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  • 1. Alebaki, Maria
    et al.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Threats and obstacles to resilience: Insights from Greece's wine tourism2017In: Tourism, Resilience and Sustainability: Adapting to Social, Political and Economic Change / [ed] Joseph M. Cheer and Alan A. Lew, Abingdon, Oxon, UK: Routledge, 2017, 1, p. 132-148Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Ankre, Rosemarie
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Kronenberg, Kai
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Opportunities and Challenges for Accessibility to Outdoor Recreation in an Urban Environment: A Case Study of Östersund, Sweden2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Practically all Swedes enjoy being out in nature and engaging in outdoor recreation activities. An important reason behind this is that they benefit from the Swedish Public Right of Access (Allemansrätten). Outdoor recreation is highlighted as a major contributor to good health, leads to a higher level of understanding of nature in an urban society, and can function as a means of integration and sustainable development. However, society and our constant search for new experiences are changing as does the practice of outdoor recreation.

    It is of interest to identify how different users participate in outdoor recreation and use nature. Previous studies show that outdoor recreation often is conducted close to where we live. Planning and management, along with information, are vital components leading to the accessibility and development of outdoor recreation. Accessibility for outdoor recreation relate to both physical and socio-economic conditions. Today, outdoor recreation for urban dwellers is highly dependent on access to natural areas close to cities, yet open spaces are increasingly under threat due to urban growth and development density. The Public Right of Access places new demands on future planning and management, for example in order to prevent conflicts with private landowners as there may be increased pressure on specific natural areas.

    The above issues are analyzed from the results of an online survey conducted in autumn 2016. The survey was sent to 3,000 randomly selected residents in Östersund, Sweden (response rate 32%). Additionally, municipal planning documents are examined. The results show that the respondents do not consider that access to nature is constrained. Rather they feel they lack the time to make full use of this accessibility. They also express a need for more information about nature areas. The results also show that those with higher education and higher income value outdoor recreation higher, but that they also have less time.

  • 3.
    Ankre, Rosemarie
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Kronenberg, Kai
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Möjligheter och utmaningar för tillgänglighet till friluftsliv och naturupplevelser: En fallstudie om Östersunds kommun2017Report (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Brouder, Patrick
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography. Brock University, Canada.
    Clavé, Salvador AntonRovira i Virgili University, Spain.Gill, AlisonSimon Fraser University, Canada.Ioannides, DimitriMid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Tourism destination evolution2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Outlining the need for fresh perspectives on change in tourism, this book offers a theoretical overview and empirical examples of the potential synergies of applying evolutionary economic geography (EEG) concepts in tourism research. EEG has proven to be a powerful explanatory paradigm in other sectors and tourism studies has a track record of embracing, adapting, and enhancing frameworks from cognate fields. EEG approaches to tourism studies complement and further develop studies of established themes such as path dependence and the Tourism Area Life Cycle. The individual chapters draw from a broad geographical framework and address distinct conceptual elements of EEG, using a diverse set of tourism case studies from Europe, North America and Australia. Developing the theoretical cohesion of tourism and EEG, this volume also gives non-specialist tourism scholars a window into the possibilities of using these concepts in their own research. Given the timing of this publication, it has great potential value to the wider tourism community in advancing theory and leading to more effective empirical research.

  • 5.
    Brouder, Patrick
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography. Brock University, Canada.
    Clavé, Salvador Anton
    Rovira i Virgili University, Spain.
    Gill, Alison
    Simon Fraser University, Canada.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Why is tourism not an evolutionary science?: Understanding the past, present and future of destination evolution2016In: Tourism destination evolution / [ed] Patrick Brouder, Salvador Anton Clavé, Alison Gill and Dimitri Ioannides, Routledge, 2016, p. 1-18Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Brouder, Patrick
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography. School of Tourism and Hospitality, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography. Department of Geography, Geology, and Planning, Missouri State University, Springfield, MO, United States .
    Urban Tourism and Evolutionary Economic Geography: Complexity and Co-evolution in Contested Spaces2014In: Urban Forum, ISSN 1015-3802, E-ISSN 1874-6330, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 419-430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban tourism is an important research topic whether in mass tourism resortareas where tourism is the economic staple or in metropolitan areas where it is one (ormore) development path(s) among many. Urban areas are dynamic and fast-pacedenvironments but are also places where social and economic inequalities are moststark. Economic geography is one theoretical perspective through which researchersaddress urban tourism. The recent“evolutionary turn”in economic geography isfinding its way to tourism studies but has only been applied to a few urban tourismcases. This paper sets out the potential of evolutionary economic geography (EEG) as aconceptual framework for urban tourism studies. The analysis draws on recent studiesof urban tourism from an evolutionary perspective to highlight the strengths of takingsuch an approach and a number of avenues yet to be explored are put forward. Urbantourism affects large numbers of residents and businesses as well as influencing labourflows, and so understanding the dynamic nature of its development paths is vital.Tourism development does not occur in a vacuum, and urban tourism is one area wherethe complexity of the tourism economy and its place within broader regional develop-ment strategies is most obvious. Under recent neoliberal policies of urban development,tourism has become closely associated with place-based competition and large capitalinvestments. Urban tourism also enters the fray in matters of contested urban spaceswith issues of local governance, such as privatisation of public space, moving increas-ingly to the fore. The paper concludes with a list of future approaches to evolutionarystudies of urban tourism to broaden the scope beyond the dominant financial metrics oftourism success.

  • 7.
    Cetin, Gurel
    et al.
    Department of Tourism Management, Istanbul University, Turkey.
    Alrawadieh, Zaid
    Istanbul University, Turkey.
    Zeki Dincer, Mithat
    Istanbul University, Turkey.
    Istanbullu Dincer, Fusun
    Istanbul University, Turkey.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Willingness to pay for tourist tax in destinations: Empirical evidence from Istanbul2017In: Economies, ISSN 2227-7099, Vol. 5, no 2, article id 21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Revenue generated from tourism taxes constitutes an important financial resource for local governments and tourism authorities to both ensure tourism sustainability and enhance the quality of tourist experiences. In order for tourism policy makers to create an efficient and fair tax system in tourism destinations, it is crucial to understand travelers’ perceptions concerning willingness to pay (WTP), tax rates, and their optimal allocation. The objectives of this paper, therefore, are to evaluate tourism taxes as a compensation tool to cover the costs of tourism and to measure tourists’ WTP. The paper also suggests a fair allocation of tax revenues based on tourists’ perceptions. A qualitative approach was used and data were collected through semi-structured in-depth interviews with international travelers to Istanbul, Turkey. The findings suggest that tourists are more likely to pay an additional amount of tax when this is earmarked for improvements in their experiences, but they are reluctant to take on liability concerning matters relating to destination sustainability. Based on the travelers’ perceptions, the paper also identified areas that need investment to improve tourist experiences. An interesting highlight of this paper is that the majority of surveyed respondents reported that their travel decisions would not be negatively affected even if the total cost of their vacation increased by one third. The findings are expected to offer fresh and much-needed insights into tourist taxation for tourism policy makers and stakeholders.

  • 8. Debbage, K
    et al.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    The cultural turn: Towards a more critical economic geography of tourism2004In: A Companion to Tourism / [ed] Alan Lew, Allan Williams and Michael Hall, Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2004Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Fuchs, Matthias
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Fredman, Peter
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Tourism PhD Studies: A Swedish Experience-Based Perspective2015In: Tourism Education: Global Issues and Trends, Tourism Social Science Series, Volume 21 / [ed] Pauline J. Sheldon , Cathy H. C. Hsu, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2015, p. 61-79Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter offers an experience-based report about the development of the first Scandinavian PhD program in tourism studies at Mid-Sweden University. This process is documented through a framework which, rather than having the coherence of a single clearly bounded discipline, focuses on tourism as a study areaencompassing multiple disciplines. Tourism knowledge is derived through a synthesis of fact-oriented positivist methodologies and critical theory. The theoretical framework employed to develop the graduate program in tourism studies is presented by critically discussing its multidisciplinary base and briefly outlining future veins of further development.

  • 10.
    Fuchs, Matthias
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Fredman, Peter
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Development and Implementation of a Post-Graduate Programme in Tourism Studies: A Swedish Experience-Based Report2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    A review of 'Tourism and Innovation' (by C. Michael Hall and Allan Williams)2010In: Tourism Geographies, ISSN 1461-6688, E-ISSN 1470-1340, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 571-575Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    City Planners as Political Entrepreneurs: Do they exist; Can they exist?2015In: Entrepreneurship in the Polis: Understanding Political Entrepreneurship / [ed] Inga Aflaki, Evangelia Petridou, Lee Miles, Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate, 2015, p. 43-54Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    Department of Geography, Geology, & Planning, Missouri State University, Springfield, USA .
    Commentary: The Economic Geography of the Tourist Industry: Ten Years of Progress in Research and an Agenda for the Future2006In: Tourism Geographies, ISSN 1461-6688, E-ISSN 1470-1340Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    Department of Geography, Geology and Planning Missouri State University, USA .
    Editorial: Tourism in Borderlands2006In: Tourism Geographies, ISSN 1461-6688, E-ISSN 1470-1340, no 2, p. 99-101Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Hypothesizing the Shifting Mosaic of Attitudes through time: A Dynamic Framework for Sustainable Tourism Development on a ‘Mediterranean Isle’2008In: Tourism , Recreation and Sustainability: Linking Culture and the Environment, Wallingford, Ox. UK: CABI Publishing, 2008, 2, p. 50-75Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this chapter is twofold. It briefly reminds the reader of the major obstacles to implementing sustainable solutions in touristic environments. A principal impediment is that sustainability is a term fraught with ‘imprecision’ (Wall, 1997, p.33), since it holds varying meanings for different stakeholders (see also McCool and Stankey, 1999; Sauter and Leisen, 1999; Kousis, 2001). While researchers are well aware of this obstacle, the majority of existing studies examine these differences in attitudes from a cross-sectional standpoint. That is, investigations of the differing attitudes of players involved directly or indirectly in tourism’s development (e.g., developers, local government bureaucrats and politicians, national policy makers, tour operators, environmental protection groups, and local residents) tend to focus on a particular place at a single point in time. Johnson and Snepenger (2006) argue the reason for this fixation on cross-sectional studies is predictable since “it is pragmatically easier to acquire information at one point in time” but also because most researchers are under pressure to turn out publications within a short timeframe and do not have the luxury to commit themselves to lengthy studies (222).

    Unfortunately, however, the prevalence of such research inhibits our ability to understand the manner in which attitudes towards tourism of each set of stakeholders in a single locality are likely to change over time. In other words, while one group of players may be extremely accepting towards tourism compared to another at an early stage of the sector’s development, the respective perceptions of these two groups based on their experiences will most likely shift through time. In some cases perhaps the varying perceptions will become increasingly convergent, while in others differences in opinion may be enhanced. Given that it is crucial in any destination to include as many stakeholders as possible in the plan-making process to generate effective policy, it is apparent that adopting a longitudinal approach, examining changes over time would prove helpful for prescribing a general agenda for sustainable tourism development.

    Thus, the chapter reiterates the need for a conceptual framework that recognizes the effect that spatial/geographic and temporal/historic contingencies may have in influencing the attitudes of various stakeholders towards sustainability. A primary aim is to demonstrate the value of adopting a longitudinal model such as Butler’s (1980) widely used tourist-area life cycle to investigate the perspectives of different actors towards balanced-oriented growth at each stage of destination’s development.  In order to illustrate the use of such a conceptual framework for examining the shifting perceptions of stakeholders over time, the chapter draws on the experiences of island destinations in the Mediterranean.

  • 16.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Off the plan: the urbanisation of the Gold Coast2016In: Tourism Geographies, ISSN 1461-6688, E-ISSN 1470-1340, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 611-612Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 17. Ioannides, Dimitri
    Re-engineering estaqblished products and destinations2005In: Tourism Business Frontiers: Consumers, Products and industry / [ed] Dimitrios Buhalis & Carlos Costa, Butterworth-Heinemann, 2005, p. 77-84Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    The creation of leisure utopias: A new era in city building2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19. Ioannides, Dimitri
    Tourism and economics in host communities2002In: Tourism and host communities / [ed] S. Singh, D Timothy and R Dowling, London: CABI Publishing, 2002, p. 37-54Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Towards a new framework for modeling the regional impact of experiences2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21. Ioannides, Dimitri
    et al.
    Apostolopoulos, YorghosSönmez, Sevil F
    Mediterranean islands and sustainable tourism development: Practices, management and policies2001Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Brouder, Patrick
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Tourism and economic geography redux: evolutionary economic geography´s role in scholarship bridge construction2016In: Tourism destination evolution / [ed] Patrick Brouder, Salvador Anton Clavé, Alison Gill, Dimitri Ioannides, Routledge, 2016, p. 183-194Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Debbage, Keith
    University of North Carolina at Greensboro.
    Economic geographies of tourism revisited: From theory to practice2014In: The Wiley Blackwell Companion to Tourism / [ed] A. Lew, C.M. Hall, and A. Williams, Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Debbage, Keith
    University of North Carolina, Greensboro.
    The economy of tourism spaces: A multiplicity of  "critical turns"2011In: New Perspectives in Tourism Geographies: Space, place and tourism / [ed] Julie Wilson, London: Routledge, 2011Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25. Ioannides, Dimitri
    et al.
    Debbage, Keith G
    The economic geography of the tourist industry1998Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Halkier, Henrik
    Aalborg Univ, Dept Culture & Global Studies, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Lew, Alan
    Northern Arizona Univ, Dept Geog Planning & Recreat, Flagstaff, AZ 86011 USA.
    Special Issue introduction: Evolutionary economic geography and the economies of tourism destinations2014In: Tourism Geographies, ISSN 1461-6688, E-ISSN 1470-1340, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 535-539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tourism does not exist in isolation as an economic activity and is embedded in

    numerous highly complex internal and external networks. As such, understanding

    tourism’s relations to places and regions is a challenging task. The introduction to this

    special issue defines the editors’ goals of proposing that an evolutionary economic

    geography (EEG) approach can provide an insightful conceptual framework for

    understanding the relationship between tourism development and local and global

    economies. The first set of papers clearly outline and demonstrate the EEG

    perspective. The latter set of papers are not explicitly EEG oriented; however, the

    arguments and findings that the authors make have clear evolutionary theory

    implications. The special issue is intended to generate further research and dialog on

    the relations among tourism, development and place.

  • 27. Ioannides, Dimitri
    et al.
    Holcomb, Briavel
    Misguided policy initiatives in small-island destinations: Why do up-market tourism policies fail2003In: Tourism Geographies, ISSN 1461-6688, E-ISSN 1470-1340, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 39-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following the rhetoric of sustainability, many destinations have adopted policies aimed at attracting high spending visitors while limiting the further growth of mass package tourism. Drawing mainly from the experiences of small-island destinations, we question whether these policies are either environmentally or economically justifiable. Up-market tourists are few in number, prefer varied destinations and require luxury accommodations and facilities that are environmentally taxing and often foreign owned. Mass tourism, while certainly no panacea, has the advantages of larger markets, higher rates of repeat visitation, lower per capita rates of energy and natural resource use, and is often relatively spatially confined. Additionally, given the downturn in all travel following the September 11 2001 terrorist attacks, destinations are likely to welcome any paying guest.

  • 28. Ioannides, Dimitri
    et al.
    Ioannides, M Cohen
    Jewish past as a foreign country:: The travel experiences of american jews2004In: Tourism, diasporas and space: Travels to promised lands, London: Routledge, 2004Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 29. Ioannides, Dimitri
    et al.
    Ioannides, M Cohen
    “Pilgrimages of Nostalgia: Patterns of Jewish Travel in the US.”2002In: Tourism recreation research, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 17-25Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Leventis, Panos
    Hammons School of Architecture, Drury University, Springfield, MO, United States.
    Petridou, Evangelia
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Urban Resistance Tourism Initiatives in Stressed Cities: The Case of Athens2016In: Reinventing the Local in Tourism: Producing, Consuming, and Negotiating Place / [ed] Antonio Russo and Greg Richards, Bristol: Channel View Publications, 2016, p. 229-250Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    et al.
    Department of Geography, Geology, and Planning, Missouri State University, Springfield, USA .
    Nielsen, Per Åke
    Billing, Peter
    Transboundary Collaboration in Tourism: The case of the Bothnian Arc2006In: Tourism Geographies, ISSN 1461-6688, E-ISSN 1470-1340, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 122-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tourism's relationship to political boundaries has caught the attention of researchers only recently, even though on a more general level the academic study of borders attracts considerable interest. A topic that has been explored only superficially concerns the obstacles inhibiting tourism's development in a cross-border setting and, particularly, the tensions arising when the respective national interests of the two neighbouring countries do not coincide with the mutual benefits to be derived through close transfrontier collaboration at the regional level. An emerging key question is what forces dominate within the region straddling the border between two countries - those dictated by the respective national interests of each country, or those benefiting the transboundary region itself? These issues are explored through an examination of the Bothnian Arc Project, a cross-border collaborative effort between Sweden and Finland. A detailed investigation of the planning process that has been put into effect for developing and marketing this coastal region's tourist product is provided. Among the issues discussed are the attempts on the part of all stakeholders to establish a unifying identity for the region, which will set it aside from other destinations in northern Scandinavia (e.g. Lapland). The focus is on some of the most important challenges lying ahead in terms of developing and marketing this cross-border region as a single destination. Additionally, the investigation shows that even if the border in this region has effectively disappeared, obstacles remain to achieving mutual regional benefits.

  • 32. Ioannides, Dimitri
    et al.
    Petersen, T
    Challenges for tourism development within a restrictive planning environment: The case of a "cold water destination"2001In: Tourism, ISSN 1332-7461, Vol. 49, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33. Ioannides, Dimitri
    et al.
    Petersen, Tage
    Tourism "non-entrepreneurship" in peripheral destinations: A case sudy of small and medium tourism enterprises on Bornholm, Denmark2003In: Tourism Geographies, ISSN 1461-6688, E-ISSN 1470-1340, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 408-435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Geographers have increasingly criticized the absence of theoretical rigour characterizing ­studies of the tourism production system. Tourism entrepreneurship is one related research area that has not received the level of attention it deserves. Additionally, the role that innovation plays in small and medium tourism enterprises (SMTEs) has not been examined in depth. This paper focuses on a study of entrepreneurial activity among SMTEs in a peripheral region, namely the Danish island of Bornholm. The study is based on thirty in-depth, non-random, structured interviews with owners of tourism-related enterprises. An examination of the key characteristics of these SMTEs provides evidence that most can be described as 'gap-fillers', companies operated by so-called 'constrained' or 'non-entrepreneurs', which do not display evidence of having adopted significant product or process innovations. Among the key ­barriers to innovation identified are the extreme seasonality plaguing the island's tourist industry and, related to this, the uncompetitive nature of the existing tourist industry.

  • 34.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Petridou Daughtrey, Evangelia
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Competition in the travel distribution system: the US travel sector.2006In: Corporate Rivalry and Market Power / [ed] A. Papatheodorou, London: I.B. Tauris, 2006, p. 124-142Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Petridou, Evangelia
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Archipelagic Tourism: Synthesis and Reflections2015In: Archipelago Tourism: Policies and Practices / [ed] Godfrey Baldacchino, Aldershot: Ashgate, 2015, p. 241-248Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Petridou, Evangelia
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Contingent Neoliberalism and Urban Tourism in the United States2016In: Neoliberalism and the Political Economy of Tourism / [ed] Jan Mosedale, Routledge, 2016, p. 21-37Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Petridou, Evangelia
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Tourism workers and the equity dimension of sustainability2012In: Tourism Enterprises and the Sustainability Agenda across Europe / [ed] David Leslie, Farnham: Ashgate, 2012, p. 187-203Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Röslmaier, Michael
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    van der Zee, Egbert
    Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Airbnb as an instigator of ‘tourism bubble’ expansion in Utrecht's Lombok neighbourhood2018In: Tourism Geographies, ISSN 1461-6688, E-ISSN 1470-1340, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Airbnb phenomenon as part of the broader growth of the so-called collaborative economy has grabbed the attention of a growing number of tourism researchers. Among the topics explored have been investigations as to the spatial tendencies of Airbnb in cities and discussions concerning its effects, inter alia, on gentrification, over-touristification and eventual resident displacement. Recognizing that the majority of extant studies have been conducted either in major cities, which in their own right attract large numbers of visitors or in tourism-intensive smaller communities we chose to investigate what Airbnb growth means for a mid-sized city with a highly diversified economy, which is not yet over-touristified. Our focus was on the Dutch city of Utrecht. Through a geospatial and statistical analysis of AirDNA data, we explored the growth of Airbnbs in the city overall, focusing specifically on the phenomenon's effects on the Lombok neighbourhood, a nascent ‘neo-bohemia’ neighbouring the city-centre tourist bubble. Our analysis reveals that although Airbnb activity in this neighbourhood is relatively recent there are signs suggesting that further touristification of parts of Lombok has ignited increased Airbnb activity. Moreover, there is a distance decay of Airbnb activity as one moves away from the city centre and from established tourism services including restaurants. These findings suggest that in an emerging neo-bohemian space such as Lombok, Airbnb takes on a role as instigator of urban tourism bubble expansion. The study ends with a call for further investigations to better understand the implications expanded Airbnb activity has, among others, on social justice within cities. For example, future investigations could examine the manner in which Airbnbs influence the everyday life of the residents of urban spaces and investigate the conflicts that might arise in Airbnb ghettoes between visitors and locals. 

  • 39.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Timothy, Dallen
    Arizona State University.
    Tourism in the USA: A spatial  and social synthesis2010Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The United States continues to provide opportunities for travel and tourism to domestic and international travellers. This is the first book to offer students a comprehensive overview of both tourism and travel in this region, paying specific attention to the disciplines of Geography, Tourism Studies and, more generally, Social Science.

     

    Tourism in the USA explains the evolution of tourism paying attention to the forces that shaped the product that exists today. The focus of the book includes the manner in which tourism has played out in various contexts; the role of federal, state, and local policy is also examined in terms of the effects it has had on the US travel industry and on destinations. The various elements of tourism demand and supply are discussed and the influence that transportation (especially Americans’ high personal mobility rates and love affair with the auto) has had on the sector highlighted. The economics of tourism are fleshed out before focusing more narrowly on both the urban and rural settings where tourism occurs. A look into the manner in which the spatial structure of cities is transformed through tourism is also offered. Additionally, a brief examination of future issues in American tourism is presented along with explanations concerning the ascendancy of tourism as an economic development tool in various areas.

     

    The book combines theory and practice as well as integrating a range of useful student orientated resources to aid understanding and spur further debate, which can be used for independent study or in class exercises. These include:

     

     

    ‘Closer Look’ case studies with reflective questions to help show theory in practice and encourage critical thinking about tourism developments in this region

     

    ‘Discussion questions’ at the end of each chapter encourage stimulating debates

     

    ‘Further Reading’ sections direct the readers to related book and web resources so that they can learn more about the topics covered in each chapter.

    Table of Contents

    1. Introduction 2. American Tourism: A Study through Time 3. The Institutional Setting for Tourism in the United States 4. Demand for Tourism in the United States 5. Tourist Attractions, Tourism Types, Accommodations, and Intermediaries 6. The Transportation System 7. Tourism’s Economic Significance 8. Urban Tourism in the US 9. On the Road to Small Town USA: Rural Tourism and its Significance 10. Conclusions

  • 40.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Wall-Reinius, Sandra
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Sustainable mobility in the periphery: Are electric vehicles the answer?: Review of international literature on electric vehicles and ideas for further research2015Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 41.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Zampoukos, Kristina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Tourism's Labour Geographies: Bringing Tourism into Work and Work into Tourism2018In: Tourism Geographies, ISSN 1461-6688, E-ISSN 1470-1340, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Geographers have certainly contributed actively to the extant scholarly literature relating to tourism work and workers. Nevertheless, with few notable exceptions, most of this research has been piecemeal and case-based demonstrating unawareness of broader theoretical discussions and debates within the emerging sub-field of labour geography. For this special issue, a total of eight papers have been selected, most of which deal to varying degrees with labour mobilities, a theme that mainstream labour geographers themselves have largely avoided in the past. Additionally, the thorny issue of setting the intellectual boundaries between what constitutes work and leisure in contexts such as volunteer tourism is taken up in some of the discussions. Our aim with this special issue is to encourage the development of closer intellectual connections between labour geography and the study of tourism work and workers and their everyday mobilities. 

  • 42. Ioannides, M
    et al.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    Global Jewish tourism: Pilgrimages and remembrance2006In: Tourism, religion and spiritual journeys / [ed] D Timothy and D Olsen, London: Routledge, 2006, p. 156-171Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Olausson, Pär M.
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Petridou, Evangelia
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Seeking resilience through tourism in Greenland: A cautious outlook in the risky era of climate change2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the malaise associated with climate change, in Polar Regions (e.g., Greenland and Northern Canada) many have cautiously argued that the general upswing in ocean temperatures can be deemed positive because it presents the opportunity for introducing new economic activities. In the case of Greenland, Motzfeldt (quoted in Nutall 2008: 46) has argued that though hunting activities may be negatively affected because of ice melting in coastal region, conditions are favourable for activities such as fishing or tourism. Greenland itself constitutes an interesting case study of the effects of global climate change on polar regions given its increasing autonomy from Denmark (Home Rule), however, the issue that emerges is whether the present growth-oriented development path with its emphasis on extractive activities (e.g., aluminium and goal mining) in the island’s interior and tourism especially in coastal areas constitutes a knee-jerk reaction. Furthermore, is this part of a bouncing forward process (Davoudi, 2012) increasing community resilience, and if so, whose resilience is actually increased? In this paper we focus on the tourism sector though we recognize that parallel investigations should also be conducted relating to the mining and other related activities. Using an evolutionary economic geography (EEG) lens we argue that the tourism sector is being introduced as a substitute to traditional activities (e.g., fishing and hunting). However, in order to fully comprehend the dynamics of this strategy, it is important to pursue a relational approach recognizing, for instance, historic forces as well as the political/institutional context (Carson and Carson 2016). Effectively, the current growth rhetoric focuses overwhelmingly on exogenously-controlled interests (e.g., multinational tour operators and cruise companies) at the expense of indigenous businesses. Our argument is that though effectively what is happening in Greenland could be summarized as an adaptation to vulnerability imposed by climate change the overall resilience of a locally spun tourism sector is severely compromised by the current rhetoric.

  • 44.
    Petridou, Evangelia
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Conducting creativity in the periphery of Sweden: A bottom-up path towards territorial cohesion2013In: Creative Industries Journal, ISSN 1751-0694, E-ISSN 1751-0708, Vol. 5, no 1&2, p. 119-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Socio-economic cohesion has been a foundational overarching objective of the European Union. The European Union’s recent enlargement, not to mention the worldwide economic downturn, persisting asymmetries of globalization and deindustrialization have deepened existing cleavages and accentuated persisting effects of unbalanced development. The mainstreaming of the sustainability concept and the ascendance of creativity and innovation as regional development tools have caused municipalities and regions to explore ‘soft’ strategies aimed at fostering culture and creativity in order to revive their image and their economies. A shift in the thinking about cohesion policy after the publication of the Fifth Cohesion Report in November 2010 has signalled the need for European municipalities and regions to focus on bottom-up strategies so as to compliment top-down redistributional arrangements as paths towards regional development. This article focuses on the concept of territorial cohesion as spatial justice and its implications for the sparsely populated Swedish northern periphery. The aim of this study was to investigate the value of cultural industries (CIs) as a regional policy tool in the periphery in the context of justice, sustainability and the three dimensions of territorial cohesion: territorial identity, territorial efficiency and territorial quality. Findings suggest that viewing CIs as tools towards regional development in the periphery follows the tenets of (spatial) justice, sustainability and the dimensions of territorial cohesion.

  • 45.
    Petridou, Evangelia
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Creative serendipity: when art and public entrepreneurship revitalize a downtown2013In: Regioner, regionalism och entreprenörskap / [ed] Pär Olausson and Jon Nyhlén, Sundsvall: Mid Sweden University , 2013, p. 120-138Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Petridou, Evangelia
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Konstgödning: Co-producing art in the outskirts of the world2016Report (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Prince, Solene
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Contextualizing the complexities of managing alternative tourism at the community-level: A case study of a nordic eco-village2017In: Tourism Management, ISSN 0261-5177, E-ISSN 1879-3193, Vol. 60, no June, p. 348-356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To shed light on the complexities of fostering sustainability through alternative tourism, we explore the managerial contradictions and difficulties that arise as alternative tourism is developed in the name of sustainability at Sólheimar eco-village in Iceland. Following a focused ethnographic approach, we establish that those behind the management of volunteers, students and other guests regularly struggle to coordinate these respective groups in a manner that balances economic objectives with those relating to the environment and social equity. This is because limited human resources and strategic knowledge exist to fulfill all the host community’s goals through alternative tourism. The findings reveal the need to conceptualize alternative tourism as a forum for discussion between host and guest over the complexities of generating sustainable development.  This highlights the need for knowledge transmission over matters such as conflict resolution, critical reflection and cultural communication associated with the tourist experience at the community.

     

  • 48.
    Stoffelen, Arie
    et al.
    University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Vanneste, Dominique
    University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Obstacles to achieving cross-border tourism governance: A multi-scalar approach focusing on the German-Czech borderlands2017In: Annals of Tourism Research, ISSN 0160-7383, E-ISSN 1873-7722, Vol. 64, p. 126-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to identify distinctive obstacles to the establishment of tourism destination governance in both transnational and within-country borderlands. Analysis of the German-Czech borderlands, a region also incorporating within-country borders between three German federal states, indicates the multi-scalar and political contestations of cross-border tourism collaboration. Local tourism projects are generally successful, both on a transnational German-Czech level and between the German states of Bavaria, Saxony and Thuringia. However, structural cross-border destination management does not exist because of (transnational) multi-scalar institutional alignment problems and (internal) tourism-specific destination-level power contestations. Understanding destination management processes in borderlands, therefore, requires: (i) explicit multi-scalar analysis; (ii) recognition of both transnational and within-country contexts; (iii) more cross-pollination between tourism planning and cross-border governance research.

  • 49.
    Wall Reinius, Sandra
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Zampoukos, Kristina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    The trend towards all-inclusive and other pre-planned tourist destinations: Does geography matter?2011In: IV Critical Tourism Studies Conference / [ed] Morgan, N., Pritchard, A. & Ateljevic, I., Cardiff, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this explorative paper, the focus is on all-inclusive tourism developments, the latest outgrowth of a growing tendency over the decades to develop various types of planned tourism resorts in areas, which are often physically separated from existing communities. More and more of these planned enclave destinations are a direct outgrowth of the neoliberal global regime, which pits many countries and regions in a global place competition as they seek to attract foreign direct investment on a grand scale. Many of these all-inclusive resorts exist out of context of their surroundings and standardized global themes are reflected in characteristics like facility design and activities. Regardless of where these developments occur they do little to acknowledge local geographical contingencies. An overriding question within this paper relates to the role of place in contemporary tourism. Does this situation, then, reflect the fact that the geographical setting of the destination no longer matters? Is it true that in these destinations the activities on offer have replaced locational characteristics as a principal determinant of travel motivation? Among others the discussion focuses on the long-term implications of enclavic tourism, and on the forces and the key players behind their development.

  • 50.
    Wall-Reinius, Sandra
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Past, present and future transportation to peripheral recreational and protected areas in Sweden2013In: The Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting, AAG, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A long-term close relationship exists between national parks and tourism travel although goals, motives, needs, and attitudes shift through time. We discuss both completed and ongoing work analyzing tourist transportation to and within protected areas in the Swedish mountains by examining early access to national parks, changing tourist attitudes toward infrastructure and transportation, and future alternative transportation systems. A literature review shows tourism and railways were essential in establishing national parks in the early twentieth century, while similarities and differences were found between Sweden's park history and that of other countries. The themes of natural landscapes and wilderness remain common in environmental politics despite the onset of changes to meet other demands. Recent studies show increased importance of infrastructure and facilities for park visitors. Longitudinal data from protected areas in northern Sweden reveal that accessibility (trails, busses and flight connections) and facilities are increasingly important for back-country hikers. Furthermore, the study indicates growing acceptance of helicopter traffic and road construction even within protected areas themselves. Contemporary protected area and park policy are often encouraged to contribute to regional development; to attract tourists these areas face a challenge to meet the demand of easy access and high quality conveniences, and at the same time protect environmental values. We discuss possible implications of the changes found and future initiatives including more environment-friendly transportation practices to and within recreational and protected areas.

12 1 - 50 of 53
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