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  • 1.
    Ahlin, Karin
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Computer and System science.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Löfstedt, Ulrica
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Computer and System science.
    Mårtensson, Anna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Åslund, Anna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Öberg, Lena-Maria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Computer and System science.
    Projekt Kundanpassad teknikinformation – KATI: Slutrapport – med fokus på förslag på arbetssätt och metoder2014Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Ahlin, Karin
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Computer and System science.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Information management, Lean and efficiency:  are we focusing on the customer?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine what happens with the internal view an organisation has on information management when a holistic view is diminished into a blinkered view and the consequences it conveys for the customer. The customer consequences are divided into two parts – creation of external customers’ values and creation of value for the internal customer explored in terms of efficiency.

    Methodology/approach – Interviews with both outsourced co-workers and project leaders still in the organization.

    Findings – The organisations lack of listening to the external customer affects all three areas lifted in the analysis. The studied organisations have great opportunities for developing their process for producing TI, both regarding their mutual relationship as well as in regards to the external customer with the help of Lean and by applying a more holistic view on the production of Technical Information.

    Keywords – Information management, Lean, Customer value, Technical Information, Efficiency

    Paper type – Case study

  • 3.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Do Lean Leaders get healthy co-workers?2014In: 17th QMOD-ICQSS Conference, Prague, Czech Republic: Entering the Experience Economy – from product quality to experience quality / [ed] Su Mi Dahlgard-Park and Jens J. Dahlgaard, Lund: Lund University Library Press , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose was to examine the relationship between Lean values, Lean leadership and perceived co-worker health.Methodology/approach – A questionnaire used at a Swedish municipality that has been working with quality improvements for 20 years and with Lean for seven years was analyzed. More than 800 co-workers were asked to fill in the questionnaire which had been designed and earlier tested to measure the presence of a number of Lean values and Lean leadership as well as self-reported perceived health.Findings – The results show a medium positive relationship between Lean values, Lean leadership and the co-workers’ perception of their health. Customer focus presents the highest mean value, the lowest standard deviation and the highest correlation with co-worker health, which is interesting as the investigated organization is a municipality.

  • 4.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Exploring the relationship between Appreciative Inquiry, Lean and perceived co-worker health2015In: Creating a Sustaniable future through Quality: on Quality and Service Sciences ICQSS 2015, October 12-14, Lund: Lund University Library Press , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many Quality Management approaches, such as Lean, are deficit-based and focus on problems and how to overcome them and another way to approach this could be to focus on possibilities.  When focusing on problems instead of possibilities, organizations are prevented from using their full potential which leads to decreased organizational capacity. Appreciative Inquiry is, in contrast to a deficit-based approach, a positive approach to change. The problems should not be ignored but, by focusing on strengths, this approach could be more effective when it comes to promoting better workplace health. 

    Earlier research has examined if Lean values affect co-workers’ perceived health and found a connection. Even though the relationships between co-workers’ perceived health and Lean leadership and also Lean values were not very strong, they are all positively correlated. What happens however if we introduce Appreciative Inquiry to see in what way it links to Lean values and co-worker perceived health?

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore if and how Appreciative Inquiry correlates with Lean values and co-workers’ perceived health.

    Methodology/approach – To investigate the relationship between Lean, Appreciative Inquiry and perceived co-worker health, a questionnaire was developed based on two previously tested questionnaires.  The new questionnaire was filled in by 841 co-workers at a Swedish municipality and was then analysed to explore in what way Appreciative Inquiry correlates with a number of Lean values as well as perceived co-worker health.

    Findings – All variables were found to be significantly correlated with the variable ‘Appreciative Inquiry’. The variable ‘Continuous improvements’ relates most to ‘Appreciative Inquiry’ followed by ‘Eliminating Waste’ as those variables can be considered to have a large positive relationship. ‘Supportive Leadership’ and ‘System view’ have a medium positive relation to ‘Appreciative Inquiry’ and the variables ‘Health’ and ‘Customer focus’ have a small relation to Appreciative Inquiry in this context.  

    Keywords Supportive leadership, Lean values, co-worker health, Appreciative Inquiry

    Paper type Case study

  • 5.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Is there a relationship between Lean Leaders and healthy co-workers?2015In: Quality Innovation Prosperity, ISSN 1335-1745, E-ISSN 1338-984X, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 123-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to examine the relationship between Lean values, Lean leadership and perceived co-worker health both from an empirical and theoretical perspective. Methodology/Approach: A questionnaire used at a Swedish municipality that has been working with quality improvements for 20 years and with Lean for seven years was analyzed. 841 co-workers answered the questionnaire which had been designed and pre-tested to measure the presence of a number of Lean values and Lean leadership as well as self-reported perceived health.  Findings: The results show a moderately positive relationship between Lean values, Lean leadership and co-workers’ perceptions of their health. Customer focus presents the highest mean value, the lowest standard deviation and the highest correlation with co-worker health, which is interesting as the investigated organization is a municipality.

  • 6.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Measuring Appreciative Inquiry, Lean and Perceived Co-worker Health2016In: Quality Innovation Prosperity, ISSN 1335-1745, E-ISSN 1338-984X, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 105-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present a developed questionnaire which measure Appreciative Inquiry, Lean values and co-workers health. The purpose is also to explore if and how Appreciative Inquiry correlates with Lean values and co-workers’ perceived health in an organisation working with Lean. Methodology/Approach: To investigate the relationship between Lean, Appreciative Inquiry and perceived co-worker health, a questionnaire was developed based on two previously tested questionnaires. The new questionnaire was answered by 841 co-workers at a Swedish municipality and was then analysed to explore in what way Appreciative Inquiry correlates with a numberof Lean values as well as perceived co-worker health. Findings: All variables were found to be significantly correlated with the variable ‘Appreciative Inquiry’. The variable ‘Continuous improvements’ relates most to ‘Appreciative Inquiry’ followed by ‘Eliminating Waste’ as those variables can be considered to have a large positive relationship. ‘Supportive Leadership’ and ‘System view’ have a medium positive relation to ‘Appreciative Inquiry’ and the variables ‘Health’ and ‘Customer focus’ have a small relation to Appreciative Inquiry in this context.

  • 7.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Johansson, Catrin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Health Related Quality Management Values and Key Principles of Communicative Leadership - Are They the Same?2014In: Quality Innovation Prosperity, ISSN 1335-1745, E-ISSN 1338-984X, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 59-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to compare health related values within Quality Management with Key Principles of Communicative Leadership in order to see if Communicative leaders also promote healthy co-workers.  A literature review was conducted within the area of Communicative Leadership and within the values of health related Quality Management. The principles within Communicative leadership were compared with the underlying dimensions within the health related values ‘Leadership Commitment’ and Participation of everybody’. The analysis shows that the underlying dimensions within both of the health related Quality Management values ‘Participation of everybody’ and ‘Leadership commitment’ were related to some of the Key Principles of Communicative Leadership. The results can help Communicative Leaders to emphasize the Key Principles that also promote healthy co-workers. The results can also help leaders that already have healthy co-workers to increase leaders’ communication competence within organizations.

  • 8.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Johansson, Catrin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Health Related Quality Management values and Key principles of Communicative Leadership - are they the same?2013In: 16th QMOD conference on Quality and Service Sciences ICQSS,4-6 September 2013, Portoroz, Slovenia: From LearnAbility and InnovAbility to SustainAbility / [ed] Dahlgaard-Park, Su Mi, 2013, p. 164-177Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to compare health related values within Quality Management with Key Principles of Communicative Leadership in order to see if Communicative leaders also promote healthy co-workers.

    Methodology/approach – A literature review was conducted within the area of Communicative Leadership and within the values of health related Quality Management. The principles within Communicative leadership were compared with the underlying dimensions within the health related values ‘Leadership Commitment’ and Participation of everybody’.

    Findings – The analysis shows that the underlying dimensions within both of the health related Quality Management values ‘Participation of everybody’ and ‘Leadership commitment’ were related to some of the Key Principles of Communicative Leadership. Practical implications – The results can help Communicative Leaders to emphasize the Key Principles that also promote healthy co-workers. The results can also help leaders that already have healthy co-workers to increase leaders’ communication competence within organizations.

  • 9.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Johansson, Catrin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    How Communicative Leadership influences co-workers’ health: A Quality Management perspective2016In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 143-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to describe leaders’ views on how Communicative Leadership influences co-worker health by comparing their opinions with the health-related values within Quality Management.

    Design/methodology/approach - A multinational manufacturing organization that has been working with Communicative Leadership for several years was investigated. 21 managers trained in Communicative Leadership were interviewed and asked about their views on how their communication influences both the well-being of their co-workers and the working environment. Various communication behaviors and communication methodologies emerged from the interviews and were then analyzed versus the health-related Quality Management dimensions.

    Findings - The result shows concrete communication behavior and methodologies that influence co-worker well-being and the working environment positively and negatively. Another result is a description of the prerequisites for managers to be able to communicate in a way that influences co-worker well-being and the working environment. The analysis of the communication behaviors and communication methodologies versus the health-related Quality Management values shows that several of the health-related Quality Management dimensions were present.

    Research limitations/implications – A limitation of this research is that it is just managers’ view that has been investigated and analyzed.

    Practical implications – Managers acting and behaving in accordance with the communicative behaviors and methodologies described in the results can influence co-worker health and the working environment in a positive way. The level of awareness of the prerequisites could help managers to influence co-worker well-being and create a good working environment.

    Originality/value – The connection between Communicative Leadership and health-related Quality Management values is rarely made. This research can contribute to greater understanding in both areas.

    Keywords Health-related Quality Management, co-worker health, Communicative Leadership, well-being, working environment.

    Paper type Research paper. 

  • 10.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Löfstedt, Ulrica
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Computer and System science.
    Mårtensson, Anna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Öberg, Lena-Maria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Computer and System science.
    Projekt Kundanpassad teknikinformation – KATI: Kvalitetsarbete inom teknikinformation – Goda exempel och utvecklingsbehov2014Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Snyder, Kristen
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Enhancing Sustainable Quality Culture2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2015, a project was initiated to explore how quality can be enhanced in Swedish businesses by developing an internal coaching process to support value-based leadership development. The three–year project, financed by The Knowledge Foundation, is a research and development partnership consisting of three Swedish manufacturing companies and Mid Sweden University. Results presented in the poster address both the process and outcomes from this project.

    Purpose

    To present the results in changes in a company's value-base two years into a project with the purpose to explore how quality can be enhanced when a value-based leadership is integrated with sustainable practices.

    Method:

    A number of activities were completed in the company. A survey was designed to measure SQD values as an indicator for value based leadership. The survey were administered both at the start of the project and then again one year later to measure changes in leadership and values. The results from the survey were first analyzed using SPSS (Cronbach Alpha and T-test) and then in relation to completed activities. This was done by the research team together with management team in the company.

    Results:

    The results will be the presentation of completed activities within the company as well as results from the two measurements shows that the mean of the measured values are higher in the second measurement when it comes to the whole factory. When it comes to the managers it is the opposite regarding how they look at their role when it comes to the values: Leadership commitment and Participation of everybody.

    Conclusions so far:

    • Measuring soft aspects helps to focus on culture and values.
    • The wording of the statements can affect culture.
    • Talking about leadership in connection to an organizations unique context initiates new dialog forms, topics, and gives the leaders a “leadership language”.
    • Focusing on positive aspects of leadership creates energy and a solution focused climate.
    • Statistically significant results can be shown after such a short period as one year.
    • Increased pride in the team and the work-place!
    • Further investigate correlations between factors. 
  • 12.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Snyder, Kristen
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Hedlund, Christer
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Capturing Value-based leadership in Practice:: Insights from developing and applying an AI-interview guide2017In: Challenges and Opportunities of Quality in the 4th Industrial Revolution: On quality and service sciences ICQSS 2017 / [ed] Dahlgaard-Park, Su Mi and Dahlgaard, Jens J., 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    One of the most critical aspects for building quality and innovation in organizations is the role of values. Performance suffers when organizations fail to prioritize values. A challenge for many leaders is to understand deep-rooted values together with what they are and how they are developed. These deep-rooted values are reflected in the behaviors, language and signs occurring in the organization and can be seen as the organizations culture. When a culture is shaped, leadership is central and the managers in the organization are vital. Managers in an organization affect the predominating culture through their behaviors and approach to their co-workers. This make it interesting to try to find out underlying values held by managers striving for good leadership and performance. Underlying values can be unconscious and taken for granted, and thereby hard to ask about.  By using an interview guide inspired by Appreciative Inquiry (AI) (an approach based on generativity and positivity), underlying values and the leadership used by top managers can be discovered.

     

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to present and discuss the results from the Appreciative Inquiry (AI) inspired interviews to explore the underlying values held by top manager and to identify soft aspects of leadership.

     

    Methodology/approach – Top managers were interviewed as a part of a research project with the aim to support the development of value-based leadership that integrates company values, organizational culture, customer needs and sustainable development. A structured interview guide, inspired by AI, was developed and used to pinpoint their motivation and vision of a good organization in order to understand the values the leaders had and to identify soft aspects of leadership.  The interviews were analyzed in workshops with the whole research group and structured and visualized through affinity chart.

     

    Findings – The results show underlying values held by top managers and identified soft aspects of leadership.

     

    Practical implications – The presented interview guide can be used to identify the top managers underlying values and the presented results from the interviews can be used to inspire other leaders to develop their leadership in their striving of good leadership and effective organizations.

  • 13.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Snyder, Kristen
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Hedlund, Christer
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Collection of baseline data – expanding the scope2016In: EurOMA 2016 - Interactions, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For leaders to successfully meet the complexity of businesses today, many argue the need to design a performance measurement system that integrates hard data outcomes with soft measures found in organizational culture including values, norms, and behaviors. The purpose of this paper is to present an approach to collecting baseline data that captures the soft dimensions of organizational culture with system thinking as a guiding theory. The results present an approach for measuring the soft dimensions of organizational culture with description of methods, the type of data and what level of organizational culture they measure.

  • 14.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Wiklund, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Learning from chaos : a necessity for adapting quality management to the future?2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the core leadership behavior in Change Oriented Leadership, the KaosPilots and Deming´s 14 points. Furthermore we aim to compare similarities and differences in these leadership behaviors, in order to propose new leadership behaviors within Quality Management to fit tomorrow´s more creativity based organizations. Methodology The research has been conducted through describing and comparing core leadership behaviors, in Change Oriented Leadership, KaosPilots and Deming´s 14-points. Findings Our comparison indicates that there are behaviors in the Change Oriented Leadership that are missing in Quality Management and probably would benefit organizations if they were adopted. The leadership that the KaosPilots addresses is different from the leadership in Quality Management in many ways but probably necessary to learn from to meet new demands from the customers and the co-workers. Originality/value Leadership within Quality Management developed with innovation and entrepreneurship from Change Oriented Leadership complimented with playfulness and chaos from the KaosPilots would most likely generate a more creative environment and thereby create more competitive organizations.

  • 15.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Wiklund, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Learning from others to adapt Quality Management to the future2011In: Total Quality Management and Business Excellence, ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 187-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to compare leadership behaviours from two different approaches with the leadership behaviours within Quality Management in order to find possible areas for developing leadership within Quality Management. A case study has been carried out at a Swedish award-winning organisation in order to study leadership behaviours. In-depth interviews have been carried out with the intention to explore how the manager has worked to become one of Sweden’s best workplaces. Leadership behaviours from three different approaches are summarised in ‘The Core Leadership Behaviours’. The analysis of the leadership methodologies and behaviours used by the leaders and the ‘Core Leadership Behaviours’ from the three different approaches has been summarized for each approach. The comparison indicates that there are interesting leadership behaviours in Change Oriented Leadership as well as in KaosPilots that are not established within Quality Management. The leadership behaviours could complement Quality Management to meet new and challenging demands from customers and co-workers

  • 16.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Wiklund, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Measuring the Starting Points for a Lean Journey2012In: 15 th QMOD conference: From LearnAbility and InnovAbility to SustainAbility / [ed] Su Mi Dahlgaard-Park, Jens J. Dahlgaard & Adam Hamrol, Poznan: Agence Reklamova Comprint , 2012, p. 146-156Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Purpose –

    The purpose of this paper is to emphasize the importance of measuring the starting

    point of improvement work focusing on soft values and to present one way of measuring the

    starting point of a Lean implementation. The purpose is also to describe the Lean

    implementation planned within a municipal division and also to present their measured

    starting conditions.

    Methodology/approach –

    A literature study, with Lean implementation, measuring starting

    points for improvement work, soft values and the effects of the improvement work in focus

    has been carried out. Documents from the planned Lean implementation within a municipal

    division have been studied. To measure the conditions for the implementation a previously

    conducted measurement approach that measured health-related Quality Management was used.

    Findings –

    The paper contains an argument for the importance of measuring the effect of a

    Lean implementation with a focus on soft values and measuring starting points. A description

    of one planned Lean implementation within a municipal division and their starting conditions

    are presented.

    Practical implications –

    To measure the conditions at the starting point of a Lean

    implementation gives managers information to help them focus on important improvement

    areas. A description of a Lean implementation can help other organizations to plan their

    implementation.

  • 17.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Wreder, Åsa
    Achieving Sustaniable Health Among Co-workers: A case study at FöreningsSparbanken2005Report (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Eriksson, Maria
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Åslund, Anna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering. Strömsunds Kommun.
    Measuring customer value in commercial experiences2018In: Total quality management and business excellence (Online), ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 29, no 5-6, p. 618-632Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Customer value is of importance to all businesses in the search for competitive advantage. To learn about what customers truly appreciate, measuring can be a vital source of information towards an understanding of what creates customer value. Commercial experiences are claimed to be an offering of their own, separate from goods and services. The existing tools and models for measuring customer value do not focus on the elements pointed out as vital for commercial experiences. A case study was performed on customers participating in a high-impact commercial experience to understand what is valuable to the customer. The results were used todevelop an approach to measuring customer value specifically for commercial experiences. In the study, questionnaires were designed to find out about custom erexpectations before the experience compared with customer satisfaction after theexperience in search for important factors of customer value. The study achieved a high score indicating a high level of received customer value, reinforcing the selected measurement variables. The approach proposes the development of a measuring tool consisting of 22 elements along with the WOW-impact specificallyadapted for measuring customer value in commercial experiences. This is one way of expressing the created experiential quality.

  • 19.
    Eriksson, Maria
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Building an organizational culture when delivering commercial experiences – the leaders’ perspective2016In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 229-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to identify, present and analyze the strengths and weaknesses mentioned by leaders when describing how their organization works with creating customer value in commercial experiences. Furthermore, the overall research purpose is to explore the creation of customer value in commercial experiences.

    Design/methodology/approach – An interview study with eight managers focused on how their organization creates customer value when offering commercial experiences. Results were analyzed with regard to creating customer value, customer involvement and development of new experiences.

    Findings – A literature study confirms an increasing interest in commercial experiences both financially and because of customer demand. The conducted interview study found several areas of improvement where the greatest potential was in the building of a strong organizational culture based on values to ensure co-creation of customer value between the organization and the customer. Also found to be important were working with customer involvement when co-producing the experience,discovering customer expectations and measuring the results of the delivered customer value.

    Originality/value – When it comes to commercial experiences, one of the keys to creating customer value is the element of surprise and delivering the unexpected. This advocates studying the theory of attractive quality, discovering the unspoken needs of the customer.

  • 20.
    Eriksson, Maria
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Achieving shared values: Learning from Disney2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The need to achieve a strong corporate culture is one of the key questions within Total Quality Management (TQM). TQM is generally considered to be based on a number of core values; such as customer focus, decisions based on facts, process orientation, continuous improvement, everybody’s commitment and leadership, (Hellsten & Klefsjö, 2000). The core values should ideally be conformed to by all employees within a TQM organization, (ibid). Achieving these core values seems to be rewarding. Many companies that have succeeded in adapting their core values have received quality awards, e.g. Malcolm Baldridge National Quality Award and EFQM Excellence Model. These quality awards are based on values that are widely considered to be the building blocks of effective TQM implementation (Hendricks & Singhal, 1999). There are a lot of descriptions in literature about the importance of working with the ideas of TQM such as putting focus on the customer, establishing processes and also about educating the employees in using tools of improvement, but very little focus on discussing how shared values really are achieved.   A common set of values within an organization is often referred to as the company or corporate culture. A strong culture implies that there is uniformity among the employees regarding, for example values (Pinder 1998). In our literature studies we came across two interesting strategies that combined together provide a tactic for working with shared values to attain a strong corporate culture. According to Chatman (1989) the best way is an integration of the strategies of selection and socialization. That implies both considering values at the selection when the organization chooses its members, by recruiting an individual with the right values and later on by maintaining or reinforcing values by socialization which can be done by training, orientation and other methods. As regards working with achieving TQM values we mostly encountered the use of socialization and feel that there is a need for broader thinking by putting greater emphasis on the selection process when recruiting new members into the organization.   The purpose of this paper is to raise the discussion about how to achieve homogeneity of values, such as TQM values in order to be a successful organization. The presented theories are accompanied by an observation from the renowned Walt Disney World in Florida, providing an example of how they are working with the selection strategy.

  • 21.
    Hedlund, Christer
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Snyder, Kristen
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics. Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Continuous Improvement of Leadership: Evaluation of peer-coaching experiments2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates continuous improvement of leadership with the aid of coaching and specifically peer-coaching as a model for leadership improvement. The paper is based on the idea of experimental learning both as a tool to motivate, educate and inspire leaders in two studied organizations. Learning-by-doing along with reflection has formed the basis for leadership improvement and leadership awareness in this study. The concept of Developing- by-doing have been used to help leaders design the foundation of an organizational specific coaching model. 

  • 22.
    Hedlund, Christer
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Snyder, Kristen
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Research On Toyota Kata? Proposing A Future Research Agenda For The Emerging Practice2016In: EurOMA Conference Proceedings: Interactions 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the bestselling book “Toyota Kata” was first published in 2009 the practices of the Toyota Kata has spread quickly among practitioners and consultants all over the world. However, the number of academic papers and studies concerning Toyota Kata occurs as remarkably sparse. Based on the apparent gap, this paper identifies and proposes a future research agenda on Toyota Kata based on a survey with Swedish Toyota Kata experts. As a result, 20 areas are highlighted and identified as the currently most desirable to understand and study more closely. Based on the areas, six themes are also identified and formulated. 

  • 23.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Creating a Quality Management Culture: Focusing on Values and Leadership2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    When applied successfully, the QM initiatives TQM and Lean enhance an organization´s ability to meet and exceed the expectations of the customers as well as co-workers and other stakeholders. There are however also QM initiatives that fail and one reason for this is the organization’s inability to create a supportive culture, a culture that rests on a number of values which aim at improving the quality and thereby customer satisfaction. Even though this is known by both practitioners and researchers, little has been written on how to achieve a QM culture in practice and there are not many methodologies and tools designed directly with purpose of creating this culture. In addition, the measurements used for monitoring organizational success focus mainly on ‘hard’ process or financial measures such as lead-time reduction and operating income.  

    The purpose of this thesis has been to ‘examine how a strong organizational culture can be created and to contribute with knowledge about how to create and measure a QM culture’. To fulfill this purpose, a number of case studies have been carried out and a questionnaire has been developed in order to measure the presence and importance of a number of QM values.

    The research presented in this thesis reinforces the fact that culture is an important factor to take into account when applying QM initiatives. A structured way of working with culture and the development of a strategy on how the culture in the organization will be changed is needed. This in combination with methodologies and tools aiming directly at enhancing a QM culture. The research also shows that the relationship between organizational culture, values and behaviors needs to be considered when working to create a strong QM culture. Most of the methodologies and tools found in the case studies aim directly at reinforcing the ‘right’ behaviors in the organization, hence enhancing the underlying values. For instance, the way an organization works with selection, e.g. recruitment and promotion, based on behaviors rather than documented merits is one methodology found in the research. The leadership was found to be important when it came to building or strengthening the culture. Managers are considered key players and need to act as role models, displaying the desired behaviors themselves. The managers need to be present among their co-workers and aware of how their own actions affect the possibility to build a strong QM culture.

    Another conclusion drawn is the need to measure the ‘softer’ side of QM. One starting point when applying a QM initiative should be the assessment of the existing culture in the organization as a complement to the ‘harder’ measures. The research presented in this thesis suggests that the questionnaire that has been developed could be an appropriate tool for this purpose. If the existing culture in an organization does not support the values within QM, the behaviors of managers and co-workers that are needed to improve quality and thereby customer satisfaction could be hard to achieve.

  • 24.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    How to create a commercial experience: Focus on Leadership, Values and Organizational Culture2009Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A new kind of commercial offer is on the rise, that of a commercial experience. It is said to be the next progression of value after a service and that it is distinct from a service in several ways, two important being a) the provider having to create something new or memorable to the customer, i.e. creating attractive quality, and b) the offer being a co-creation between the customer and the provider.

    Little has been written though about how creating a commercial experience can affect the way organizations should work. One of the areas that ought to be affected is the way organizations work to shape and coordinate co-workers and leaders behaviors by having a common set of values, or in other words a strong organizational culture.  A number of studies show that the leaders in an organization have a strong influence on its culture while others show that working with Total Quality Management (TQM) can enhance the corporate values and lead to profitable organizations.

    The purpose of this thesis was to explore and contribute knowledge about how to create a commercial experience. The more specific purpose was to explore this area in relation to leadership, values, organizational culture and TQM.

    To fulfill these purposes two case studies were carried out with the intention of finding ways of working. The first focused on how a renowned organization that offers commercial experiences works and the second on organizations offering commercial experiences in the region of Jämtland.

    One conclusion drawn from the research is that methodologies and tools that aim directly to enhance the organization´s values and hence its culture might be of even more importance in organizations offering a commercial experience. It seems to be important to be aware that values need to be translated into behaviors to make them understandable in the organization. Storytelling is one tool that can be used as an enhancer of organizational culture, a tool that might be a fairly unrecognized for this purpose. It is also evident that the leadership practiced within the organization is crucial if a strong organizational culture is to be achieved.

    Further, strategies for selecting the right values appear to be important when trying to create a strong organizational culture - a strategy not so evident within TQM. This could be one area where TQM needs to be developed in order to support the creation of a commercial experience but also to implement TQM more effectively.

  • 25.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Monitoring co-worker health and Lean culture development2016In: Proceedings of the 19th QMOD Conference, 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to present and discuss results from a survey designed to measure baseline data in a project with the aim to support the development of value-based leadership that integrates company values, organizational culture, customer needs and sustainable development.

    Methodology/approach – As part of a research project’s base line data collection, a survey designed to measure Leadership commitment, Participation of everybody, Lean values and Perceived co-worker health was developed and tested. The results were analyzed in order to meet each company’s specific need for developing their leadership and culture.

    Findings – The results show a difference between the two examined companies, both when it comes to mean values and correlations between the measured factors. The results also indicate the importance of analyzing the results from surveys more in depth and together with other ways of examining culture in order to gain a better understanding of the company’s unique culture and leadership.

    Practical implications – The presented survey and way of analyzing the results can help organizations in understanding their own unique needs when working to create a Lean culture as well as healthy co-workers in order to attain sustainable development.

  • 26.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    The need for a long-term mindset when measuring the effects of lean on health-related quality management values: A case study from the public sector2017In: International Journal of Workplace Health Management, ISSN 1753-8351, E-ISSN 1753-836X, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 249-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects a lean initiative has on the health-related quality management (QM) values, “Leadership Commitment” and “Participation of Everybody,” as well as on perceived co-worker health in the public sector.

    Design/methodology/approach – A case study was carried out at a municipal division that had been working with lean for approximately 18 months. A questionnaire was used to measure the effect on health-related QM values both before and after the initial 18 month period. Documents from the intended lean implementation were studied at the starting point and after 18 months; this was followed up by examining new documents. The results from the questionnaires were analyzed using SPSS and the documents were analyzed by means of document comparisons and consensus discussion in the research group.

    Findings – The effects on the health-related QM values; “Leadership Commitment” and “Participation of everybody” in this study showed that the values still permeated the organization to a relatively high extent after 18 months but that no statistical differences can be shown between the two measurement points. When measuring what effects a lean initiative has on values, a period of 18 months might be too short, if significance changes are expected. None the less, the results can be a way of monitoring the development of these softer values. Something that is equally important is to see if there have been any major changes, as a way of keeping the work with building a new culture alive and in focus. The results strengthen the assumption that a long-term mindset is needed when QM initiatives such as lean are applied within an organization especially when changes to values and workplaces are expected.

    Originality/value – This study has further explored the QM in relation to lean in the respect of how the QM values “Leadership commitment” and “Participation of Everybody” are effected by a lean initiative.

  • 27.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Snyder, Kristen
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Strengthening quality culture in private sector and health care: What can we learn from applying soft measures?2018In: Leadership in Health Services, ISSN 1751-1879, E-ISSN 1751-1887, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 276-292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this study is to present a comprehensive approach to studying organizational culture using “soft measures” to facilitate sustainable quality development in organizations. The purpose is also to present, discuss and compare the results from a survey designed to measure a company’s value base.

    Design/methodology/approach – A number of different methods were used to collect soft data to study and measure organizational culture and at the same time influence the culture and the leadership within three organizations. One method, the survey, was used on two different occasions to obtain an overview of the culture within an organization and to investigate if the activities had influenced the culture and the leadership.

    Findings – The application of soft measures used by leaders to study and develop organizational culture resulted in statistically significant positive changes in organizational work culture, according to a pre-post survey after a short period of one year.

    Practical implications – The approach can be used by leaders in different types of organizations as the challenge of changing the organizational culture through the leadership seems to be a common challenge regardless of line of business.

    Originality/value – The study shows the benefits of using a comprehensive approach to assess an organization’s culture based on qualitative measures and analysis.

  • 28.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Snyder, Kristen
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Hedlund, Christer
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Using the employee satisfaction survey as a tool for building organizational culture2016In: EurOMA Conference Proceedings: Interactions, 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a strong relationship between employee satisfaction and organizational results and using an employee surveys effectively could support quality improvements and organizational culture. The purpose of this paper is to present an employee satisfaction survey designed to change organizational culture and co-worker behaviors. Included in the analysis are results from that survey focusing on culture and leadership. The results show that asking a different kind of questions in an employee satisfaction survey and analyzing the results in more detail could give an organization a management tool to be used both to monitor and to build organizational culture.

  • 29.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Snyder, Kristen
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Hedlund, Christer
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Truly changing the culture – learnings from a value-based top leader2017In: 20th QMOD conference: Challenges and Opportunities of Quality in the 4th Industrial Revolution / [ed] Su Mi Dahlgaard Park, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Both TQM and Lean are said to rest on a number of values that in turn are said to be the building blocks of the organizational culture needed to successfully apply TQM or Lean in an organization. The reason why applying Lean or TQM fail is frequently explained by the lack of focusing on values and culture and instead too big focus on tools and methods. In this context, leadership is often mentioned as one if the main keys to change the organizational culture as the leaders in organizations are the bearer of values. There is also a strong connection between values held and behaviors shown by the leaders and the co-workers in the organization. So the question arises; how come it´s so hard to make the change in leadership behaviors and by that the organizational culture? At the same time, there are leaders succeeding with consciously changing the culture and the values held by the co-workers. What can we learn from such a leaders that have succeeded in changing an exciting culture in an organization?

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to present the values held by and the ways of working used by a top leader (COO) with the aim to change the organizational culture.

    Methodology/approach – The Chief Operating Officer (COO) of a successful Lean company was interviewed in order to identify the managers´ values as well as ways of working. A developed interview guide was used to get an understanding of the values the leader had and to identify “other” softer aspects of his leadership. The results from the study was analyzed by the researchers, first by each researcher individually, then in workshops as a group.

    Findings – The results show that the COO appears to have an understanding about the connection between values and behaviors something shown by the close connection between the identified ways of working and values. The result also shows ways of working to achieve a cultural change, were the use of ROFO can be seen as a driving force for this. The COO displays a leadership and a value-base much in line with Lean leadership and value-base.Practical implications – The presented results can be used by leaders in different types of organization in their work with developing the culture and leadership.

  • 30.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    WIklund, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Measuring the soft sides of TQM and Lean2010In: 13th QMOD Conference, 31 Aug – 1 Sept 2010 Cottbus, Germany, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposeThe purpose of this paper was to examine TQM and Lean in regards to values and principles, implementation problems and measurements for success. The purpose was also to present an approach to measure organizational culture and values as a part of the implementation strategy for TQM and Lean.

    Methodology/ApproachLiterature studies were conducted to examine TQM and Lean regarding values and principles, implementation problems and measurements of success. With the literature study as a base a questionnaire with statements about the main principles of Lean was developed to further evolve an existing survey used to measure the values ‘Leadership commitment’ and ‘Participation of everybody’.

    FindingsThe literature study showed similar problems when implementing Lean and TQM but even though they are said to originate from the same roots it was found that there are some areas within Lean that are not quite so apparent in TQM. Based on the findings the already exciting measurement was extended with these principles with the purpose to create an approach to measure organizational culture.

    Value of PaperA measurement approach can help managers to measure to what extent the values and principles of TQM and Lean are present within an organization, a prerequisite for achieving world-class quality.

  • 31.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Eriksson, Maria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Can selecting the right values help TQM implementation?: A case study about organisational homogeneity at the Walt Disney Company2012In: Total Quality Management and Business Excellence, ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Total Quality Management, TQM, is often referred to as a value based management philosophy, built on a set of core values. These TQM values should ideally be conformed to by all employees in order to achieve a thriving organisation. A strong organisational culture with shared core values can therefore be identified as of importance for a successful TQM implementation. This paper discusses how organisations need to act in order to achieve shared values among co-workers. In the theory two strategies appear: to select people who appear to possess the desired values in the first place and to socialize employees once hired. When working with TQM, several examples of socialization can be found in described techniques and tools, however the selection strategy seems to be both unapplied and underestimated. In order to find empirical examples a case study was conducted at an organisation which is renowned for the way in which they work with values. A conclusion of this paper is that, as a complement to the use of socialization, a selection strategy is proposed in order to achieve shared values in order to facilitate TQM implementation.

  • 32.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Kahm, Therese
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Lean from the first-line managers’ perspective – assuredness about the effects of Lean as a driving force for sustainable change2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Purpose: The purpose of this article is to present the results from a survey concerning first-line managers’ assuredness about the effects of Lean after two years of Lean application in a Swedish healthcare organization. The purpose is also to reflect about assuredness as a driving force for sustainable change.

    Methodology/Approach: Questionnaires were sent to all first-line managers in a healthcare organization in order to investigate how these managers consider their role, ability and conditions to create change according to Lean. The questionnaire included a question with 16 statements about how assured these managers were about the effects of Lean that will be presented in this paper. 

    Findings: The study showed that the majority of the first-line managers in this particular healthcare organization were assured that developmental work supported by Lean contributes to a higher patient focus, supports first-line managers with useful tools and methods, contributes to the development of an improvement culture and that the Lean concept in general is a support in improvement work.

    Practical implications: The question can either be used separately or as a part of an entire questionnaire in healthcare organizations. Asking first-line managers about their assuredness about the effects of Lean on a regular basis is one way suggested to follow the Lean process from their perspective. The survey question might encourage discussions about the process of Lean and hopefully contribute to a greater understanding about the importance of assuredness and about the desired effects when applying Lean.

    Category: Case study

  • 33.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Löfstedt, Ulrika
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Computer and System science.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Öberg, Lena-Maria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Computer and System science.
    Taking a Holistic Perspective on Technical Communication and Lean2015In: Quality Innovation Prosperity, ISSN 1335-1745, E-ISSN 1338-984X, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 103-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present best practices and areas of improvement in Technical Communication (TC) analyzed with Lean values as a base. The purpose is also to analyze the results from a holistic perspective using the Synergy-4 model, a multi-perspective approach which considers four different spheres of an organization at a time in order to discover synergies.

    Methodology/Approach: To fulfill the purpose, 15 interviews in four different companies were conducted. These were then analyzed and the results were categorized into a number of predefined Lean areas. The results from the Lean values were then further analyzed with the Synergy-4 model as a base.

    Findings: Taking a Lean perspective could enhance the status of TC with regard to finding ways to incorporate the customer’s voice more clearly when it comes to strengthening the role of TC. The result from the analyses indicates that Lean and Synergy-4 can enrich each other.

  • 34.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Mårtensson, Anna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Measuring the importance and practices of Lean values2014In: The TQM Journal, ISSN 1754-2731, E-ISSN 1754-274X, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 463-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to present the result from a study carried out at an organization, which has recently started applying Lean, to examine changes in the importance and presence of Lean values within the organization in relation to when different parts of the organization started to apply Lean.

    Design/methodology/approach – A questionnaire was used at three different groups at a dental care provider. ANOVA was used to detect any differences in regards to the importance and practice of five Lean values in relation to time since the clinics started to apply Lean.

    Findings – The study showed no difference between the three groups in relation to the stated importance of the values, something that could indicate that there is a commonly shared value base in the organization. The only difference that was statistically significant was with regard to the presence of the values ‘Continuous improvement’ and ‘Supportive leadership’ between Groups 1 (pilot, 18 month since starting to apply Lean) and 3 (not yet started to apply Lean).

    Research limitation/implications – The research was conducted as one single study in one organization and further research should be done in other organizations and types of businesses.

    Practical implications – The questionnaire can be used in organizations to put focus on cultural change when applying Lean both when it comes to practice as well as importance.

    Originality/value – Traditional measures mainly focus on hard measurements when measuring the progress in applying quality initiatives such as Lean. This questionnaire can complement these traditional measurements and create a greater focus on the cultural changes in the organization.

  • 35.
    Kahm, Therese
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Lean from the First-line Managers’ Perspective: Assuredness about the Effects of Lean as a Driving Force for Sustainable Change2017In: Management and Production Engineering Review, ISSN 2080-8208, E-ISSN 2082-1344, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 49-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to present the results from a survey concerning first-line managers’ assuredness about the effects of Lean after two years of Lean application in a Swedish healthcare organization. The purpose is also to reflect about assuredness as a driving force for sustainable change. Questionnaires were sent to all first-line managers in a healthcare organization in order to investigate how these managers consider their role, ability and conditions to create change according to Lean. One of the questions included 17 statements about how assured these managers were about the effects of Lean. The results from this question will be presented in this paper. The study showed that the majority of the first-line managers in this particular healthcare organization were assured that developmental work supported by Lean contributes to a higher patient focus, supports first-line managers with useful tools and methods, contributes to the development of an improvement culture and that the Lean concept in general is a support in improvement work. The question can either be used separately or as a part of an entire questionnaire in healthcare organizations. Asking first-line managers about their assuredness about the effects of Lean on a regular basis is one way to follow the Lean process from their perspective. The survey question might encourage discussions about the process of Lean and hopefully contribute to a greater understanding about the importance of assuredness and about the desired effects when applying Lean.

  • 36.
    Lilja, Johan
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Forsgren, Olov
    Region Västerbotten.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Noaksson, Erik
    Region Jämtland Härjedalen.
    Nätterlund, Karolina
    Region Jämtland Härjedalen.
    Richardsson, Daniel
    Styrkebaserad.org.
    Åslund, Anna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Insights from Sustainable Cleveland 2019: An Initiative Driving Sustainable Regional Development by Large Scale Summits, Collective Visioning, and lots of Creativity, Culture, and Appreciation2016In: Valuing and Evaluating Creativity for Sustainable Regional Development / [ed] Laven, D. & Skoglund, W., Östersund, 2016, p. 255-258Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Given the current growing challenges regarding sustainability, the need for massive engagement, creative solutions, and large scale change is evident. The challenges are e.g. clearly elaborated in the 17 sustainable development goals recently proposed by the United Nations. In facing these global challenges on a regional level, there is an urgent need for spreading and advancing best practice on how to involve the various citizens of a region in collectively co-designing, driving, and realizing a more sustainable region and future for all.

     

    An initiative that currently is up and running, engaging hundreds of people annually, continuously evolving, and showing promising results of such abilities is Sustainable Cleveland 2019 (“Sustainable Cleveland”, 2016). Starting in 2009, it is a 10-year initiative that engages and invites everyone in the region around Cleveland to work together to design and develop a thriving and resilient Cleveland that leverages its wealth of assets to build economic, social and environmental well-being for all. Since the start, results from the initiative show enhancements of both economic as well as social, cultural, and environmental development of Cleveland and the surrounding region. The initiative is interesting for many reasons, one being the change management approach of Appreciative Inquiry (AI), a promising research based approach from Case Western Reserve University (which is located in the region), which was applied at a large scale and in close collaboration with representatives from the cultural and creative sectors. It is an approach that actively enables, engages, and invites people in co-designing and self-organizing for realizing a more sustainable future in what might be described as an “appreciative social movement” (Boland, 2013). The approach relies on  a process that actively explores citizens’ appreciative perspectives on the best of what is, their dreams and hopes for the future, and how they see that this future can be designed and realized.  At the heart of the initiative is a thoughtfully designed AI large group summit, annually gathering hundreds of participants from all parts of society in a process of co-creation during two days. Interestingly, the application of AI has also been generally observed to provide the fastest, most consistent, and transformative results when focusing on sustainability (Cooperrider & Fry, 2012). Furthermore, the initiative is organized around annual celebration topics as a means to create a common focus within the region on one specific sustainability challenge such as “Clean water”, “Vital Neighborhoods” or “Zero Waste. The term itself, “Celebration Topics”, reflects how the initiative consistently and deliberately applies an “Appreciative Eye”, as described by Cooperrider & Srivastva (1987).  

     

    The purpose of this paper is to identify and contribute insights concerning the strengths of the Sustainable Cleveland 2019 initiative, with a special focus on how it uses the cultural and creative sectors as resources and drivers for sustainable regional development. The cultural and creative sectors refer in this paper to the performing arts and the seven creative fields especially highlighted by UNESCO – Crafts and Folk Arts, Design, Film, Gastronomy, Literature, Media Arts, and Music.

     

     

    Approach

    The paper is based on a case study conducted by the eight authors. Data has mainly been collected by participant observations and interviews with participants and organizers before, during, and after the Sustainable Cleveland summit in September 2015. The initial analysis was conducted during a follow up workshop in October 2015 and was preceded by structured individual reflections. Based on the workshop results, a secondary analysis was conducted where the strengths relating to the cultural and creative sectors were picked out and grouped into themes.  

     

     

    Findings

    As a result, several strengths were identified. During the secondary analysis, those strengths were grouped into three themes as presented below.

     

    1. Making the core process of Sustainable Cleveland 2019 more engaging and fruitful:

    One of the most obvious related strengths is the way the initiative uses practices from the cultural and creative sectors to increase the engagement in, and output of, the core processes. Many of the methods used within the initiative, such as for visioning, creating new ideas, and playfully prototype as a way to explore new ideas, have its roots in the cultural and creative sectors. One example is the practice of “rapid prototyping”, brought in from the design studio IDEO.

     

    2. Nurturing a reverence for the environment, raising awareness, and inspiring action:

    Another strength that relates to using the cultural and creative sectors as resources and drivers for sustainable regional development is the initiative’s close collaboration with local institutions of e.g. theater and music for putting focus on, engaging in, and elaborating the understanding of the annual celebration topics. On example is the short plays “Fire on the Water”, given by the Cleveland Public Theatre during the year of 2015 when the celebration topic was “Clean Water”. This activity focused on issues of sustainability in fun, intimate and personal ways. The work focused on how the environment can shape identity and celebrate the remarkable recovery of Cleveland’s waterways. Another example is the play “Air Waves”, given in 2014, weaving sustainability themes into a story of loss, reckoning, forgiveness and honeybees. Generally, the cultural and creative sectors are very much used as resources to nurture a reverence for the environment and raise awareness about critical issues related to sustainability. More about how the Cleveland Public Theatre, Tri-C, and Inlet Dance Theatre have been using the performing arts to raise consciousness and inspire action around water can be seen in a video produced by the initiative (“New video: How performing arts advance sustainability”, 2016).

     

    3. The cultural and creative sectors themselves are the focus of sustainability action:

    Finally, the cultural and creative sectors themselves are also the focus for sustainable development and action. Obviously, challenges such as decreasing waste, avoiding toxic substances, and lowering energy consumption are relevant also within these sectors themselves. Gastronomy, in terms of “Local Food”, was furthermore chosen as the overall celebration topic of the initiative in 2012 which made this an area for considerable sustainable development actions. As a result, several accomplishments were, and are continuously, achieved related to gastronomy within the initiative (“Local Foods”, 2016).

  • 37.
    Lilja, Johan
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Eriksson, Maria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Commercial experiences from a customer perspective: Elaborated, defined and distinguished2007In: Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Quality Management for Organisational and Regional Development, Lund 18-20/6 2007, Lund: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2007, , p. -Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A new type of business offering is currently gaining much attention, a type which in some aspects appears to be distinct from goods and services. These offerings are usually denoted as commercial experiences and are claimed to provide higher customer value than other types of offerings as they, for example, engage customers in an inherently memorable way. The understanding of what constitutes commercial experiences is however still scant. The purpose of this paper is accordingly to take a closer look at the commercial experience concept from a customer perspective. The paper aims specifically at elaborating and defining commercial experiences as well as distinguishing them from goods and services. Approach The paper is based on literature studies. Findings The authors identify memorable as the fundamental distinctive characteristic for commercial experiences. Memorable events are then shown to be strongly emotional events. Finally the two-factor structure of affect is used to show that the factor �strong engagement� is a critical driver of commercial experiences. As a result of the elaboration the authors also propose a new definition of commercial experiences and distinguish commercial experiences from goods and services in three ways. Originality/Value The paper increases the currently scant understanding of commercial experiences.

  • 38.
    Lilja, Johan
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Eriksson, Maria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Commercial experiences from a customer perspective elaborated, defined and distinguished2010In: The TQM Journal, ISSN 1754-2731, E-ISSN 1754-274X, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 285-292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - A new type of business offering is currently gaining much attention, a type which in some aspects appears to be distinct from goods and services. These offerings are usually denoted as commercial experiences and are claimed to provide higher customer value than other types of offerings as they, for example, engage customers in an inherently memorable way. The understanding of what constitutes commercial experiences is however still scant. The purpose of this paper is to take a closer look at the commercial experience concept from a customer perspective. The paper aims specifically at elaborating and defining commercial experiences as well as distinguishing them from goods and services. Design/methodology/approach - The paper is based on literature studies. Findings - The authors identify memorable as the fundamental distinctive characteristic for commercial experiences. Memorable events are then shown to be strongly emotional events. Finally the two-factor structure of affect is used to show that the factor "strong engagement" is a critical driver of commercial experiences. As a result of the elaboration the authors also propose a new definition of commercial experiences and distinguish commercial experiences from goods and services in three ways. Originality/value - The paper increases the currently scant understanding of commercial experiences.

  • 39.
    Lilja, Johan
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Snyder, Kristen
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Hedlund, Christer
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Metaphors: We Manage and Develop Quality by Screening and Elaborating on the Metaphors of Quality Management2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Metaphors are a powerful and human way of understanding and experiencing one kind of thing in terms of another. In Quality Management (QM) several metaphors are used to describe and bring to life the often abstract QM concepts and systems in clearer terms. These metaphors are undoubtedly of great importance for how QM is understood, communicated and practiced. They can also be assumed to have a significant impact on the perceived attractiveness of, and engagement in, QM systems. However, the metaphors of QM have seldom been systematically screened or put in focus, neither the topic of a critical discussion. The purpose of this paper is hence to contribute with a screening of the metaphors currently used, within QM literature and in practice among QM leaders, and then elaborate on their potential for improvement and development.

    Methodology/Approach: The paper is based on a literature review combined with interviews of QM leaders.

    Findings: The paper highlights that the current QM metaphors provide intuitive associations to properties such as stability, shelter, and structure but not to the important dynamic properties of QM, such as learning, or to the critical role of people in QM. It also provides suggestions for further improvements and development.

    Value of the Paper: The paper highlights the area of metaphors within QM as an important area for future research. It also provides insights concerning the successful use and selection of metaphors in future QM practice.

  • 40.
    Löfstedt, Ulrica
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Computer and System science.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Öberg, Lena-Maria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Computer and System science.
    Can Lean improve the status of Technical Communication?: Taking a system perspective2014In: 17th QMOD-ICQSS Conference, Prague, Czech Republic: Entering the Experience Economy – from product quality to experience quality / [ed] Su Mi Dahlgard-Park and Jens J. Dahlgaard, Lund: Lund University Library Press , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper was to present best practices and areas of improvement in Technical Communication (TC) analyzed with Lean values as a base. The purpose was also to analyze the results from a holistic perspective using the Synergy-4 model.Methodology- To fulfill the purpose, 15 interviews in four different companies have been conducted. The interviews were analyzed and the results were categorized into a number of predefined Lean areas. The results from the Lean values were then further analyzed with the Synergy-4 model as a base.Results - Taking a Lean perspective could enhance the status on TC with regard to finding ways to incorporate the customer’s voice more clearly when it comes to strengthening the role of TC. The result from the analyses indicates that Lean and Synergy-4 can enrich each other.

  • 41.
    Mårtensson, Anna
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Managers basic assumptions when applying Lean2013In: 16th QMOD-ICQSS Proceedings: Quality Management and Organizational Development Conference [being] International Conference Quality and Service Sciences / [ed] Su Mi Dahlgaard-Park, Jens J. Dahlgaard, Boštjan Gomišček, 2013, p. 1206-1215Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to present the result from a case study were managers where interviewed in order to find out their basic assumptions (i.e. purpose and underlying values) for applying Lean. The purpose is also to investigate if these basic assumptions are in line with what the literature describes as important for succeeding when applying Lean.

     

    Methodology/approach – Interviews based on an interview guide with open questions were carried out with managers in an organization.

    Findings – The study showed that the reason given for applying Lean are different between a manager that has started to apply Lean and a manager that has not yet started to apply Lean in their organization and that it is a difference between their basic assumptions.

     

    Originality/Value – The paper indicates the importance of knowing the managers’ values when applying Lean and the importance to educate managers’ to get a deeper understanding of Lean.

    Paper type Case study

  • 42.
    Mårtensson, Anna
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Öberg, Lena-Maria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Computer and System science.
    Can Lean values contribute to Sustainable Development2014In: 17th Qmod-ICQSS: Part 2: INDEX and FULLPAPERS / [ed] Su Mi Dahlgaard-Park, Jens Jörn Dahlgaard, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The aim of this paper was to study interactions between Sustainable Development and Lean values by comparing two organizations, one with Technical Communication in-house and one with Technical Communication partly outsourced.

    Methodology/approach – A literature study with focus on Lean and Sustainable Development values was carried out. Interviews with companies that provide Technical Communication have been conducted to identify Lean categories. The identified categories have been compared to the findings in Lean and Sustainable Development values.

    Findings – The literature study and our results indicate that presence of Lean values support Sustainable Development, but it requires that organizations focus on the culture and values. The result indicates that if Technical Communication has a low status the company put low value on Sustainable Development. If Technical Communication is produced in-house customer involvement might be easier to achieve.

    Practical implications – The identification of Lean values can be a starting point for organizations to work with Sustainable Development as it helps the organizations to focus on significant areas.

    Paper type – Case study

  • 43.
    Mårtensson, Anna
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Snyder, Kristen
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Interlinking Lean and Sustainability: How ready are leaders?In: Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore evidence of interlinkages between Lean and Sustainability among organisational leaders in the early stages of Lean implementation.

    Design/methodology: In this study, a multiple-site case study approach was used to gain insight into the connections between Lean and Sustainable Development during the implementation stages of a Lean practice. In-depth interviews were conducted with managers from four different units in one organisation regarding their perceptions about Lean in order to find out if they have knowledge and understanding about the interlinked areas between Lean and Sustainable Development. A literature study was conducted to identify those dimensions with interlinkages between Lean and sustainability. The findings were then used as an analytic frame determine whether these interlinkages were present in the organisation.

    Findings: Evidence of dimensions with interlinkages between Lean and Sustainable Development was found; however, their presence was incomplete and inconsistent across clinics.

    Research implications: The insights from the research can help organisations plan for the implementation of Lean practice, particularly when a sub-goal is to achieve Sustainable Development.

    Originality/value:

    The study shows the importance of focusing on managers’ knowledge and understanding of the interlinkages between Lean and Sustainable Development when implementing Lean in order to utilise Leans full potential when it comes to achieving Sustainability.

  • 44.
    Snyder, Kristen
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Using design thinking to foster value-based leadership and quality culture2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Snyder, Kristen
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Hedlund, Christer
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Storytelling: a co-creative process to support value-based leadership2017In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 9, no 3/4, p. 484-497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to identify constraints and possibilities to develop a value-based leadership in manufacturing using storytelling as a co-creative method and process.

    Design/methodology/approach

    A multi-site case study was conducted in which storytelling was used as a data collection tool and co-creative process to explore dimensions in the company’s cultures that could provide a deeper understanding about the constraints and possibilities that exist for developing value-based leadership in manufacturing.

    Findings

    Storytelling has a positive impact on leadership and communication highlighting important aspects of the organizational culture to support sustainable development and innovation.

    Originality/value

    This study demonstrates how storytelling can be used by leaders in manufacturing to build cultures of innovation and sustainability. And identifies constrains and possibilities for developing value-based leadership.

  • 46.
    Snyder, Kristen
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Hedlund, Christer
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Storytelling as a co-creative process to build cultures of quality, innovation and sustainability2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Snyder, Kristen
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Conceptualizing a research framework to study systemic Lean transformation: A Critical Review2015In: 18th QMOD-ICQSS, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Snyder, Kristen
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Enhancing the study of Lean transformation through organizational culture analysis2016In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 395-411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify and synthesize approaches to studying Lean transformation to further develop a comprehensive approach that integrates organizational culture analysis and performance measurement systems from a systems perspective. Design/methodology/approach: This paper is conceptual in nature and based on a review of the literature in the areas of measuring Lean transformation and studying organizational culture. Three questions guide this conceptual analysis: “What approaches have been used to examine Lean transformation in business and public sector organizations?”; “Is there evidence of a focus on organizational culture in the measurement practices in Lean transformation and, if so, how?”; and “What can we learn from organizational cultural theorists about developing a more comprehensive framework to study Lean transformation?”. The analysis was conducted in two phases: In Phase 1, a database search was conducted using the key words Lean transformation, studying Lean, studying Lean transformation, studying organizational culture in Lean and measuring Lean, from which eight papers were selected. In Phase 2, the authors reviewed two models for studying organizational culture. Findings: Findings indicated that the dominant approach to study and measure Lean transformation is based on the performance measurement model. Based on this approach, there was little evidence of a focus on organizational culture, and few integrated the human dimensions with the tools and practices. The authors also found evidence of a greater awareness of the need to develop a balanced performance measurement system that reflects both the subjective soft measures and the objective hard measures. Among the approaches studied, two models did reflect integration between hard and soft measures: Dahlgaard et al.’s (2011) 4Ps and Najem et al. ’s (2012) assessment model for studying organizational culture in Lean. Both of these methods provide a strong framework from which to further enhance the study of Lean transformation by incorporating elements from Bantz’s (1993) organizational communication culture method and Martin’s (1992) Matrix concept. Originality/value: This paper furthers the academic dialogue on measuring Lean transformation through its unique analysis of studying organizational culture.

  • 49.
    Snyder, Kristen
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Helping leaders develop value-based leadership2016In: EurOMA Conference Proceedings: Interactions, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Åslund, Anna
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Understanding and living by an organization's values in order to create customer value2015In: Creating a Sustainable future through Quality: on Quality and Service ICQSS 2015, October 12-14, Lund: Lund University Press , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Many unsuccessful implementations of QM initiatives can be contributed to the facts that tools and methods have been in focus and the systemic management philosophy have been overlooked. With a main focus on tools important intents and nuances are missed and a focus on values and culture should be equally emphasized. There is a strong connection between organizational culture, values and behaviors and to make values understandable there is a need to translate them into behaviors. Any QM initiative is difficult to implement if the focus is only on the hard quality side, i.e. tools and methods so there is a need to take into consideration the soft side, i.e. people and culture. There is a need to understand what the values mean to an organization and also to connect the values to the creation of customer value.

    Purpose - the purpose of this paper is to present a developed and tested systemic method for identifying those specific values that support the higher purpose of an organization, discovering what they mean for that organization and then activating them, in order to enhance the ability to identify and create customer value.

     

    Methodology/approach – Through literature studies of the concept Lean, TQM, organizational culture creation and customer value creation a method has been developed, tested and evaluated.

    Findings – A method to understand and live by an organization’s values has been developed and tested, a method that provides opportunities to identify and activate what specific values mean to an organization to enhance its ability to identify and create customer value. The developed method can aid the organization in its work to live by and connects values with working methods, tools and the customer value propositions of an organization.

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