing capacity of soil ecosystems is by applications of locally available organic by-products to stimulate the polluted ecosystem´s inherent capacity to heal by utilising the embodied energy of the organic pollutant itself, as an energy source for the necessary biochemical transformations. Tropical climate is favourable for biodegradation but many tropical soils are rich in clay which can inhibit the bioavailability of the pollutant and reduce biodegradation kinetics.  A pilot scale experiment was performed in order to assess the capability of three amendments based on by-products; whey, pyroligneous acid and compost tea, to enhance degradation of diesel in ultisol. Biweekly applications of 6 mL whey kg-1 soilsignificantly increased the degradation rate but no positive effect on degradation was found of any of the other amendments.

  • 8.
    Haller, Henrik
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Suistainable Building Engineering.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Suistainable Building Engineering.
    Phytoremediation and Agroforestry- mitigation of climate change, poverty reduction and cleaning of soils2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Haller, Henrik
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Fröling, Morgan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Application of ecological engineering within the framework for strategic sustainable development for design of appropriate soil bioremediation technologies in marginalized regions2018In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 172, p. 2415-2424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores a systematic strategy to design appropriate bioremediation projects for marginalized regions that have the potential to contribute to sustainable development in that region. Ecological Engineering (EE) is of particular value for the development of appropriate bioremediation technology for such regions but a stricter planning tool than provided by EE itself, is also needed when the goal of the project goes beyond remediation targets. The Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development (FSSD) applies basic principles for sustainability and includes a stepwise strategic planning mechanism for their application. The inclusion of EE within the FSSD may steer soil bioremediation projects in rural areas in developing countries and sparsely populated regions in industrialized countries towards sustainability. The utility of the approach was tested on two cases of soil pollution in marginalized regions: the Chinandega region in Nicaragua (pesticide polluted agricultural soil) and a former filling station (diesel polluted residual area) in Gäddede, northern Sweden. The study demonstrates how the inclusion of the EE key concepts within the FSSD may increase the utility of EE for strategic sustainable development within the region. No difficulties in terms of conflicting suggestions were found in the proposed integrated approach; the two tools were found to contribute on different aspects to provide support to project management and decision making.

  • 10.
    Haller, Henrik
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Fröling, Morgan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    TURNING WASTE INTO A RESOURCE FOR REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SOIL IN TROPICAL DEVELOPING COUNTRIES2012In: PROCEEDINGS LINNAEUS ECO-TECH 2012 / [ed] E. Kumar, J. Rosenlund, F. Kaczala and W. Hogland, 2012, p. 468-480Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Contaminated soil from industrial or agricultural activities poses a health threat to animals and humans and can also have a detrimental effect on economic systems by making land unsuitable for agriculture and other economic purposes. This problem is of particular concern in tropical developing countries where agriculture is the economic base. Traditional methods for soil remediation are often expensive and energy consuming. In-situ bioremediation has been proposed as a cheaper alternative to conventional methods in areas where remediation would otherwise not be implemented. Despite encouraging results in the laboratory, the practice of in-situ bioremediation is limited, partially due to its inefficiency at low temperatures. The objective of this study is to provide an inventory of some waste products that potentially can be used as amendments for in-situ bioremediation in developing countries in tropical climate. Emphasis has been given to map efficient methods that are appropriate to economically marginalised people in such countries. Waste from livestock operations, crop residues and processing waste constitute the major waste flows in many developing countries. A number of organic by-products can potentially be used to stimulate microbial activity for bioremediation purposes. Three amendments; whey, pyroligneous acid and compost teas were selected to be studied in detail due to their liquid nature and documented capacity to stimulate microorganisms with capacity to degrade pollutants. Experiments are needed to determine their potential for in-situ bioremediation in developing countries in tropical climate.

  • 11.
    Haller, Henrik
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Lacayo Romero, Martha
    Laboratorio de Biotecnologia, UNAN-Managua, Nicaragua.
    Jarquín Pascua, Martha
    Laboratorio de Biotecnologia, UNAN-Managua, Nicaragua.
    Bioaccumulation and translocation of field-weathered toxaphene and other persistent organic pollutants in three cultivars of amaranth (A. cruentus ‘R127 México’A. cruentus ‘Don León’ y A. caudatus ‘CAC 48 Perú’) – A field study from former cotton fields in Chinandega, Nicaragua2018In: Ecological Engineering: The Journal of Ecotechnology, ISSN 0925-8574, E-ISSN 1872-6992, Vol. 121, p. 65-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Soils polluted by persistent organic pollutants threatens habitats for plants and animals as well as basic human needs such as food security and provision of potable water. Toxaphene is a persistent organic pollutant that was heavily used as a pesticide in Central America, Brazil, Soviet Union etc. until it was banned in 1993. The objective of this study was to determine the bioaccumulation and translocation characteristics of three different cultivars of amaranth in soils contaminated with field-weathered toxaphene and other POPs in former cotton fields in Chinandega, Nicaragua to identify safety issues for human consumption and/or potential for phytoremediation. The concentration of toxaphene and other POPs in the edible parts of the amaranth (leaves and seeds) exceeded the maximum residue level for human consumption established by the European Union for most of the tested compounds. Concentrations of toxaphene congeners and other POPs were found in all vegetative organs. Many substances were accumulated to concentrations more than 10 times higher than in the soil. Of the three cultivars, A. caudatus 'CAC48 Perú' and A. cruentus 'Don Leon' presented the highest average BAF. None of the 3 cultivars can be considered a panacea hyperaccumulator for either toxaphene alone or in conjunction with other POPs but since many agricultural soils comprise a range of different contaminants, the broad-spectrum bioaccumulating capacity of amaranth can make it an interesting candidate for phytoremediation.

  • 12.
    Haller, Henrik
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Montenegro Rayo, Katja
    Laboratorio de Biotecnologia, UNAN-Managua, Nicaragua.
    Dávila López, Anielka
    Laboratorio de Biotecnologia, UNAN-Managua, Nicaragua.
    Microbial transport of aerated compost tea organisms in clay loam and sandy loam: A soil column study2016In: International Biodeterioration & Biodegradation, ISSN 0964-8305, E-ISSN 1879-0208, Vol. 106, no January, p. 10-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Soil bioaugmentation is a promising approach with applications in agriculture and in bioremediation of polluted soil. One way of supplying microorganisms to the soil that has received increasing attention during the last decade is by the addition of compost teas. The success of such strategies depends on whether the organisms are capable of migrating through the soil and reaching its target, i.e. the pollutants or soil pathogens. The structural conditions of the soil affect the microbial migration rate and this study aims to determine the migration rates of microorganisms found in aerated compost tea through both a sandy loam and a clay loam in soil columns. A considerably higher proportion of the microorganisms from the aerated compost tea were deposited at 2 cm in the sandy loam compared to the clay loam. Microbial deposition was concentrated to the top 2 cm in the sandy loam and then decreased abruptly at 10 cm whereas the clay loam presented an irregular pattern. Despite a favourable particle size distribution for microbial transport, the sandy loam retained a greater proportion of the microorganisms present in the aerated compost tea in the top 2 cm, presumably because the lower bulk density and higher soil organic matter in the clay loam aided transport and growth of microorganisms. The limited migration of aerated compost tea microorganisms in sandy soil suggests that its efficiency for bioremediation or pathogen control may be limited below 2 cm depth in similar soils. Our results indicate that in less dense soil with higher soil organic matter content the efficiency may be higher.

  • 13.
    Iraguha, Gasore
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Simons, Steven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Haller, Henrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Montenegro, Katia
    Biotechnology Laboratory, UNAN-Managua, Nicaragua.
    Using an integrated planning guide for the selection and design of a multi-process strategy for bioremediation of toxaphene and heavy metal contaminated soil in a tropical region2016In: Proceedings of the Linnaeus Eco-Tech Conference on Natural Sciences and Technologies for Waste and Wastewater Treatment, Remediation, Emissions related to Climate, Environmental, and Economic Effects.: The Tenth International Conference on the Establishment of Cooperation between Companies and Institutions in the Nordic Countries, the Baltic Sea Region and the World. / [ed] William Hogland, Linnaeus University , 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The application of pesticides and inappropriate soil management during intensive cotton farming in Chinandega, Nicaragua has left the soil with high residues of toxaphene and potentially several toxic metalloids and heavy metals from the overuse of mineral fertilizers. Most effective remediation approaches are relatively expensive and use technologies that are energy-intensive and hence not applicable in regions with low economic incentives for remediation.

     

    The selection of appropriate and low-cost approaches for soil remediation requires a structured and systematic process to ensure reliable outcomes with low environmental impact. The ideal situation is if such projects could contribute to a sustainable development in the region where the remediation is taking place. An Integrated Planning Guide which includes the key concepts of Ecological Engineering within the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development was used in the identification and design of some applicable and efficient approaches for the clean-up of soil in Chinandega.

     

    This resulted in the design of a multi-process bioremediation strategy that meets the sustainability criteria of the Integrated Planning Guide and that has the potential to degrade toxaphene and remediate heavy metals and metalloids in the soil using Jatropha curcas L. for phytoremediation in combination with Bio-augmentation, biochar as a soil amendment, and the use of biochar and alginate as carriers of toxaphene degrading inocula.

  • 14.
    Jonsson, Anders
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Agerberg, Sebastian
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Modelling of E. coli transport in an oligotrophic river in northern Scandinavia2015In: Ecological Modelling, ISSN 0304-3800, E-ISSN 1872-7026, p. 145-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the development of a model for calculation of Escherichia coli transport in oligotrophic river waters, using temperature dependent inactivation rate for E. coli and flow velocity characteristics of the river and lakes. A total of 209 temperature measurements from 11 years surveillance were used to calculate transport distances until 90% inactivation of the E. coli. Three scenario sets of different site specific values for the first order reference inactivation rate constant k20 (0.145, 0.230 and 0.555 day−1) and temperature coefficient of the rate constant Q10 (2.07, 1.50 and 1.86) were tested in the upper parts of river Indalsälven, in northern Scandinavia. The first and third parameter sets represented respectively pristine water and lake water while the second setting was considered most representative of river Indalsälven. All three scenarios demonstrated considerable transport distances of E. coli with a clear and structured seasonal variation. The longest transport distances observed during late winter and spring are caused by a combination of low water temperature and high water velocity. The results have implications for water management decisions within the watersheds of oligotrophic rivers in cold and temperate climate.

  • 15.
    Jonsson, Anders
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Agerberg, Sebastian
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Modelling of E.coli transport in river waters as a means to investigaterelationships between settlements within the riparian zone and faecal pollutionof water bodies2013In: / [ed] Dr Christophe Baehr, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The naturally oligotrophic rivers of northern Sweden are generally characterized by a low pollution level and high hygienic quality. E.coli, an indicator of fresh faecal contamination, shows however increasing trends and two recent outbreaks of the Cryptosporidium parasite in city drinking water supplies has caused much concern about drinking water security and ecological status of water bodies. There is also an increasing demand for scenic plots of land close to rivers and lakes for both permanent dwellings and holiday cottages and there is a need for better understanding of relationships between settlements within the riparian zone and river water quality.

     

    Measurements of E.coli are made at fixed sampling points along the river. A transport model for E.coli in river water was developed based on literature data for E.coli inactivation rates, water temperature and hydrological conditions. The model was used to estimate the source distance upstream each sampling point in the investigated section of the river. This procedure enabled the establishment of sections of the river that could influence each sampling point by point or diffuse emissions of E.coli. Studies on human development within the riparian zone of each section could then be related to E.coli data at the sampling points.

     

    Data on the latest 20 years of development within the riparian zone was gathered from the local municipality archive which contains information on all new and changed properties. The development data was compared to 18 years long time series of seasonal water quality measurement in the studied river. The analysis also considers the effects of known point sources of faecal pollution within the investigated sections such as discharge from municipal sewage treatment plants.

     

    This study shows that E.coli is transported considerably longer during winter compared to summer in a regulated section of the river. Lower water temperatures in the winter increases the survival time of E.coli but there is also a strong effect of water regulation for hydro-electric power generation that completely changes the water flow pattern to relatively higher flow during the wintertime compared to non regulated parts of the river. Both these effects increases the transport distance of E.coli. The study also shows the importance of considering the features of the nearby water body when planning for new settlements.

  • 16.
    Jonsson, Anders
    et al.
    Högskolan i Östersund.
    Berg, S.
    Determination of 1,2-dibromoethane, 1,2-dichloroethane and benzene in ambient air using porous polymer traps and gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis with selected ion monitoring1980In: Journal of Chromatography A, ISSN 0021-9673, Vol. 190, p. 97-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Jonsson, Anders
    et al.
    Högskolan i Östersund.
    Berg, S.
    Bertilsson, B.M.
    Methylnitrite in the exhaust from a methanol-gasoline fueled automobile1979In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, Vol. 8, p. 835-841Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Jonsson, Anders
    et al.
    Högskolan i Östersund.
    Berg, Sven
    Determination of low-molecular-weight oxygenated hydrocarbons in ambient air by cryogradient sampling and two-dimensional gas chromatography1983In: Journal of Chromatography A, ISSN 0021-9673, Vol. 279, p. 307-322Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Jonsson, Anders
    et al.
    Högskolan i Östersund.
    Bertilsson, B-M
    Organic nitrites in the exhaust emissions from alcohol fueled vehicles1982In: Proceedings of the Fifth International Alcohol Fuel Technology Symposium: Vol. 3, 1982, p. 179-186Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Jonsson, Anders
    et al.
    Högskolan i Östersund.
    Bertilsson, Britt-Marie
    Formation of Methyl nitrite in engines fueled with gasoline/methanol and methanol/diesel1982In: Environmental science and technology, ISSN 0013-936X, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 106-110Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Jonsson, Anders
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Haller, Henrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Ecological engineering to improve the sustainability of soil remediation inremote locations and developing countries2013In: / [ed] Dr Christophe Baehr, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Toxic compounds from industrial activities accumulate in the ecosystems at an unsustainable rate. Ecological engineering has been proposed as a tool to design ecosystems that integrate human society with its natural environment for the benefit of the both. Bioremediation is generally considered an ecological engineering practice but even if it addresses one of the core goals of ecological engineering, i.e. restoration of damaged ecosystems, bioremediation can be energy-intensive and have low reliance on self-design, particularly if excavation and ex situ methods are employed.

    From a thermodynamic point of view, most organic pollutants are composed of molecules with high embodied energies and free energy potential that are appealing features for the use of ecological engineering, especially in locations where economic incentives are small for any kind of remediation to be performed,

    Based on positive experiences from an ongoing research project in Nicaragua, in which by-products and waste material are used as primary feedstock, it is concluded that the principles of ecological engineering can be useful to make in situ bioremediation a more sustainable practice in remote locations and developing countries.

  • 22.
    Jonsson, Anders
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Haller, Henrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Sustainability Aspects of In-Situ Bioremediation of Polluted Soil in Developing Countries and Remote Regions2014In: Environmental Risk Assessment of Soil Contamination / [ed] Maria C. Hernandez-Soriano, InTech, 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Jonsson, Anders P
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Entropy, Free Energy and the Creation of Order out of Chaos2016In: Society’s steering systems – a Friend book to Inga Carlman / [ed] E. Grönlund & A. Longueville, Östersund: Avdelingen för Ekoteknik och Hålbart Byggande , 2016, p. 57-73Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Jonsson, Anders
    et al.
    Högskolan i Östersund.
    Persson, K.A.
    Grigoriadis, V.
    Measurements of some low molecular-weight oxygenated, aromatic, and chlorinated hydrocarbons in ambient air and in vehicle emissions1984In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, Vol. 11, no 2-4, p. 383-392Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25. Jonsson, Anders
    et al.
    Törnqvist, Margareta
    Rannug, Agneta
    Ehrenberg, Lars
    Mutagenicity of methyl nitrite in Salmonella typhimurium1983In: Mutation Research - Genetic Toxicology and Environmental Mutagenesis, ISSN 0165-1218, Vol. 117, no 1-2, p. 47-54Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Jonsson, Anders
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Östberg, Tomas
    Jegrelius Institute for Applied Green Chemistry, Studiegången 3, SE-831 40 Östersund.
    The effects of carbon sources and micronutrients in whey and fermented whey on the kinetics of phenanthrene biodegradation in diesel contaminated soil2011In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 192, no 3, p. 1171-1177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper demonstrates significant effects on phenanthrene degradation in diesel contaminated soil by the addition of organic amendments such as whey and fermented whey. Both amount of amendment added and mode of administration was shown to be decisive. There was a strong positive effect on the 14C-mineralization of phenanthrene by multiple (bi-weekly) additions of fermented whey 210mgdwkg-1 soil dw (FW multi) and also by single dose addition of 2100mg dw sweet whey kg-1 soil dw (SW high). The most prominent effects on phenanthrene degradation kinetics were a five to fifteen fold increase in the linear growth term (k2) and a 23-27% increase in bioavailability factor S0 for SW high and FW multi respectively. Also, total mineralization at the end of the experiment increased from 46% in the control to 66 and 71% respectively and the lag time was reduced from 21 to 15 days by multiple addition of fermented whey. The most significant stimulating effects on phenanthrene degradation kinetics could be attributed to lactate and vitamins. This study demonstrates a more complex dependence of carbon sources and growth factors for an aromatic compound such as phenanthrene in comparison to hexadecane.

  • 27. MacDonald, J.C.
    et al.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Högskolan i Östersund.
    Ethyl nitrite: The in vivo synthesis of a mutagenic substance from tobacco smoke and ethanol1981In: Acta Chemica Scandinavica, ISSN 0904-213X, Vol. 335, p. 485-487Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Mikaelsson, Lars-Åke
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Carlman, Inga
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Fröling, Morgan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Danielski, Itai
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Grönlund, Erik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Jonasson, Jonas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    van den Brink, Paul
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Nilsson, Nils
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Hållbara utvecklingsprocesser. Projektrapport 2015-03-312015Report (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Norgren, Robert
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Suistainable Building Engineering. Ragn-Sells AB, Timrå, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Suistainable Building Engineering.
    Björkqvist, Olof
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Bio-sludge from the pulp and paper industry as feed for black soldier fly larvae: A study of critical factors for growth and survival2019In: Waste and Biomass Valorization, ISSN 1877-2641, E-ISSN 1877-265XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pulp and paper bio-sludge (PPBS) has low economic value and is therefore often composted or incinerated. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the feasibility of using PPBS to breed black soldier fly (Hermetia illucens) larvae (BSFL), so improving resource efficiency and supplying protein and fat to the animal feed market. BSFL were reared on PPBS in a climate chamber on a laboratory scale in order to assess nutrient deficiency, inhibition and whether the BSFL recycle the PPBS well or not. The PPBS used came from a chemi-thermomechanical pulp/groundwood pulp mill. The effect of supplementing nutrient solution added either into the PPBS or as a free liquid surface were studied. Prepupae dry weight, survival rate until prepupae stage and residual dry PPBS were measured. The addition of reference diet leachate into the PPBS did not have a significant impact on the weight of the prepupae (2.0 mg) but the survival rate was significantly higher (16.0 %). On the other hand, the addition of reference diet leachate as a free liquid surface had a significant impact on both the weight of the prepupae (4.8 mg) and the survival rate (25.7 %). The bio – conversion and PPBS – reduction was as best 0.4 % and 3.2 % respectively. This study has proven that the nutrients in PPBS are not readily available to the larvae. Addition of reference diet leachate increase the survival rate which opens up for possibilities of co-digestion. However, it is clear that under the tested conditions, BSFL is not recycling PPBS well and BSFL as a method for recycling of PPBS need further research.

  • 30.
    Pronoza, Lesya
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Dyer, Mark
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Haller, Henrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Lacayo Romero, Martha
    Biotechnology Laboratory UNAN-Managua, Nicaragua.
    The use of an integrated planning guide to steer phytoremediation projects towards sustainability using the example of Amaranth (Amaranthus) to remediate toxaphene polluted soils in a tropical region2016In: Proceedings of the Linnaeus Eco-Tech 2016 International Conference on Natural Sciences and Technologies for Waste and Wastewater Treatment, Remediation, Emissions Related to Climate, Environmental and Economic Effects.: The Tenth International Conference on the Establishment of Cooperation between Companies and Institutions in the Nordic Countries, the Baltic Region and the World / [ed] William Hogland, Kalmar: Linnaeus University , 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Soil pollution by pesticides is a serious problem, especially in developing countries where incentives are limited to remediate these soils. Toxaphene was a widely used insecticide during the 1950s – 1980s, but even after a total ban on its use in 2001 there are still many harmful consequences that can be observed. High levels of toxaphene on agriculture fields in Nicaragua continues to be a threat to local inhabitants and wildlife and to the surrounding ecosystems. Phytoremediation is one of the methods used for cleaning polluted soils. It requires growing plants in-situ and relies on their ability to absorb and accumulate or degrade toxic elements. Some advantages are environmental safety and cost-effectiveness.

    Amaranth (Amaranthus) was investigated as a primary candidate for the phytoremediation project. Beside this, some other plants, such as Cucurbita pepo, Spinacia oleracea, Medicago sativa, were reported to be able to successfully absorb common persistent organic pollutants. In addition, uptake mechanisms and patterns of distribution of toxic elements in plants were studied to determine further use of plants.

    To assess the viability and sustainability potential of implementing amaranth for phytoremediation, an Integrated Planning Guide (IPG) was used. The IPG uses a number of principles and concepts to provide guidelines for bioremediation actions. As a result, several conclusions and suggestions were produced, the most important being: amaranth has a potential for toxaphene uptake and has a high yield and historical significance; locally available poultry manure can be used as a fertilizer for amaranth; a monoculture should be avoided while growing amaranth; local community is the main driver of success and beneficiary of the project. Further research should be undertaken on this matter to improve the understanding of key factors for the success of the project.

  • 31.
    Skytt, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Nielsen, Sören Nors
    Section for Sustainable Transitions, Department of Planning, Aalborg University.
    Ståhl, Fredrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Grönlund, Erik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Carlman, Inga
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Fröling, Morgan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    A strategic tool to find out regional sustainability methodologies helpingindividuals to make long term decisions2015In: Proceedings of Global Cleaner Production and Sustainable Consumption, Barcelona Sitges, November 1-4, 2015, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a variety of definitions of the concept ‘sustainable’ to be found, and many interestingideas how to measure and evaluate what can be regarded as ‘sustainability’. Meanwhile,whatever the definition is used it must have a strong physical background. There is also acontinuous flow of information and a general awareness about the necessity of taking action,thereby reducing the negative anthropocentric contribution to global warming and ecologicalsystems depletion. A number of visions about (for example) future emission values typically 15-30 years from today are often presented. At the same time there is a continuous political debateabout the balance between individual freedom vs political regulations. The typical individual -standing in the intersection of all this - still seldom gets practical guidelines on how to act in thedaily life to meet future visions. This paper argues that it is necessary to simplify the indicatorsused to evaluate sustainability and at the same time ensure clear instructions of action therebyincreasing the communicability. This is believed to be possible through the application of aholistic approach based upon a detailed mapping, thus making it possible to find out an over-allstrategy and then transform it into specific guidelines for the individual to apply, taking anentrance point in a realistic description of individual everyday life. The regional level is chosenas the most suitable level to work with to keep in touch with the individual level without losingthe strategic possibilities and over-all view when attacking the problem. Without a deep andcommon understanding of the ‘daily life’ in the region, visions and guidelines might show to becounterproductive.For the Swedish region Jämtland, a sparsely populated area with large forests, a lot of hydropower, and one major city (Östersund with about 60.000 inhabitants), some industries and skiresorts (the largest being Åre), the method developed by Nielsen and Jørgensen for the minorisland named Samsø in Denmark has been chosen. By building a model for evaluating thecarbon balance and the work energy balances we are able to focus the strategies and make aguideline for individuals. It seems necessary to accept some usage of fossil fuels also in thefuture but we need to see how this usage can be steered to applications where non-fossilalternatives are less realistic. By working with sectors, built together, we are able to work withsub-models without having to compromise on either lower or higher level of societal activities.Compared to the Samsø case, Jämtland is more complex and also much larger (127.000inhabitants compared to Samsø’s 4.000 and with an area about 20% larger than theNetherlands). The sectors chosen are Industry (Businesses other than those covered in othersectors), Agriculture, Forestry, Tourism, Nature, Public, Private (households), Reindeerherding, Wastes and Energy. The budget of each sector is mapped in terms of carbon and workenergy balances as a sub-model of an over-all model of Jämtland. By finding out the limits(constrains) from simulations carried out on the region it is possible to set for example carbonand energy budgets as basis for personal guidelines for the citizens of the region.The major idea is that most citizens of the region will understand and adapt to such guidelinesto an extent that may induce a change of individual behavioral patterns thus turning the regiontowards sustainability. Jämtland has a specific “culture” which can be used to create proudnessand interest for the sustainability aims. It is important to arrange a platform that serves to shapea fruitful dialogue between all stakeholders – from individual to groups – that will make itpossible to create a common plan for measurements to be implemented, i.e. a concertedgovernance which ensure and guarantee a future of optimal existence for ecosystems as wellas human beings.

  • 32.
    Skytt, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Nielsen, Søren Nors
    Section for Sustainable Transitions, Department of Planning, Aalborg University, A.C.Meyers Vænge 15, Copenhagen SV, Denmark .
    Grönlund, Erik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Ståhl, Fredrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Carlman, Inga
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Fröling, Morgan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Interdisciplinary Cooperation And System Modelling As Means To Govern The Anthropocene2015In: Proceedings of the 59th Annual Meeting of the International Society for the Systems Sciences, international society for the systems sciences (ISSS) , 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The global development has now come to a critical state where humanity act as a new geological force and it is obvious that there are numerous of environmental problems which arise from the present geosphere-biosphere-anthroposphere interactions which urgently need to be addressed. This paper argues that systems analysis and modelling of environmental systems is one necessary part in successful governing of societies towards sustainability. In the 1960th many observations and data made it evident that the environment in most countries was in a bad state. To get a holistic view of the complex problems and to clarify the relationships of structure and function, systems thinking was applied e.g. modelling, cybernetics, systems analysis, life cycle assessment and energy and material flow analysis. Such tools used collectively, conceptualized as ‘integrated assessment’, can help to communicate fundamental knowledge, and to support decision-making when identifying, developing and implementing precautionary measures and solutions. There are good examples demonstrating the strength of such approaches; Solutions to the ozone depletion by replacing CFC’s with more chemically reactive compounds that are degraded within the troposphere. Acidification of European low buffer soils and lakes, sensitive to acid rain, has decreased due to concerted action on Sulphur emission control in large parts of Europe. The handling and recycling of solid waste has resulted in a considerable reduction of deposits in large parts of the world. This basically natural scientific knowledge has also influenced the development within e.g. economy and jurisprudence and today ecological economy and environmental law assume ecological systems as fundamental.

    The complexity of ecosystems and environmental issues can only be understood by use of advanced scientific tools such as modelling as a base for establishing interdisciplinary co-operation. Each component of such models will of course be an approximation, but validation and verification of the models will serve to make them useful. An ongoing research project at Mid Sweden University aims at building a complete carbon and energy balance model of an entire Swedish region, based on the Danish Samsø-model. Such models will make it possible to refer to a robust scientific base, thereby making it easier to argue for appropriate measures and actions. At the same time it will be clear what data these actions rest upon thereby making it easier to identify possible errors or limitations.

    Systems analysis and subsequent modes are constructs. According to systems theory and model development they are strategies as the best representations of nature, we can make. At the same time it must be assured, that a continuous adaptation and improvement in a studied area is possible - i.e. that model outcomes are matched with phenomenological observations and that empirical work also is carried out. Model development can therefore be characterized as a dynamic and iterative process.

    Governance in the Anthropocene must be based on an understanding of the problem picture at hand, and learning how to appropriately address increasingly complex issues. For identifying potential solutions and consequences of policy implementation, systems modelling on relevant levels will be one necessary tool. The current project developing an environmental regional model, illustrates how modelling can provide decision support for the county of Jämtland regarding management of energy resources and planning of future infrastructure, as well as serving regional and national information purposes.

  • 33.
    Vilches, Ana Paola
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Bylund, Dan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    ENHANCED NATURAL BIODEGRADATION OF DIESEL FUEL CONTAMINANTS IN SOIL BY ADDITION OF WHEY AND NUTRIENTS2010In: International Conference on Natural Sciences andTechnologies for Waste and Wastewater Treatment,Remediation, Emissions Related to Climate, Environmentaland Economic Effects: The Seventh International Conference on the Establishment of Cooperation between Companies and Institutions in the NordicCountries, the Baltic Sea Region, and the World / [ed] William Hogland, 2010, p. 1001-1008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The contamination of soils by petroleum hydrocarbons, such as diesel fuel, has since many years been a serious environmental problem. Treatment of contaminated areas is a concern for governments and environmental authorities in several countries and efforts have been done with the purpose to eliminate this problem. Different methods have been tested and today the most common technique involves the excavation and transportation of contaminated soil to special treatment facilities. In earlier studies we have demonstrated the effect of adding organic amendments, such as fermented whey, on the biodegradation of n-alkanes in diesel contaminated soil. Non-fermented sweet whey also proved significantly to enhance the biodegradation of an aromatic substance (phenanthrene) in contaminated soil.

    The current paper presents the results of an in-situ field test at a former gas station in the north of Sweden. In parallel to the field study, biodegradation profiles were monitored under controlled laboratory conditions by taking soil samples from the contaminated site and spike them with diesel fuel. The experiments were carried out by adding whey and mineral nutrients (NPK) to the test area and to the laboratory samples, and monitor the degradation of hydrocarbons by gas chromatographic analysis of extracted soil samples. Significant effects on the degradation rates were achieved in the laboratory tests. For the in-situ test, however, no such positive effects could be registered.

  • 34.
    Waller, Judith
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Andersson, Andreas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Wallin, Marcus
    Uppsala universitet.
    Sahlée, Erik
    Uppsala universitet.
    Measurements of carbon dioxide fluxes over an oligotrophic Boreal river in northern Scandinavia2018In: Book of abstracts : Linnaeus ECO-TECH '18: 11th  International conference on establishment of cooperation between companies and institutions in the Nordic countries, the Baltic Sea region and the world / [ed] Yahya Jani, Jelena Lundström, Viveka Svensson, William Hogland, Kalmar: Linnaeus University , 2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbon dioxide (CO2), as one of the major anthropogenic greenhouse gases, is widely acknowledged to contribute to global warming and climate change. Historically, the major focus on the role of the aquatic environment in the carbon cycle has been on the atmosphere-ocean exchange. More recent findings suggest the importance of freshwater (lakes, rivers and streams) as a source for atmospheric CO2. The freshwater contribution is, however, poorly understood, mainly due to a paucity of data, especially from running waters.

    To address this issue, eddy covariance (EC) measurements in a large boreal river in Northern Sweden (Indalsälven), are being made as part of a two-year long continual study of the carbon dioxide emissions between the air and water. This is one of the first known studies of its kind where EC measurements are conducted in a river setting. Continual data acquisition began in April 2018, monitoring a variety of general meteorological parameters, turbulent emissions of carbon dioxide, latent, and sensible heat, together with water-side measurements of CO2. The aim of the study is to investigate the temporal control on river carbon dioxide emissions covering timescales from hours to seasons.

    This paper describes the ongoing work, and reports on the present status of the project. The primary focus lies on data that indicates a dependence of carbon dioxide flux on wind-speed. Wind speed demonstrates a positive correlation with the measured emissions, with the highest emissions measured corresponding to the directions where the upwind distance to land was greatest, indicating that the wind-generated turbulence has a strong influence on the carbon dioxide emissions over a boreal river.

  • 35.
    Östberg, Tomas
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Bylund, Dan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Lundström, Ulla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    The effects of carbon sources and micronutrients in fermented whey on the biodegradation of n-hexadecane in diesel fuel contaminated soil2007In: International Biodeterioration & Biodegradation, ISSN 0964-8305, E-ISSN 1879-0208, Vol. 60, no 4, p. 334-341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of organic amendments on the biodegradation of n-alkanes and phenanthrene in diesel contaminated soil was evaluated. The organic amendments used were fermented and non fermented sweet milk whey and the mineralization was estimated by analysis of evolved 14CO from added 14C-hexadecane, 14C-octadecane and 14C-phenanthrene. The addition of 2100 mg dry weight (dw) sweet whey kg-1 soil dw at the start of the experiment increased the extent of mineralization after 184 days compared to a control, from 45 % to 61 % for n-hexadecane and from 35 % to 46 % for n-octadecane. The stimulation was characterized according to a three-half-order kinetic such as if a greater part of the substrates was mineralized according to first order kinetics. Similar stimulation was achieved from the fermented whey when 210 mg dw kg-1 soil dw was added to the soil every second week during the 184 days of incubation.

  • 36.
    Östberg, Tomas
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Lundström, Ulla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Enhanced biodegradation of diesel fuel hydrocarbons in soil by the addition of fermented whey2005Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrial organic byproducts such as whey or fermented whey contain easily accessible carbon and micronutrients which could be used to stimulate microbial degradation of hazardous organic contaminants in soil. In this work we have investigated the possibility to use fermented whey as a growth supplement to enhance the aerobic degradation of diesel fuel hydrocarbons in soil. Experiments were carried out with two soils, a sand soil and a loamy sand soil, contaminated with diesel fuel at a concentration of 5000 mg kg-1 soil dry weight (dw). Fermented whey was added at different dosages to nutrient amended soil microcosms. Petroleum hydrocarbon mineralization was monitored by analysis of evolved 14CO2 from added 14C-labeled n-hexadecane. Mineralization curves were fitted to a three-half-order kinetics model. Enhanced mineralization was observed in sand soil at 7 and 22C and in loamy sand soil at 22C but the stimulatory effect was most pronounced in the sand soil at 22C, where the addition of 6 and 60 ml fermented whey kg-1 soil dw, increased the final degree of n-hexadecane mineralization from 49% in the control soil to 60 and 67% respectively. The increased total mineralization was characterized by an increase in the amount of substrate mineralized by first-order kinetics despite a decrease in the first order rate constant, k1. The highest concentration of fermented whey, 60 ml kg-1, gave rise to substrate competition, diauxie, which resulted in an extended lag phase.

  • 37.
    Östberg, Tomas
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Lundström, Ulla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Enhanced degradation of n-hexadecane in diesel fuel contaminated soil by the addition of fermented whey2007In: Soil & sediment contamination: an international journal, ISSN 1532-0383, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 221-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this work has been to investigate the possibility of using fermented whey as an organic growth supplement in order to enhance the aerobic degradation of n-hexadecane in soil. Fermented whey was added at different dosages to nutrient amended soil microcosms contaminated with 5000 mg diesel fuel kg-1 dry weight (dw). The target substance was 14C-labeled n-hexadecane, and the biodegradation was monitored by analysis of evolved 14CO2. Biodegradation curves were fitted to a three-half-order kinetics model. Enhanced biodegradation was observed in sand at 7 and 22C and in loamy sand at 22C but the effect was most pronounced in the sand soil at 22C. The addition of 6 or 60 ml fermented whey kg-1 soil dw, increased the degree of n-hexadecane biodegradation at the end of the experiment, 167 days, from 49% in the untreated sand to 60 or 67% respectively. This increase in biodegradation was characterized by an increase in the amount of substrate biodegradation by first-order kinetics despite a decrease in the first order rate constant, k1. The highest concentration of fermented whey, 60 ml kg-1, gave rise to substrate competition, diauxie, which resulted in an extended lag phase.

  • 38.
    Östberg, Tomas L.
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Jonsson, Anders P
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Lundström, Ulla S.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Accelerated biodegradation of n-alkanes in aqueous solution by the addition of fermented whey2006In: International Biodeterioration & Biodegradation, ISSN 0964-8305, E-ISSN 1879-0208, Vol. 57, no 3, p. 190-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of fermented whey on the aerobic degradation of n-alkanes by a microbial consortium was investigated in an aqueous system. Microbial degradation of 100 mg n-alkanes (C12, C14, C16 and C18) in mineral nutrient medium was assessed by measuring the decrease in n-alkanes, production of CO2 and increase in biomass. The addition of fermented whey at a concentration of 5 mg dry weight to a nutrient medium receiving a small-sized inoculum (103.4 CFU ml-1)shortened the lag phase from 8 to 3 days, but the degradation rate during the degradation phase was not enhanced. The shortened lag phase at low initial concentration of microorganisms indicates that the fermented whey stimulates growth in the initial phase, without reducing the consortium's capacity for n-alkane degradation.

1 - 38 of 38
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