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  • 1. Harder, Maria
    et al.
    Golsäter, Marie
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Lyssna till barnets röst vid hälsobesöket2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Holmström, Malin
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Olofsson, Niclas
    Asplund, Kenneth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Kristiansen, Lisbeth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Exploring the development of school children´s health2012In: British Journal of School Nursing, ISSN 1752-2803, E-ISSN 2052-2827, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 189-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore the association between positive self-reported health(SRH) in pre-school and 4th grade SRH in a long–term prospectivepopulation-based study in Sweden.Methods: Data originated from the Health Dialogue (HD) a structuredinstrument used by school nurses. 1084 children participated. Oddsratios were analyzed.Results: In 10-year-old children’s SRH, comfort in school, normal BMIand absence of headaches were shown to be significantly importanthealth indicators. Normal BMI showed to have a potentially causaleffect on 10-year-old girls and absence of headaches showed apotentially causal effect among 10-year-old boys.Conclusion: Schools should be designed to meet the children’s needsso that they are perceived as comfortable, safe and secure places.Schools should advocate physical activity and play, serve healthynutritious food in order to motivate, support and promote a healthylifestyle. Schools are a unique arena for health promotion as they reachpractically all school-age children.

  • 3.
    Holmström, Malin
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Olofsson, Niclas
    Kristiansen, Lisbeth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Assessing the validity and reliability of the "Health Dialogue" in 10-year-olds2013In: British Journal of School Nursing, ISSN 1752-2803, E-ISSN 2052-2827, Vol. 8, no 8, p. 384-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:

    The aim was to assess the concurrent, construct and convergent validity of the Health Dialogue questionnaire (HD) in 4th grade in compulsory school, through comparison of the HD questionnaire with Pediatric Quality Of Life Inventory (PedsQL), and Health Behavior in School-aged Children (HBSC).

    Methods:

    A sample was created from the HD n=1956, HBSC, n=1500 and PedsQL n=425. An exploratory factor analysis was performed in order to evaluate the construct validity of HD.

    Results:

    A majority of the questions show acceptable concurrent validity and the results support the HD as a valid 16-item three factorial model for school children aged 10 years old (grade 4). The HD's three factorial model's degree of explanation was 39% of the school children's health in school settings.

    Conclusion:

    The HD questionnaire is a valid instrument for measuring 10-year-old school children's self-reported-health and to identify positive health factors.

  • 4.
    Häggström, Marie
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Bergsman, Ann-Christin
    Region Gävleborg.
    Månsson, Ulrika
    Norrbotten County Council.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Learning to manage vasoactive drugs: A qualitative interview study with critical care nurses2017In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 39, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Being a nurse in an intensive care unit entails caring for seriously ill patients. Vasoactive drugs are one of the tools that are used to restore adequate circulation. Critical care nurses often manage and administer these potent drugs after medical advice from physicians.

    Aim: To describe the experiences of critical care nurses learning to manage vasoactive drugs, and to highlight the competence required to manage vasoactive drugs.

    Research methodology/setting: Twelve critical care nurses from three hospitals in Sweden were interviewed. Qualitative content analysis was applied.

    Results: The theme "becoming proficient requires accuracy, practice and precaution" illustrated how critical care nurses learn to manage vasoactive drugs. Learning included developing cognitive, psychomotor, and effective skills. Sources for knowledge refers to specialist education combined with practical exercises, collegial support, and accessible routine documents. The competence required to manage vasoactive drugs encompassed well-developed safety thinking that included being careful, in control, and communicating failures. Specific skills were required such as titrating doses, being able to analyse and evaluate the technological assessments, adapting to the situation, and staying calm.

    Conclusion: Learning to manage vasoactive drugs requires a supportive introduction for novices, collegial support, lifelong learning, and a culture of safety.

  • 5.
    Häggström, Marie
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Fjellner, Cajsa
    Region of Jämtland Härjedalen.
    Öhman, Marie
    Region of Jämtland Härjedalen.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Ward visits- one essential step in intensive care follow-up: An interview study with critical care nurses’ and ward nurses’2018In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 49, p. 21-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to describe critical care nurses’ and ward nurses’ perceptions of the benefits and challenges with a nurse-led follow-up service for intensive care-survivors at general wards. Background: Patients recently transferred from intensive care to the general ward are still vulnerable and require complex care. There are different models of intensive care follow-up services and some include ward visits after transfer from intensive care. Research methodology/design: This study had a qualitative design. Data from 13 semi-structured interviews with Swedish critical care nurses and ward nurses were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Findings: The findings consisted of one theme, namely, “Being a part of an intra-organisational collaboration for improved quality of care”, and four subthemes: “Provides additional care for the vulnerable patients, “Strengthens ward-based critical care”, “Requires coordination and information”, and “Creates an exchange of knowledge”. The nurse-led follow-up service detected signs of deterioration and led to better quality of care. However, shortage of time, lack of interaction, feedback and information about the function of the follow-up service led to problems. Conclusion: The findings indicate that ward visits should be included in the intensive care follow-up service. Furthermore, intra-organisational collaboration seems to be essential for intensive care survivors’ quality of care. 

  • 6.
    Häggström, Marie
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Personcentrerad vård2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Häggström, Marie
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Jong, Mats
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Establishing Patient Safety in Intensive Care -A Grounded Theory.: Building Trust-Important for Patient Safety2017In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 07, no 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The modern intensive care unit (ICU) is a complex and high-risk environment, and even small adverse events and changes may deteriorate the patient’s conditions and eventually cause harm. Many factors can potentially be associated within an increased amount of errors, leading to adverse events. Nurses, nurse managers, and other leaders all play important roles in establishing patient safety. Aim: This study aimed to obtain a deeper understanding of leaders’ and nurses’ main concerns in establishing patient safety in Swedish intensive care units. Method: A grounded theory methodology was used. Data from 15 interviews with leaders and nurses involved in critical care in Sweden were collected, analysed and constant compared. Findings: The main concern in establishing patient safety was promoting quality of care, work engagement, and staffs well-being in strained ICUs. The core category building trust explained how the leaders’ and nurses’ strove for quality of care and wished a healthy, safe work environment. This is further explained in the categories “Being an accessible and able leader”, “Creating knowledge and understanding”, and “Establishing collaborative practice”. Conclusion: Establishing patient safety in the ICU requires that staffs enjoy going to work, have good work relations, are committed and want to stay at the unit. A healthy, salutogenetic unit with a work environment marked by trust provides a better opportunity to establish patient safety, and various leaders have potential to achieve this.

  • 8.
    Karlström, Annika
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Parental  groups during pregnacy and the child's first year: Swedish parents' experiences2019In: The Journal of Perinatal Education, ISSN 1058-1243, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 19-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to assess parents' experience of parental support given before and after childbirth in a mid-Sweden region. A coherent education program implemented in a mid-Sweden region was evaluated. Data from two different samples of parents was collected through questionnaires. From the antenatal classes 563 women and men took part in the study. The other sample consisted of 176 parents from the child health care classes. The vast majority of parents from both groups were content with the sessions and their overall view was very positive. Both men and women felt strengthened before birth and in their parental role. New knowledge about breastfeeding and children's needs were gained. New thoughts about equal parenting and children's needs and development were achieved to a limited extent.

  • 9.
    Kleebthong, Duangkaew
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Chareonsuk, Sukjai
    Boromarajonani College of Nursing, Chakriraj, Thailand.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Porskrog Kristiansen, Lisbeth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences. Högskolan i Gävle.
    Family members' perceptions and experiences of older people displaying major depression2020In: Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, ISSN 0883-9417, E-ISSN 1532-8228Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Kristiansen, Lisbeth
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Karlström, Annika
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Boman, Niklas
    Jonsson, Cathrin
    Olofsson, Niclas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    A health promotion intervention strengthening Swedish high school students' wellbeing: A feasibility study2018In: British Journal of School Nursing, ISSN 1752-2803, E-ISSN 2052-2827, Vol. 13, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The majority of Swedish school children enjoy a general good health. Still, mental health problems are increasing among young people in Sweden. According to Swedish law all school staff members (teachers and student health professionals) have mutual responsibility to provide a safe school environment and health. Since 2010, there is an emphasis on health promotion in schools. The aim of this study is to describe the feasibility and pilot outcomes of a health promoting intervention targeting healthy high school students (the Strengthening Adolescent Wellbeing [SAW] project).

    A descriptive design was used with an intervention group that was assessed before and after the implementation of the programme using quantitative methods. The study was based on the Medical Research Council Framework. The study and the data collection were performed during the autumnof 2016 and the early spring of 2017.

    Public high school students' health professionals, that is school nurses, student counselors and specialist educators, facilitated a research-based intervention consisting of eight sessions with education and mind-body practices. Pre- and post-testing were carried out.

    The main findings showed enhanced levels of wellbeing among the participating students and the student-related measures all showed improvements.

    The intervention seems to have been feasible in this context. Findings from this study indicate that the SAW methodology contributed to an improvement in high school students' wellbeing. The study will provide a base for a full-scale evaluation study intended to evaluate the effect of this health-promoting programme.

  • 11.
    Kristiansen, Lisbeth
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Olofsson, Niclas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Assessing the Construct Validity and Reliability of School Health Records Using the 'Health Dialogue Questionnaire' in the Eleventh Grade2016In: AIMS Public Health, ISSN 2327-8994, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 470-486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims: The aim for this study was to assess the construct validity and reliability of the Health Dialogue Questionnaire (HDQ (c)) for eleventh grade in school through comparison of the HDQ (c) with Paediatric Quality Of Life Inventory (PedsQL (TM)), Local monitoring of youth policy questionnaire (LUPP (R)), Health behaviour in Swedish school-aged children (HBSC (c)), Equal health (EH (c)) and The Swedish Survey Youth on Alcohol Consumption (SSYAC (c)). Methods: Cross-sectional samples of eleventh graders from the academic year 2009/2010 was used from the HDQ (c) (n = 2752), the HBSC (c) (n = 2090), the PedsQL (TM) (n = 666), the "LUPP (R)" questionnaires (n = 2400), EH (c) (n = 258), and SSYAC (c) (n = 1748) in the academic year 2009/2010. A comparison between HDQ (c) and the different proxies was done. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were performed as well as a Multitrait-Multimethod Matrix (MTMM), in order to evaluate the construct validity and reliability of HDQ (c). Results: An average disagreement between HDQ (c) and proxies with 10 percentages was found. Exploratory factor analysis of HDQ (c) on the 2009/2010 sample suggested a four factor solution (girls factor solution 65% of total variance explained, and in the boys' solution 59% of total variance explained). A second sample 2010/2011 of eleventh graders were used for the confirmatory solution. Almost perfectly similar four factor solutions with were found (girls 58% of total variance explained and boys 56% of the total variance explained). Using MTMM the reliability was generally high and HDQ (c) and showed agreeable validity. Discussion and conclusions: The HDQ (c) questionnaire is a reliable and valid instrument for measuring eleventh graders self-reported-health in school.

  • 12.
    Olofsson, Niclas
    et al.
    Department of Research and Development, Vasternorrland County Council, Sundsvall Hospital, Sweden.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Kristiansen, Lisbeth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Assessing the Construct Validity and Reliability of School Health Records of the ‘Health Dialogue Questionnaire,’ in 7th Grade in Compulsory School2015In: MOJ Public Health, ISSN 2379-6383, Vol. 2, no 1, article id 00010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim for this study was to assess the construct validity and reliability of the Health Dialogue Questionnaire (HDQ), 7th grade in compulsory school through comparison of the HDQ, with Paediatric Quality Of Life Inventory (PedsQLTM), Local monitoring of youth policy questionnaire (LUPP®) and Health behaviour in Swedish school-aged children (HBSC).Design and methods: A sample was created from HDQ (n= 2008), PedsQLTM (n=477), LUPP (n=2648), HBSC, (n=1500) andan exploratory factor analysis was performed in order to evaluate the construct validity of HDQ of the school children´s health in school settings.Results: The results supported the HDQ as a valid 24 items factorial model, for girls a five factorial model and for boys a four factorial model for school children aged 13 years old (grade 7). The girls' model explained 63 % of the variance, while the boys' model explained 58 % of the variance. A majority of the questions showed an agreeable concurrent and discriminant validity.Conclusions: The HDQ questionnaire is a valid instrument for measuring 13-year-old school children's self-reported-health.Keywords: Adolescents; Construct Validity; Factor Analysis; Health Dialogue Questionnaire; Health Promotion

  • 13.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Att vara ung och leva med långvarig sjukdom2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Being part of a team-Healthcare personnel experiences of supporting youth with diabetes Type 12019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Diabetes i skolan2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Diabetes in school (DIS)- a qualitative multiperspective study of Swedish pupils conditions for diabetes management in school2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Elevers erfarenheter av hälsosamtalet i skolan2019Report (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Exploring pathways of overweight and obesity among schoolchildren age 6-13 years2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Föräldrarstöd i barnhälsovården2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Health among preschool children in a Swedish context: Based on the Health Dialog2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Hälsa bland sexåringar2014In: Hälsa bland sexåringar, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Hälsosamtalets betydelse för skolbarns hälsa2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Hälsosamtalets betydelse för skolbarns hälsa2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Hälsosamtalets betydelse för skolbarns hälsa2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Relational Based Health Practice: A Challenge For School Nurses2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Skolbarns hälsa i Västernorrland2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Skolsköterskan som hälsoarbetare2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Skolsköterskans som hälsoarbetare2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Supporting youth with diabetes type 1- Experiences from parents and healthcare personnel2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    The Health Dialogue concept: School children's Self-Reported-Health in a Swedish Context2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this thesis was to explore and describe schoolchildren's selfreported-health based on the Health Dialogue concept as well as to identify healthindicators and their possible associations in the perspective of 6 to 16 year-olds,and to provide an analysis of school nurses´ experiences of using the HealthDialogue concept, in the County of Västernorrland. The thesis was based on fourstudies (I-IV). Study I was qualitative using a descriptive design, based onindividual interviews with school nurses who had working experience of using theHealth Dialogue concept. Studies II-IV were quantitative with cross sectional andlongitudinal design based on statistical data from the Health Dialogue concept, apopulation survey among schoolchildren. The data were analyzed usingqualitative content analysis (I) and regression analyses (II-IV).Study I showed that the school nurses had developed their own commonapproach, a health promotion model derived from experiences of working with theHealth Dialogue concept. Study II showed that the most important health variablesinfluencing pre-schoolchildren´s positive self-reported-health were experience ofcomfort in preschool, good sleep, absence of headaches, being physicalactive/playing daily, and not being a victim for bullying. Both boys and girlsneeded to experience comfort, being physical active, and not being bullied. Forgirls, positive self-reported-health seemed to be more dependent on comfort, beingphysical active/playing, and not being bullied, whereas boy’s health was moredependent on eating school lunch daily and not experiencing headaches.Study III revealed that in 10-year-old children´s positive self-reported-health,comfort in school, normal iso- body mass index and absence of headaches wereshown to be significantly important health indicators. Normal iso- body massindex (girls) and absence of headaches (boys) were shown to have a potentiallycausal effect on 10-year-old children's positive self-reported-health. Study IVrevealed several significantly important health indicators in schoolchildren´shealth during three school transitions in the Swedish Education system (betweenthe ages of 6-10, 10-13 and 13-16); not experiencing being sad/depressed,afraid/worried, experiencing the school environment positively (schoolyard andivrestrooms), not being bullied, having good sleep, daily physical activity/play andability to concentrate. Gender and age differences were also identified. The HealthDialogue concept, contributes increased knowledge and a new cross sectional andlongitudinal perspective to individual, school, community and organization’sperception of schoolchildren´s self-reported-health. Furthermore, these resultsdemonstrate the importance and validity of children´s experiences in the context ofhealth and should contribute to future health promotion activities and schoolbasedinterventions.Key words: Health promotion, health dialogue, longitudinal design, school nurses,schoolchildren, self-reported-health.

  • 31.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    To integrate and manage diabetes in school: Youth’s experiences of living with Type 1 diabetes in relation to school – a qualitative study2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In Sweden, each year approximately 700 children develop Type 1 diabetes (T1D).

    Objective: To describe youths’ experiences of living withT1D in relation to school.

    Method: A qualitative research design, interviews with youth with T1D. The interviews were subjected to qualitative content analysis

    Results: Three themes were identified: to be friends with the diabetes, striving for normality and receiving support from others. Living with T1D was a struggle for normality, independency and the youth needed to be friends with diabetes to handle everyday self-management. Although there are demanding life and school circumstances, it eventually becomes possible for the youth to handle the illness and to integrate and manage diabetes in school.

  • 32.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Transitions in the Swedish School system and the impact on student's positive self-reported health2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Utvärdering av föräldrastödsprogram.2018Report (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Youth’s experiences of living with Type 1 diabetes in relation to school2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Asplund, Kenneth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Kristiansen, Lisbeth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Promoting a relationship-based health practice: A challenge for school nurses2013In: British Journal of School Nursing, ISSN 1752-2803, E-ISSN 2052-2827, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 30-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    School nurses have a unique opportunity to promote health when they meet school children during the Health Dialogue. The Health Dialogue concept is used by all the school nurses in a county in Mid Sweden.

    Aim:

    To describe school nurses' experiences of the Health Dialogue concept.

    Methods:

    A qualitative descriptive study with latent content analysis of interviews performed during February–April 2012, where 16 school nurses participated.

    Findings:

    The school nurses experienced the Health Dialogue concept as a useful tool to work with school children's health in a relationship-based, child focused, structured, and systematic way, which was reflected in one overarching theme: 'To be in a relationship-based, health-promoting practice.' However, school nurses also experienced loneliness and frustration from the many difficult situations with school children, and they indicated needs for further collaboration.

    Conclusions:

    The Health Dialogue concept is child-focused, systematic and structured, but it requires further development and continuing work on statistical feedback. School nurses indicated a need for collaboration with teachers, parents, and other health professionals, as well as professional-reflective supervision.

  • 36.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Häggström, Marie
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Audulv, Åsa
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Junehag, Lena
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Coyne, Imelda
    Trinity College Dublin.
    Söderberg, Siv
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    To integrate and manage diabetes in school: Youth's expereinces of living with Type 1 diabetes in relation to school- a qualitative study2017In: International Diabetes Nursing, ISSN 2057-3316, E-ISSN 2057-3324, Vol. 14, no 2-3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, each year approximately 700 children develop Type 1 diabetes. Living with the illness is a challenge for youth and requires adjustments to lifestyle, and to manage school. The aim was to describe youths’ experiences of living with Type 1 diabetes in relation to school. A qualitative research design was used and interviews were performed with eight girls and five boys with Type 1 diabetes. The interviews were subjected to qualitative content analysis. Three themes were identified: to be friends with the diabetes, striving for normality and receiving support from others. Results showed a need to increase the understanding of T1D and diabetic competence within the Swedish school system and knowledge of youths’ own experiences is vital in this work. Living with T1D was a struggle for normality, independency and the youth needed to be friends with diabetes to handle everyday self-management. Although there are demanding life and school circumstances, it eventually becomes possible for the youth to handle the illness and to integrate and manage diabetes in school.

  • 37.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Häggström, Marie
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Söderberg, Siv
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Being Facilitators in a Challenging Context-school Personnel's Experiences of Caring for Youth with Diabetes Type 12018In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 43, p. e114-e119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to describe school personnel's experiences of caring for youth with diabetes type 1.

    Design and Methods: A qualitative design was chosen for this study. Data were collected with individual interviews that were subjected to inductive qualitative content analysis. The sample consisted of 24 school personnel (teachers, principals and school nurses) from Swedish schools. All had experience with youth aged 6 to 18 years old with diabetes type 1.

    Results: School personnel experienced caring for youth with diabetes type 1 as “Being facilitators in a challenging context” and described establishing trusting relationships, finding strategies to support self-care, feeling uncertain and incapable in need of education, and dealing with unclear responsibility.

    Conclusions: School personnel (teachers, principals and school nurses) are key professionals supporting youth with diabetes type 1 and self-care in school. Lack of education and unclear responsibility created feelings of uncertainty and insecurity for school personnel and a need for mandatory education of school personnel regarding T1DM and self-care, including legislation was identified.

    Implications: Mandatory education should be provided for all school personnel regarding diabetes type 1, self-care and current legislation. A liason position in form of a nurse specialist should manage the education. 

  • 38.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Häggström, Marie
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Söderberg, Siv
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Experiences from Parents to Children with Diabetes Type 1.2018In: JSM Health Education Primary Health Care, ISSN 2578-3777, Vol. 3, no 2, article id 1044Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: When a child is diagnosed with a long-term illness such as diabetes type 1(DT1) parents often find it stressful to give optimum support to the child and to manage the situation especially when the child is in school. Parents experience that the stress to manage life with Diabetes Type 1, means to constant monitor blood glucose, to assist with insulin injections, food intake and physical activity, in order to optimum disease management. Aim: To explore how parents’ of children with Diabetes Type 1 experienced their role as a parent. Material and method: A qualitative design was used and individual interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 13 parents (10 mothers and 3 fathers) of children with Diabetes Type 1. The interviews were analyzes using qualitative content analysis. Results and conclusions: The analysis resulted in one theme A life change revealing new needs with four subthemes; Struggling with fear and searching for explanations, Learning to manage and getting control of a lifelong illness, Collaboration with school as an important support and Managing the illness influenced work and family finances. Parents in this study struggled for their children at all times, to be the child’s caregiver and to take care of the child’s life in the best possible way. They asked for flexible and continue diabetes education for themselves and for school staff efficient communication and cooperation between parents/families, healthcare and school.

  • 39.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Junehag, Lena
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Velander, Sofie
    Lundberg, Susanna
    Ek, Bosse
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Häggström, Marie
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Nurses’ experiences of prehospital care encounters with children in pain2019In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 43, p. 23-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pain relief in children is a complex issue, partly an ethical dilemma and due to a lack of nursing competence. There are few studies regarding prehospital care encounters with children in pain. Aim: The aim of this study was to describe nurses’ experiences in prehospital care encounters with children in pain and the specific related challenges. Method: This study has a qualitative design. Eighteen Swedish nurses participated in three focus group interviews analysed using qualitative content analysis. Findings: The findings consist of a theme, “A challenge to shift focus and adjust to the child”, and three categories describing prehospital care encounters with children in pain: “Being receptive and focusing on care,” “Developing a trusting relationship,” and “Providing professional nursing care.” Caring for children in pain was stressful for the nurses. The nurses described how they had to shift focus and used different methods to build trust, such as playfulness, making eye contact, attracting curiosity, and using the parents to create trust. The also had to adjust to the child regarding dosages and materials. Conclusion: Nurses has to be practically, mentally, and theoretically prepared to care for children with prehospital pain. It is essential to evaluate the administration of adequate pain relief to children, and more evidence-based knowledge is necessary concerning the different modes of administering pain-relieving drugs to prehospital children. 

  • 40.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Kristiansen, Lisbeth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Transitions in the Swedish school system and the impact on student's positive self-reported-health2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To explore three schools based transitions and their impact on positive Self- Reported- Health (SRH), pre-school to elementary school (6–10 y), elementary school to junior high school (10-13y) and junior high school to upper secondary school/high school (13-16y), in a long-term longitudinal population based study. Methods: The study followed three cohorts through one school transition each. A longitudinal study with data from 6693 children and their Health Dialogue Questionnaires© were used. Data were collected in the middle of Sweden during 2007–2012 with school children age 6–16 years old. Results: Several significant factors were identified impacting the positive SRH among children age 6-16y; not feeling sad or depressed, afraid or worried, positive school environment (schoolyard and restrooms), not bullied, good sleep, daily physical activity and ability to concentrate. There was no single factor identified, the factors differed according to gender and age. Conclusion: The study has identified several gender and age specific factors for successful school transitions relevant for a positive SRH. This is valuable information for school staff, parents and school children and provides a possibility to provide support and assistance when needed.

  • 41.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Kristiansen, Lisbeth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Transitions in the Swedish School system and their impact on student's positive self-reported health2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: School transitions are often difficult times for children andfacilitating successful transitions requires attention to be given to thefactors impacting children’s self-reported-health (SRH) during thesetransitions.This will allow support to be directed towards any positive factors.The Health Dialogue concept (HD) is an approach used by Swedish school nurses to identify health factors with impact on schoolchildren’s positive SRH during transitions. This long-term prospectivepopulation study aimed to explore student self-reported-health during three school transitions: pre-school to elementary school (6-10y); elementary school to junior high school (10-13 y), and junior high28school to upper secondary school/high school (13-16 y).Method: A longitudinal study with data from 6693 HD’s conducted inSweden during 2007-2012 with school children aged between 6-16years old. Logistic regression, odds ratios and OR were analyzed.Results: Several significant factors were identified which had apositive impact for SRH among children of 6-16 y; not feeling sad ordepressed, not feeling afraid or worried, having a positive school environment, not being bullied, getting good sleep, daily physical activityand having an ability to concentrate.The relative importance of these factors differed according to genderand age.Conclusion: Application of the HD concept during school transitionscould provide new information on the factors impacting positive selfreported health among school children. Several significant healthfactors were identified which differed according to age and gender.Thus providing valuable information for school staff, parents andschool children, and raising the possibility of providing targeted support and assistance when required.

  • 42.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Marie, Häggström
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Kristiansen, Lisbeth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Skolsköterskans rolltransformering till den nya hälsofrämjande positionen: (The transformation of the school nurse’s role towards the new health-promoting position)2015In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 210-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim The aim of this study was to describe the role transformation of school nurses towards primary health promotion, and secondary preventive and health treatment work.Background According to the Swedish educational act, the school nurse profession has changed towards being mainly health promotion and secondary preventive and health treatment work.Method The study consisted of a qualitative study design with content analysis inspired by Elo and Kyngäs. Sixteen individual interviews were conducted with school nurses from across one county.Findings The role transformation towards a more health promotion was described by school nurses' statements. The process of the transformation differed among the school nurses. Three categories illuminated their work; professional approach, student-centred and collaboration.Conclusion The role transformation process required enhanced relation and communicational skills. Structured collegial supervision might support the process.

  • 43.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Olofsson, N
    Publ Hlth Ctr Harnosand, Cty Council Vasternorrland, Harnosand, Sweden.
    Kristiansen, Lisbeth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Asplund, Kenneth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Health among 6-year-old children in a Swedish county: Based on the Health dialogue2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Olofsson, Niclas
    Folkhälsocentrum, Landstinget Västernorrland, Härnösand, Sweden.
    Asplund, Kenneth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Kristiansen, Lisbeth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Transitions in the Swedish school system and the impact on student's positive self-reported-health2014In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 14, p. Art. no. 1045-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To explore three school based transitions and their impact on positive self-reported-health (SRH), pre-school to elementary school (6-10 y), elementary school to junior high school (10-13y), and junior high school to upper secondary school/high school (13-16y), in a long-term longitudinal population based study. Methods: The study followed three cohorts through one school transition each. A longitudinal study with data from 6693 Health Dialogue questionnaires were used. Data were collected in the middle of Sweden during 2007-2012 with school children age 6-16 years old. Results: Several significant factors were identified with an impact for a positive self-reported-health among children age 6-16y; not feeling sad or depressed, afraid or worried, positive school environment (schoolyard and restrooms), not bullied, good sleep, daily physical activity and ability to concentrate. There was no single factor identified, the factors differed according to gender and age. Conclusion: The study have identified several gender and age specific factors for successful school transitions relevant for a positive SRH. This is valuable information for school staff, parents and school children and provides a possibility to provide support and assistance when needed.

  • 45.
    Rising Holmström, Malin
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Olofsson, Niclas
    Landstinget Västernorrland.
    Kristiansen, Lisbeth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Asplund, Kenneth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Health among   6-year-old children in a Swedish county: Based on the health Dialogue.2012In: Vulnerable Groups & Inclusion, ISSN 2000-8023, E-ISSN 2000-8023, Vol. febArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Aim: To explore the experiences of self-reported health (SRH) of 6-year-old boys and girls. Background: The goals for the Swedish School Health Services (SHS) are to identify health problems, take measures to prevent illness, and promote health. One approach used to achieve this is the use of the Health Dialogue (HD) questionnaire. The HD is offered at three occasions during compulsory school and once in high school; it follows the child’s development and growth from 6 to 16 years old. Methods: The HD is a structured questionnaire consisting of 15 questions related to health, each phrased in a positive manner. The HD represents a cross-sectional image of the child’s SRH according to the child and parents. The SRH in this study is based on the results from the 5259 HD questionnaires conducted during 20062009 with 6-year-old children and parents. OR were analyzed for the HD. Results: Experiencing comfortableness in preschool, good sleep, absence of severe headaches, being physical active/play every day, and not being a victim for bullying shows to be important preschool indicators for boys and girls. Discussion: The most important health variable tagging in the preschool children’s positive SRH was comfortableness in preschool. Both boys and girls need to feel comfortable in preschool to report a positive SRH in school. The girls seem to be more dependent on comfortableness, being physical active, and not being bullied while the boys need to have lunch in school every day and not to show symptoms like severe headaches. Conclusion: The most important health variable tagging the preschool children’s SRH is comfortableness in school. The HD can increase the knowledge of 6-year-old children’s SRH and also be a tool to gain further insight into children’s health by highlighting patterns in children’s SRH

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