miun.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 50 of 50
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Abrahamsson, Camilla
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Hedlund, Christer
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Towards New Levels of Creating/Improving and Understanding Value in Swedish Municipalities: A Review of Research on Understanding and Creating Value in Municipal Quality Development by Qualitative Approaches (and Co-Creation)2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Quality management and Lean initiatives are currently widespread in the Swedish municipal sector. It is also made clear that all Lean initiatives should be initiated to benefit the customer and not for internal organizational reasons. However, the practices currently used for understanding value creation in the municipalities tend to focus heavily on the use of numerical, quantitative approaches. In sharp contrast, the growing field of, for example, design thinking argue that qualitative approaches are key when it comes to getting closer to the citizens, establishing new levels of understanding and thereby inspiring new and better solutions. In sum, it seems likely that municipalities are struggling with developing quality due to relying, in too one-sided on the use of quantitative rather than qualitative approaches to understand and spark new levels of value creation. The purpose of this paper is to contribute with a review of research concerning qualitative approaches for understanding and co-creating value in municipal quality development.

     

    Methodology/Approach The paper is based on a literature review.

     

    Findings The paper provides an overview of previous research concerning practices for evaluating and understanding value creation in the context of a municipal quality development.

     

    Value of the paper

    This overview is of value for practitioners within the context, as well as researchers that wants to contribute within this area.

  • 2.
    Boström, Jonas
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics. Landstinget Västernorrland, Sundsvall.
    Hillborg, Helene
    Landstinget Västernorrland, Sundsvall.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Cultural Change of Applying User Involvement for Improving Healthcare Quality: A Review of the Impact on Attitudes, Values and Assumptions among Healthcare Professionals and Users2017In: Quality Innovation Prosperity, ISSN 1335-1745, E-ISSN 1338-984X, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 158-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to provide a review of the impact on culture (attitudes, values and assumptions) among both healthcare professionals, as well as users, when involving users for improving quality in healthcare.

    Methodology/Approach: The paper is based on an extensive, narrative literature review considering studies that included professional’s and users experiences of user involvement in quality improvement. The included articles were analyzed using an interpretive, along with a deductive, approach according to a theoretical framework.

    Findings: The results indicate that there is currently limited research focusing on the impact of user involvement in quality improvement processes regarding professionals’ and users’ attitudes, values and/or assumptions. The articles identified during the study provides situations and statements, during the process of development, which can be interpreted as change in the culture. Although few articles specifically draw conclusions on user involvement as a “tool” for cultural change, the authors interpret several findings which strengthens that theory.

    Research Limitation/implication: Research published in other databases could have been missed. The authors have tried to avoid this by using a snowball method reading references in identified articles.

    Originality/Value of paper: The review provides a platform for both future research and the development of current practice within the area. There have been literature reviews showing obstacles and enablers when using patients, users and relatives in quality improvement work, but few which investigates cultural change.

  • 3.
    Boström, Jonas
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Hillborg, Helene
    Region Västernorrland.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Cultural Impact of Applying User Involvement  for Improving Healthcare Quality: A review of the impact on attitudes, values and assumptions among healthcare professionals and users2016In: Proceedings of the 19th QMOD Conference: Building a Culture for Quality, Innovation and Sustainability, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this study is to provide a review of the impact on culture (attitudes, values and assumptions) among both healthcare professionals, as well as users, when involving users for improving quality in healthcare.

    Method

    The paper is based on an extensive, narrative literature review, covering 3786 papers.

    Findings

    The results indicate that there is currently limited research focusing on the impact of user involvement in quality improvement processes regarding professionals’ and users´ attitudes, values and/or assumptions. The articles identified during the study mentions situations and things which are said, during the process of development, and which can be interpreted as change in the culture. Although few articles specifically draw conclusions on user involvement as a “tool” for cultural change, the authors interpret several findings which strengthens that theory.

    Research limitations

    Research published in other databases could have been missed. The authors have tried to avoid this by using a snowball method reading references in identified articles.

    Practical implications

    Future research is needed to see if involvement activities in quality improvement processes can affect attitudes, values and assumptions in a positive way.

    Originality

    The review provides a platform for both future research and the development of current practice within the area. There has been literature reviews showing obstacles and enablers when using patients, users and relatives in quality improvement work, but few which investigates cultural change.

  • 4.
    Boström, Jonas
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Hillborg, Helene
    Region Västernorrland.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Exploring Cultural Dynamics and Tensions when Applying Design Thinking for Improving Healthcare Quality: What is really going on?2018In: Proceedings of the 21th QMOD Conference: Building a Culture for Quality, Innovation and Sustainability / [ed] Su Mi Park-Daahlgard, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose:

    The purpose of this paper is to contribute knowledge concerning the dynamics and potential cultural tensions that occur when applying user involvement and design thinking for improving quality in a healthcare setting.

    Method:

    The paper is based on a case study following a quality improvement project (QI) in a medium sized Swedish county council in the field of somatic care. The project involved eight healthcare professionals, one designer, four patients and two relatives. A multiple data collection method over a period of 10 months was used. It included individual interviews, e-mail correspondence and observations of workshops that covered the QI project.

    Findings:

    The result shows tensions between QI work and the daily clinical work of the participants. These tensions primarily concern the conflict between fast and slow processes, the problem of moving between different fields of knowledge, being a resource for the individual clinic and the system, and the participants' expectations and assumptions about roles and responsibilities in a QI project. Furthermore these findings could be interpreted as signs of a development culture in the healthcare context.

    Practical Implications:

    There are several practical implications. Among others, the insights can inspire how to approach and contextualize the current concepts, roles and methods of design thinking and user involvement so that they can be more easily understood and integrated into the existing culture and way of working in the healthcare sector.

    Originality:

    The study provides a unique insight into a case, trying to uncover what actually is going on, and perhaps why certain things are not happening at all, when user involvement and design practices are applied for improving healthcare quality.

  • 5.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Snyder, Kristen
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Hedlund, Christer
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Capturing Value-based leadership in Practice:: Insights from developing and applying an AI-interview guide2017In: Challenges and Opportunities of Quality in the 4th Industrial Revolution: On quality and service sciences ICQSS 2017 / [ed] Dahlgaard-Park, Su Mi and Dahlgaard, Jens J., 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    One of the most critical aspects for building quality and innovation in organizations is the role of values. Performance suffers when organizations fail to prioritize values. A challenge for many leaders is to understand deep-rooted values together with what they are and how they are developed. These deep-rooted values are reflected in the behaviors, language and signs occurring in the organization and can be seen as the organizations culture. When a culture is shaped, leadership is central and the managers in the organization are vital. Managers in an organization affect the predominating culture through their behaviors and approach to their co-workers. This make it interesting to try to find out underlying values held by managers striving for good leadership and performance. Underlying values can be unconscious and taken for granted, and thereby hard to ask about.  By using an interview guide inspired by Appreciative Inquiry (AI) (an approach based on generativity and positivity), underlying values and the leadership used by top managers can be discovered.

     

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to present and discuss the results from the Appreciative Inquiry (AI) inspired interviews to explore the underlying values held by top manager and to identify soft aspects of leadership.

     

    Methodology/approach – Top managers were interviewed as a part of a research project with the aim to support the development of value-based leadership that integrates company values, organizational culture, customer needs and sustainable development. A structured interview guide, inspired by AI, was developed and used to pinpoint their motivation and vision of a good organization in order to understand the values the leaders had and to identify soft aspects of leadership.  The interviews were analyzed in workshops with the whole research group and structured and visualized through affinity chart.

     

    Findings – The results show underlying values held by top managers and identified soft aspects of leadership.

     

    Practical implications – The presented interview guide can be used to identify the top managers underlying values and the presented results from the interviews can be used to inspire other leaders to develop their leadership in their striving of good leadership and effective organizations.

  • 6.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Snyder, Kristen
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Hedlund, Christer
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Capturing value-based leadership in practice: Insights from developing and applying an AI-interview guide2018In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 422-430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to present and discuss the results from the appreciative inquiry (AI)-inspired interviews to explore the underlying values held by top managers and to identify soft aspects ofleadership.Design/methodology/approach – Top managers were interviewed as a part of a research project withthe aim to support the development of value-based leadership that integrates company values, organizationalculture, customer needs and sustainable development. A structured interview guide, inspired by AI, wasdeveloped and used to pinpoint their motivation and vision of a good organization to understand the valuesthat the managers had and to identify soft aspects of leadership. The interviews were analyzed in workshopswith the whole research teamand structured and visualized through affinity diagrams.Findings – The results showed the underlying values held by top managers and identified soft aspects ofleadership.Practical implications – The presented interview guide can be used to identify the top managers’underlying values, and the presented results from the interviews can be used to inspire other managers andleaders to develop their leadership in their striving of good leadership and effective organizations.Originality/value – The paper explains how to apply an AI-inspired interview guide in finding out valuebasedleadership and soft aspects of leadership for enhancing organizational culture.

  • 7.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Snyder, Kristen
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Hedlund, Christer
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Collection of baseline data – expanding the scope2016In: EurOMA 2016 - Interactions, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For leaders to successfully meet the complexity of businesses today, many argue the need to design a performance measurement system that integrates hard data outcomes with soft measures found in organizational culture including values, norms, and behaviors. The purpose of this paper is to present an approach to collecting baseline data that captures the soft dimensions of organizational culture with system thinking as a guiding theory. The results present an approach for measuring the soft dimensions of organizational culture with description of methods, the type of data and what level of organizational culture they measure.

  • 8.
    Eriksson, Maria
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Achieving shared values: Learning from Disney2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The need to achieve a strong corporate culture is one of the key questions within Total Quality Management (TQM). TQM is generally considered to be based on a number of core values; such as customer focus, decisions based on facts, process orientation, continuous improvement, everybody’s commitment and leadership, (Hellsten & Klefsjö, 2000). The core values should ideally be conformed to by all employees within a TQM organization, (ibid). Achieving these core values seems to be rewarding. Many companies that have succeeded in adapting their core values have received quality awards, e.g. Malcolm Baldridge National Quality Award and EFQM Excellence Model. These quality awards are based on values that are widely considered to be the building blocks of effective TQM implementation (Hendricks & Singhal, 1999). There are a lot of descriptions in literature about the importance of working with the ideas of TQM such as putting focus on the customer, establishing processes and also about educating the employees in using tools of improvement, but very little focus on discussing how shared values really are achieved.   A common set of values within an organization is often referred to as the company or corporate culture. A strong culture implies that there is uniformity among the employees regarding, for example values (Pinder 1998). In our literature studies we came across two interesting strategies that combined together provide a tactic for working with shared values to attain a strong corporate culture. According to Chatman (1989) the best way is an integration of the strategies of selection and socialization. That implies both considering values at the selection when the organization chooses its members, by recruiting an individual with the right values and later on by maintaining or reinforcing values by socialization which can be done by training, orientation and other methods. As regards working with achieving TQM values we mostly encountered the use of socialization and feel that there is a need for broader thinking by putting greater emphasis on the selection process when recruiting new members into the organization.   The purpose of this paper is to raise the discussion about how to achieve homogeneity of values, such as TQM values in order to be a successful organization. The presented theories are accompanied by an observation from the renowned Walt Disney World in Florida, providing an example of how they are working with the selection strategy.

  • 9.
    Hansen, David
    et al.
    David Hansen Xpertise, Denmark.
    Jørgensen, Rasmus
    Technical University of Denmark.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    How daily operational meetings can support transformation to a lean improvement culture2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With pressure for creating more value with fewer resources, many organizations pursue becoming Lean. However, many are unsuccessful in the transformation necessary for sustainable change, such as creating an improvement culture. This study investigates how operational meetings, offering frequent touch points, can be used to intentionally support cultural transformation. An explorative case study identified more than 30 types of meeting activities in five categories: Information, Action, Sparring, Learning, and Relational. A comparative case study then investigated meeting set-ups and their role in supporting cultural change. The analysis shows how meeting set-ups can be designed to support cultural transformation.

  • 10.
    Hansen, David
    et al.
    Aalborg Universitet .
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Jørgensen, Rasmus
    Technical University of Denmark.
    How Positive Practices at Work can Accelerate Transformation to a Lean Improvement Culture and Improve Organizational Effectiveness2018In: BOOK OF ABSTRACTS: 9th European Conference on Positive Psychology, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organizations striving for operational excellence face new challenges in a world increasingly characterized by volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity [1]. For decades, one of the answers to achieving operational excellence has been to pursue a continuous improvement culture such as through the Lean philosophy in order to engage and empower employees to continuously optimize resource utilization and thereby increase competitiveness [2]. However, many organizations only get short-term gains out of their efforts and fail with an actual Lean transformation and frequently, cultural change is mentioned as the hardest to manage [3]. At all organizational levels, people get under pressure that frequently leads to behavior un-favoring long-term excellence and certainly inhibiting continuous improvement culture. Psychological mechanisms induced by fear and high tempo are possible explanations.

    This paper aims for investigating whether positive practices at work [4] can accelerate transformation to a Lean improvement culture and contribute to improved organizational effectiveness.

    The study was carried out as an exploratory case study. The selected organization was identified due to its history with experimenting with positive practices and explicit focus on and strategic need for developing a Lean improvement culture. During the study, the researchers had extensive access to investigate daily operational improvement practices at the manufacturing plant. First, all improvement practices were mapped and the positive practices identified. Second, the improvement practices were analysed to assess their impact on developing Lean improvement culture together with a discussion of the difference between traditional improvement practices and the identified positive practices. Third, the positive practices with the highest assessed impact were further analysed in depth to investigate to what degree they also contributed to organizational effectiveness.

     

    References

    1. Bennett, N. & Lemoine, G. J. (2014). What VUCA really means for you. Harvard Business Review, 92(1), 27.

    2. Arlbjørn, J. S. & Freytag, P. V. (2013). Evidence of lean: a review of international peer-reviewed journal articles. International Journal of Operations and Production Management, 25(2), 174-205.

    3. Liker, J. K. (2004). The Toyota Way. New York: McGraw-Hill.

    4. Cameron, K., Mora, C., Leutscher, T. & Calarco, M. (2011). Effects of Positive Practices on Organizational Effectiveness. Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, 47(3), 266-308.

  • 11.
    Hansen, David
    et al.
    David Hansen Xpertise, Denmark.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Richardsson, Daniel
    Styrkebaserad.org, Sweden.
    Jørgensen, Rasmus
    Technical University of Denmark.
    Stop Burning Platforms! Quality Culture Requires Generative Metaphors2017In: Proceedings of the 20th QMOD Conference: Challenges and Opportunities of Quality in the 4th Industrial Revolution / [ed] Su Mi Dahlgaard Park, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Hedlund, Christer
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Snyder, Kristen
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics. Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Continuous Improvement of Leadership: Evaluation of peer-coaching experiments2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates continuous improvement of leadership with the aid of coaching and specifically peer-coaching as a model for leadership improvement. The paper is based on the idea of experimental learning both as a tool to motivate, educate and inspire leaders in two studied organizations. Learning-by-doing along with reflection has formed the basis for leadership improvement and leadership awareness in this study. The concept of Developing- by-doing have been used to help leaders design the foundation of an organizational specific coaching model. 

  • 13.
    Hedlund, Christer
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Snyder, Kristen
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Research On Toyota Kata? Proposing A Future Research Agenda For The Emerging Practice2016In: EurOMA Conference Proceedings: Interactions 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the bestselling book “Toyota Kata” was first published in 2009 the practices of the Toyota Kata has spread quickly among practitioners and consultants all over the world. However, the number of academic papers and studies concerning Toyota Kata occurs as remarkably sparse. Based on the apparent gap, this paper identifies and proposes a future research agenda on Toyota Kata based on a survey with Swedish Toyota Kata experts. As a result, 20 areas are highlighted and identified as the currently most desirable to understand and study more closely. Based on the areas, six themes are also identified and formulated. 

  • 14.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Snyder, Kristen
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Hedlund, Christer
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Using the employee satisfaction survey as a tool for building organizational culture2016In: EurOMA Conference Proceedings: Interactions, 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a strong relationship between employee satisfaction and organizational results and using an employee surveys effectively could support quality improvements and organizational culture. The purpose of this paper is to present an employee satisfaction survey designed to change organizational culture and co-worker behaviors. Included in the analysis are results from that survey focusing on culture and leadership. The results show that asking a different kind of questions in an employee satisfaction survey and analyzing the results in more detail could give an organization a management tool to be used both to monitor and to build organizational culture.

  • 15.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Snyder, Kristen
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Hedlund, Christer
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Truly changing the culture – learnings from a value-based top leader2017In: 20th QMOD conference: Challenges and Opportunities of Quality in the 4th Industrial Revolution / [ed] Su Mi Dahlgaard Park, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Both TQM and Lean are said to rest on a number of values that in turn are said to be the building blocks of the organizational culture needed to successfully apply TQM or Lean in an organization. The reason why applying Lean or TQM fail is frequently explained by the lack of focusing on values and culture and instead too big focus on tools and methods. In this context, leadership is often mentioned as one if the main keys to change the organizational culture as the leaders in organizations are the bearer of values. There is also a strong connection between values held and behaviors shown by the leaders and the co-workers in the organization. So the question arises; how come it´s so hard to make the change in leadership behaviors and by that the organizational culture? At the same time, there are leaders succeeding with consciously changing the culture and the values held by the co-workers. What can we learn from such a leaders that have succeeded in changing an exciting culture in an organization?

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to present the values held by and the ways of working used by a top leader (COO) with the aim to change the organizational culture.

    Methodology/approach – The Chief Operating Officer (COO) of a successful Lean company was interviewed in order to identify the managers´ values as well as ways of working. A developed interview guide was used to get an understanding of the values the leader had and to identify “other” softer aspects of his leadership. The results from the study was analyzed by the researchers, first by each researcher individually, then in workshops as a group.

    Findings – The results show that the COO appears to have an understanding about the connection between values and behaviors something shown by the close connection between the identified ways of working and values. The result also shows ways of working to achieve a cultural change, were the use of ROFO can be seen as a driving force for this. The COO displays a leadership and a value-base much in line with Lean leadership and value-base.Practical implications – The presented results can be used by leaders in different types of organization in their work with developing the culture and leadership.

  • 16.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Eriksson, Maria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Can selecting the right values help TQM implementation?: A case study about organisational homogeneity at the Walt Disney Company2012In: Total Quality Management and Business Excellence, ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Total Quality Management, TQM, is often referred to as a value based management philosophy, built on a set of core values. These TQM values should ideally be conformed to by all employees in order to achieve a thriving organisation. A strong organisational culture with shared core values can therefore be identified as of importance for a successful TQM implementation. This paper discusses how organisations need to act in order to achieve shared values among co-workers. In the theory two strategies appear: to select people who appear to possess the desired values in the first place and to socialize employees once hired. When working with TQM, several examples of socialization can be found in described techniques and tools, however the selection strategy seems to be both unapplied and underestimated. In order to find empirical examples a case study was conducted at an organisation which is renowned for the way in which they work with values. A conclusion of this paper is that, as a complement to the use of socialization, a selection strategy is proposed in order to achieve shared values in order to facilitate TQM implementation.

  • 17.
    Jørgensen, Rasmus
    et al.
    Technical University of Denmark.
    Hansen, David
    Resonans A/S.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    How positive practices can accelerate transformation to a Lean improvement culture2016In: EUROMA 2016, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With increasing pressure on creating more value with fewer resources, many organizations pursue continuous improvement culture and practices in daily operations. In operations management Lean and the Toyota Way have been continuous improvement role models for describing tools and culture. However, the cultural transformation has been reported difficult to achieve. This study investigates how practices in daily operations can be used to purposely support the cultural transformation. During an explorative case study 9 practices were identified and analysed. The study showed that positive practices based on appreciative inquiry and positive psychology were particularly effective in accelerating cultural transformation.

  • 18.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Quality practice and customer value: strengthening the ideal linkage2005Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Quality management is continuously evolving and the progression so far is frequently described in terms of four stages. According to these descriptions, Total Quality Management (TQM) constitutes the currently highest level, or fourth stage, of quality management. Despite the divergence of views on what constitutes TQM, it is commonly described as a number of diverse activities, here designated as quality practice, performed to display and embody a certain set of values. One of these values, acknowledged as central to TQM, is to focus on the customers. This value basically implies that a TQM organization should adapt its operations to what creates value for its customers. Hence, there is ideally a strong linkage between the application of quality practice and the creation of customer value. In a wider perspective, this linkage fundamentally determines the vital contribution of quality practice to competitiveness.

     

    However, this linkage has so far been given poor attention among quality researchers. Furthermore, differences of opinions exist regarding its strength. It has for instance been argued that quality practices commonly included in TQM lack a linkage to customer value, decrease the competitiveness of the organization in which they are implemented, and hinder the organization’s ability to create customer value.

     

    The aim of this thesis is accordingly to examine the ideal linkage between quality practice and customer value in order to increase its strength. In accordance to the idea of continuous improvement, the aim is to improve the reflection of the value ‘focus on the customers’ in quality practice.

     

    The research process described in this thesis has started by examining and developing the current theoretical foundation and models of TQM concerning customer value, in terms of the theory of attractive quality. Furthermore, an affective conceptualization of customer value has been used as a basis for an initial examination of the ideal linkage.

     

    Among the presented results it is indicated that quality practice, including the measures currently used to capture customer perceptions, is more or less restricted to negative motivations of external customers. Negative motivations basically stem from the customers strive to avoid and reduce negative emotional states. The linkage to positive motivations of the external customers is seemingly much weaker or even absent. The indicated focus can be seen as a reflection of early theories of motivation emphasizing negative motivations as the governing principle. Modern theories emphasize, however, both negative and positive motivations. The sole emphasis on negative motivations indicated in current quality practice would imply that external customers prefer to exist in a state of boring neutrality. A dual emphasis recognizes that while our customers want to minimize pain and disappointment, they want to maximize pleasure as well, to make life interesting and stimulating. An extension of quality practice, including the use of multiple output measures, is suggested to increasing the reflection of this duality of customer value in TQM. As a foundation for such an extension, a two-dimensional perspective on the mechanisms involved in the strong positive emotional state associated with attractive quality elements has been proposed. The proposed perspective points at two separate mechanisms in terms of the satisfaction of high-level needs and latent needs

     

  • 19.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    The Realization of Attractive Quality: Conceptual and practical perspectives within the TQM system2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the quality community, quality management is often pictured as and referred to as rapidly evolving and continuously learning by interaction with the surrounding world. In general, an ability to evolve and transform is also seen as most desirable and the only choice for long term survival. In line with this picture, quality scholars, consultants, and practitioners strongly accentuate the necessity and great benefits from continuous improvement as well as systematic collection and usage of facts about what customers really value, to guide such improvement. This is reflected in the exhortations “improve continuously”, “focus on the customer” and “base decisions on facts”, found with minor variations in most modern quality literature. Strong exhortations mainly directed outwards, towards the many leaders and organizations out there. Towards leaders and organizations that still have not grasped the necessity and great winnings from continuous improvement, that are still not fully applying modern quality initiatives like Total Quality Management (TQM).

     

    However, while seemingly being busy exhorting others, doubts have been increasingly raised concerning whether TQM, as currently applied, actually lives up to these exhortations. Does TQM itself continuously improve and evolve? Is the current application of TQM really taking into account facts in the surrounding world about what customers value?

     

    When viewing TQM as a system, as now is commonly done, the problem implied is a lack of system goal fulfillment, questioning if the current TQM system’s structure and processes are really purposeful. More specifically the critics highlight the inadequacy of the current reactive one-sided defect avoidance focus, stressing that defects do not matter much if you are making a product no one wants to buy. What can be referred to as “an obsession with error avoidance” is in fact shown to stifle both innovation and value creation.

     

    As for what the TQM system currently is missing, the shortcoming is often referred to as a lack of focus on Attractive Quality. That is, a lack of focus on a different kind of quality elements, often described as being unrelated to the dissatisfaction expressed, but strongly contributing to the customer’s positive emotions, such as delight. The inclusion and realization of Attractive Quality has been widely emphasized as important and urgent for more than 20 years. However, a more systematic inclusion and realization within the TQM system has remained no more than merely “a vision”. A situation seemingly supporting the argument that TQM really has failed in terms of continuously evolving and improving. An inability to learn and adapt that in the long term will jeopardize the survival of the entire TQM system.

     

    This thesis then aims to move “from a vision to reality” both in terms of exploring the realization of Aattractive Qquality within TQM, and in a wider sense towards realizing the desired state of TQM as truly evolving and alive. In doing so the thesis addresses the three questions of what, why and how the vision of a more systematic creation of Aattractive Qquality creation actually should and could be realized within the system of TQM. Among the results presented in this thesis are a new two-dimensional perspective on Attractive Quality and a re-understanding of the TQM system. The thesis also introduces a new methodology called Attraction Detection Study (ADS) as part of the concluding suggestions about how Attractive Quality could be more systematically created within the system of TQM.

     

  • 20.
    Lilja, Johan
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Forsgren, Olov
    Region Västerbotten.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Noaksson, Erik
    Region Jämtland Härjedalen.
    Nätterlund, Karolina
    Region Jämtland Härjedalen.
    Richardsson, Daniel
    Styrkebaserad.org.
    Åslund, Anna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Insights from Sustainable Cleveland 2019: An Initiative Driving Sustainable Regional Development by Large Scale Summits, Collective Visioning, and lots of Creativity, Culture, and Appreciation2016In: Valuing and Evaluating Creativity for Sustainable Regional Development / [ed] Laven, D. & Skoglund, W., Östersund, 2016, p. 255-258Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Given the current growing challenges regarding sustainability, the need for massive engagement, creative solutions, and large scale change is evident. The challenges are e.g. clearly elaborated in the 17 sustainable development goals recently proposed by the United Nations. In facing these global challenges on a regional level, there is an urgent need for spreading and advancing best practice on how to involve the various citizens of a region in collectively co-designing, driving, and realizing a more sustainable region and future for all.

     

    An initiative that currently is up and running, engaging hundreds of people annually, continuously evolving, and showing promising results of such abilities is Sustainable Cleveland 2019 (“Sustainable Cleveland”, 2016). Starting in 2009, it is a 10-year initiative that engages and invites everyone in the region around Cleveland to work together to design and develop a thriving and resilient Cleveland that leverages its wealth of assets to build economic, social and environmental well-being for all. Since the start, results from the initiative show enhancements of both economic as well as social, cultural, and environmental development of Cleveland and the surrounding region. The initiative is interesting for many reasons, one being the change management approach of Appreciative Inquiry (AI), a promising research based approach from Case Western Reserve University (which is located in the region), which was applied at a large scale and in close collaboration with representatives from the cultural and creative sectors. It is an approach that actively enables, engages, and invites people in co-designing and self-organizing for realizing a more sustainable future in what might be described as an “appreciative social movement” (Boland, 2013). The approach relies on  a process that actively explores citizens’ appreciative perspectives on the best of what is, their dreams and hopes for the future, and how they see that this future can be designed and realized.  At the heart of the initiative is a thoughtfully designed AI large group summit, annually gathering hundreds of participants from all parts of society in a process of co-creation during two days. Interestingly, the application of AI has also been generally observed to provide the fastest, most consistent, and transformative results when focusing on sustainability (Cooperrider & Fry, 2012). Furthermore, the initiative is organized around annual celebration topics as a means to create a common focus within the region on one specific sustainability challenge such as “Clean water”, “Vital Neighborhoods” or “Zero Waste. The term itself, “Celebration Topics”, reflects how the initiative consistently and deliberately applies an “Appreciative Eye”, as described by Cooperrider & Srivastva (1987).  

     

    The purpose of this paper is to identify and contribute insights concerning the strengths of the Sustainable Cleveland 2019 initiative, with a special focus on how it uses the cultural and creative sectors as resources and drivers for sustainable regional development. The cultural and creative sectors refer in this paper to the performing arts and the seven creative fields especially highlighted by UNESCO – Crafts and Folk Arts, Design, Film, Gastronomy, Literature, Media Arts, and Music.

     

     

    Approach

    The paper is based on a case study conducted by the eight authors. Data has mainly been collected by participant observations and interviews with participants and organizers before, during, and after the Sustainable Cleveland summit in September 2015. The initial analysis was conducted during a follow up workshop in October 2015 and was preceded by structured individual reflections. Based on the workshop results, a secondary analysis was conducted where the strengths relating to the cultural and creative sectors were picked out and grouped into themes.  

     

     

    Findings

    As a result, several strengths were identified. During the secondary analysis, those strengths were grouped into three themes as presented below.

     

    1. Making the core process of Sustainable Cleveland 2019 more engaging and fruitful:

    One of the most obvious related strengths is the way the initiative uses practices from the cultural and creative sectors to increase the engagement in, and output of, the core processes. Many of the methods used within the initiative, such as for visioning, creating new ideas, and playfully prototype as a way to explore new ideas, have its roots in the cultural and creative sectors. One example is the practice of “rapid prototyping”, brought in from the design studio IDEO.

     

    2. Nurturing a reverence for the environment, raising awareness, and inspiring action:

    Another strength that relates to using the cultural and creative sectors as resources and drivers for sustainable regional development is the initiative’s close collaboration with local institutions of e.g. theater and music for putting focus on, engaging in, and elaborating the understanding of the annual celebration topics. On example is the short plays “Fire on the Water”, given by the Cleveland Public Theatre during the year of 2015 when the celebration topic was “Clean Water”. This activity focused on issues of sustainability in fun, intimate and personal ways. The work focused on how the environment can shape identity and celebrate the remarkable recovery of Cleveland’s waterways. Another example is the play “Air Waves”, given in 2014, weaving sustainability themes into a story of loss, reckoning, forgiveness and honeybees. Generally, the cultural and creative sectors are very much used as resources to nurture a reverence for the environment and raise awareness about critical issues related to sustainability. More about how the Cleveland Public Theatre, Tri-C, and Inlet Dance Theatre have been using the performing arts to raise consciousness and inspire action around water can be seen in a video produced by the initiative (“New video: How performing arts advance sustainability”, 2016).

     

    3. The cultural and creative sectors themselves are the focus of sustainability action:

    Finally, the cultural and creative sectors themselves are also the focus for sustainable development and action. Obviously, challenges such as decreasing waste, avoiding toxic substances, and lowering energy consumption are relevant also within these sectors themselves. Gastronomy, in terms of “Local Food”, was furthermore chosen as the overall celebration topic of the initiative in 2012 which made this an area for considerable sustainable development actions. As a result, several accomplishments were, and are continuously, achieved related to gastronomy within the initiative (“Local Foods”, 2016).

  • 21. Lilja, Johan
    et al.
    Eriksson, Maria
    From problem to Attraction Detection Study (ADS): towards a new methodology for quality practice2010In: Electronic Proceedings, Cottbus, Germany, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Lilja, Johan
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Eriksson, Maria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Commercial experiences from a customer perspective: Elaborated, defined and distinguished2007In: Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Quality Management for Organisational and Regional Development, Lund 18-20/6 2007, Lund: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2007, , p. -Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A new type of business offering is currently gaining much attention, a type which in some aspects appears to be distinct from goods and services. These offerings are usually denoted as commercial experiences and are claimed to provide higher customer value than other types of offerings as they, for example, engage customers in an inherently memorable way. The understanding of what constitutes commercial experiences is however still scant. The purpose of this paper is accordingly to take a closer look at the commercial experience concept from a customer perspective. The paper aims specifically at elaborating and defining commercial experiences as well as distinguishing them from goods and services. Approach The paper is based on literature studies. Findings The authors identify memorable as the fundamental distinctive characteristic for commercial experiences. Memorable events are then shown to be strongly emotional events. Finally the two-factor structure of affect is used to show that the factor �strong engagement� is a critical driver of commercial experiences. As a result of the elaboration the authors also propose a new definition of commercial experiences and distinguish commercial experiences from goods and services in three ways. Originality/Value The paper increases the currently scant understanding of commercial experiences.

  • 23.
    Lilja, Johan
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Eriksson, Maria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Commercial experiences from a customer perspective elaborated, defined and distinguished2010In: The TQM Journal, ISSN 1754-2731, E-ISSN 1754-274X, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 285-292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - A new type of business offering is currently gaining much attention, a type which in some aspects appears to be distinct from goods and services. These offerings are usually denoted as commercial experiences and are claimed to provide higher customer value than other types of offerings as they, for example, engage customers in an inherently memorable way. The understanding of what constitutes commercial experiences is however still scant. The purpose of this paper is to take a closer look at the commercial experience concept from a customer perspective. The paper aims specifically at elaborating and defining commercial experiences as well as distinguishing them from goods and services. Design/methodology/approach - The paper is based on literature studies. Findings - The authors identify memorable as the fundamental distinctive characteristic for commercial experiences. Memorable events are then shown to be strongly emotional events. Finally the two-factor structure of affect is used to show that the factor "strong engagement" is a critical driver of commercial experiences. As a result of the elaboration the authors also propose a new definition of commercial experiences and distinguish commercial experiences from goods and services in three ways. Originality/value - The paper increases the currently scant understanding of commercial experiences.

  • 24.
    Lilja, Johan
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Hansen, David
    Resonans A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Fredrikson, Johan
    Amplify, Åre.
    Richardsson, Daniel
    Styrkebaserad.org, Östersund.
    Is Innovation the Future of Quality Management?: Searching for signs of quality and innovation management merging2017In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 9, no 3-4, p. 232-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Upcoming as well as mature industries are facing pressure as regards successfully managing operational excellence, and, at the same time, driving and managing innovation. Quality management concepts and practices’ ability to tackle this challenge have been questioned. It has even been suggested that there is a need to provide and promote an updated/changed, and even re-branded, version of Total Quality Management, merging quality management (QM) and innovation management (IM). Can such a shift then actually be spotted? The purpose of this paper is to explore and see if there are any signs suggesting that QM and IM actually are about to merge. Design/methodology/approach: The study is based on literature reviews, document studies and interviews. Findings: The paper highlights three signs indicating that QM and IM indeed are approaching each other, and that it is a movement driven from both sectors, e.g., in the work with new ISO-standards and the Toyota Kata framework. Originality/value: The indicated development has fundamental and extensive practical implications. It will for example have to be followed by a similar merging of the two fields in the educational system, and in the competences of future managers.

  • 25.
    Lilja, Johan
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Hansen, David
    Aalborg University Copenhagen.
    Fredrikson, Johan
    Amplify.
    Richardssson, Daniel
    Styrkebaserad.org.
    Is Innovation the Future of Quality Management?: Searching for signs of quality and innovation management merging in current practices and concepts2016In: Proceedings of the 19th QMOD Conference: Building a Culture for Quality, Innovation and Sustainability, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Currently, upcoming as well as mature industries are facing pressure as regards successfully managing operational excellence and continuous improvement, and at the same time driving and managing innovation. Quality management concepts and practices’ ability to tackle this challenge have been questioned and previous research even suggests that quality management initiatives can impede firms’ abilities to innovate and quickly adapt to changes. It has also been suggested that there is a need to provide and promote an updated/changed, and even re-branded, version of the Total Quality Management (TQM) concept, merging quality and innovation management. Such a shift would indeed be a fundamental and groundbreaking shift in the history of Quality Management so far. Can such a shift then actually be spotted? The purpose of this paper is to explore and see if there are any signs suggesting that quality and innovation management actually are about to merge.

    Approach

    The study is based on literature reviews, document studies, and interviews.

    Findings

    The paper highlights three signs indicating that quality and innovation management indeed are approaching each other, and that it is a movement driven from both sectors, e.g., in the work with new ISO-standards and the Toyota Kata framework.

    Relevance/contribution

    The indicated development has fundamental and extensive practical implications. It will for example have to be followed by a similar merging of the two fields in the educational system, and in the competences of future managers.

  • 26.
    Lilja, Johan
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Hansen, David
    Resonans A/S, Denmark.
    Richardsson, Daniel
    Styrkebaserad.org, Sweden.
    Design Questions for Life: Connecting Engineering Design, Appreciative Inquiry, and Other Question-based Models2015In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED, The Design Society, 2015, Vol. 11, p. 163-172Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Design for Life philosophy is an invitation to create new products, services, processes, and experiences that enhance human life. Research further suggests that a good life is qualitatively different than simply not having a bad life, and implies that the inquiry process during design is important.However, current engineering design approaches are not particularly clear as to which specific design questions should be used in the design process, and even less as to the role various design questions might play. Some of the current approaches even seem to use questions that inhibit Design for Life due to their strong emphasis on only solving deficiencies.This paper aims to highlight the unexplored potential of a more deliberate choice of design questions in the engineering design process. By mapping out four question-based design models and analyzing their differences in relation to the traditional engineering design process, an overview of design question types and their various sequences is produced. The analysis further highlights practical implications and potential gains when it coMES to choosing design questions more deliberately in the engineering design process.

  • 27.
    Lilja, Johan
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Snyder, Kristen
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Hedlund, Christer
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Metaphors: We Manage and Develop Quality by Screening and Elaborating on the Metaphors of Quality Management2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Metaphors are a powerful and human way of understanding and experiencing one kind of thing in terms of another. In Quality Management (QM) several metaphors are used to describe and bring to life the often abstract QM concepts and systems in clearer terms. These metaphors are undoubtedly of great importance for how QM is understood, communicated and practiced. They can also be assumed to have a significant impact on the perceived attractiveness of, and engagement in, QM systems. However, the metaphors of QM have seldom been systematically screened or put in focus, neither the topic of a critical discussion. The purpose of this paper is hence to contribute with a screening of the metaphors currently used, within QM literature and in practice among QM leaders, and then elaborate on their potential for improvement and development.

    Methodology/Approach: The paper is based on a literature review combined with interviews of QM leaders.

    Findings: The paper highlights that the current QM metaphors provide intuitive associations to properties such as stability, shelter, and structure but not to the important dynamic properties of QM, such as learning, or to the critical role of people in QM. It also provides suggestions for further improvements and development.

    Value of the Paper: The paper highlights the area of metaphors within QM as an important area for future research. It also provides insights concerning the successful use and selection of metaphors in future QM practice.

  • 28.
    Lilja, Johan
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Richardsson, Daniel
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building Engineering.
    Getting Over the Bridge: “Three Billy Goats Gruff” as a Metaphor for the Start and Development of an AI-Community of Practice in Mid Sweden2013In: AI practioner, ISSN 1741-8224, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 41-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two Swedish researchers and practitioners use a wellknown fairy tale to bring perspective to the start and development of an AI community in mid-Sweden. They decided to use the fairy tale of the Three Billy Goats Gruff as a base and metaphor for sharing their story.

  • 29.
    Lilja, Johan
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Richardsson, Daniel
    Putting Appreciative Design into Practice: A Case Study of a Course Evaluation and Design Process2012In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 4-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Appreciative Inquiry (AI) is an inquiry into the “best of” what already exists in a system. Applying AI at the start of a design process gives you a process that is very different from traditional design approaches. Simply put, you obtain a design process that has as its point of departure identified strengths: “the best of what is”. This is in sharp contrast to traditional design processes that typically starts from identified problems. You obtain a design process based on the best of what is, in other words you achieve “Appreciative Design”. The overall purpose of this paper is to explore and contribute to a process of putting Appreciative Design into practice. More specifically, the paper aims at introducing a process for Appreciative Design to be used in the development of higher education together with insights from applying it in practice.

    Methodology/approach

    The methodology chosen can be described as “action research”. The researchers have, in their role as educational leaders, developed and applied a process for Appreciative Design within the context of the entrepreneurial educational program “Skarp Åre - Business and product development” at Mid Sweden University.

    Findings

    The paper introduces a process for Appreciative Design to be used in the development of higher education together with insights from applying it in practice. The process introduced is referred to as Appreciative Course Evaluation and Design (ACED). Furthermore, applying the ACED process to the “Skarp Åre – Business and product development” educational program reveals a number of benefits in comparison to conventional practice. The benefits found include higher commitment by the course participants, lower risk in the design process, and increased student involvement in the evaluation and design process.

    Value of the paper

    The paper contributes in general to increasing the understanding of how the strengths and principles of Appreciative Inquiry can be incorporated into design processes. The case study performed also contributes new insights into how and why to apply the introduced ACED process to the evaluation and design of higher education. Our hope is that the insights presented will inspire future research and application of Appreciative Design not only to the evaluation and design of higher education, but also to the evaluation and design of products, services, organizations and society.

  • 30.
    Lilja, Johan
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Richardsson, Daniel
    Putting Appreciative Design into Practice: A Case Study of a Course Evaluation and Design Process2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Lilja, Johan
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Richardsson, Daniel
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Why is it Suddenly so Easy to Change?2015In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 7, no 2/3, p. 334-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to contribute with knowledge concerning how to drive, generate and energize change and development in social systems. A potential key to meet this challenge is the strength-based change management approach called appreciative inquiry (AI). A centralcomponent of AI is the “AI interview”, which has evolved into a distinct activity that enables the past and the future to be used as a generative source for on-going learning about strengths, opportunities,aspirations and results. The AI interview has in previous studies shown an often surprisingly high ability to generate development and change in social systems. However, the understanding of the generative “mystery” of the AI interview, focusing on the value experienced by both the people conducting the interview and those being interviewed, is still in need of further exploration. Furthermore, the evident generativity of the AI interview has not yet been integrated to any large extent into quality management. The purpose of this paper is to change that.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The researchers have studied the customer experience of conducting an AI interview based on feedback from 97 AI students at Mid Sweden University.

    Findings

    Among the results, eight categories of value are identified.

    Originality/value

    The paper contributes with new knowledge concerning the values experienced during participation in an AI interview. The paper also highlights ideas on how the generativity of the AI interview could be increasingly integrated into quality management.

  • 32.
    Lilja, Johan
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Snyder, Kristen
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Ahlin, Karin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Computer and System science.
    Persson Slumpi, Thomas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Computer and System science.
    Why Action Research and Quality Management is such a Nice Match: And How to Make them Dance without Falling2018In: Proceedings of the 21st QMOD conference: The Quality Movement, Where are we going ? - Past Present and Future, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    For anyone digging into the concepts, it becomes obvious that action research and quality management are a really nice match. They share many of their conceptual roots, intentions, core principles/dimensions and processes. Current best practice of quality management can even be understood as doing and strengthening action research processes, in terms of the Plan-do-study-act cycle (PDSA), in organizations. However, the choice, design and application of action research within quality management research is surprisingly seldom discussed or shared. The purpose of this paper is hence to elaborate on how action research and quality management are closely interrelated and how action research can be used more frequently and successfully in quality management research. In addition, the paper hopes to contribute to revitalizing what could be considered the most fundamental practice of quality management: the PDSA cycle.    

    Method

    The paper is based on a conceptual discussion combined with illustrative experiences and learnings from several research projects that have applied action research to develop the field of Quality Management. The projects and examples illustrate and share both experiences of dancing at its best and a few uncomfortable falls.

     

    Findings

    The paper identifies several critical factors to consider when designing and applying action research within quality management research. 

     

    Practical Implications

    As action research is defined by its double aim, developing both scientific knowledge and practice, the ability to successfully design and apply action research in quality management research has large practical implications. One obvious risk if this dance fails is that academic researchers draw back from practice and their ambitions of developing and contributing to practice in their research. The findings of the paper are hoped to increase the number of successful future applications of action research within quality management.

     

    Originality

    The study provide insights in an area sparsely discussed in previous academic work.

  • 33.
    Lilja, Johan
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Wiklund, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    A two-dimensional perspective on attractive quality2007In: Total Quality Management and Business Excellence, ISSN 1478-3363, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 667-679Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Attractive quality has for two decades been accentuated as a strong driver of loyalty, word-of-mouth and saleability. Recent elaborations of the concept of attractive quality however point to obstacles to the development of quality practices, such as engineering methods, to support the creation of attractive quality in practice. One obstacle is the lack of explanations as to why certain aspects of an offer are perceived as an attractive quality. There is a need to understand why attractive quality occurs. This paper aims to address these obstacles by presenting the results of a search for mechanisms claimed to cause attractive quality in literature. As a result, the paper identifies and relates two fundamentally different mechanisms considered important for the generation of attractive quality. The need-based roots of attractive quality point at an explanation in terms of the satisfaction of high-level needs. This is in sharp contrast to the currently dominant explanation of attractive quality as the exceeding of expectations. The two mechanisms are further distinguished and related to each other resulting in the classification of three different types of attractive quality. The three types are designated as 'Surprisers', 'Life Enrichers', and 'Attraction Boosters'. The 'Life Enrichers', which are defined as satisfying high-level needs of the customer, are highlighted as an important and promising area for future research.

  • 34.
    Lilja, Johan
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Wiklund, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Getting emotional about quality: questioning and elaborating the satisfaction concept2005In: Conference on Quality Management for Organisational and Regional Development, Palermo, 29 June – 1 July 2005: 8th QMOD Conference, 2005, , p. 905-916Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Lilja, Johan
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Wiklund, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Getting emotional about quality: questioning and elaborating the satisfaction concept2005In: The Asian Journal of Quality, ISSN 1598-2688, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 38-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Consumption has generally become more fragmented, hedonic and individual specific, satisfying not only functional but also emotional needs. In parallel, customer satisfaction is now thought to be both a cognitive and affective response, and the closely related concept of job satisfaction is commonly seen as an emotional reaction. The reasoning within quality management does, however, still lean heavily toward cognitive judgements (i.e. performance ratings), the emotional component clearly being under explored. Further, performance variables have shown not to be significant in predicting satisfaction for certain "experience products", the effect fully mediated by emotions. As a consequence a cognitive judgement based quality concept has lost its ability to predict satisfaction, which clearly contradicts with the modern quality definition, stressing quality as the ability to satisfy the customer. Emotions have however entered the quality discourse and it has been proposed that having customers that are merely feeling satisfied will not suffice. Instead, there has been a plethora of executive exhortations in the trade press calling on business to "delight the customer". Strategies for doing so have however usually been imprecise and unclear, and the different drivers of delight and satisfaction are not well explored. This paper aims to complement the previous cognitive dominance by exploring the multiple emotional responses involved in customer satisfaction. A conclusion being that we currently are measuring something, in terms of satisfied, that is more or less independent of what we aim for, in terms of delight. It is also most likely that - depending on the situation, product, and person � other positive and negative emotions are more important outcomes of purchase and usage than merely satisfaction. It is questioned whether a single, summary response such as satisfaction is feasible or even desirable.

  • 36.
    Lilja, Johan
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Wiklund, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Obstacles to the creation of attractive quality2006In: The TQM Journal, ISSN 0954-478X, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 55-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of the paper is to contribute to the solution, and understanding, of the current lack of activity concerning the development of practices, such as engineering methods, for the creation of attractive quality. The current situation is clearly problematic given the important positive effects assigned to attractive quality in the literature. Design/methodology/approach – First, different descriptions of attractive quality are examined in order to determine whether there is a common understanding of the concept. Second, the ability to manage attractive quality creation in accordance to a proactive ideal is approached by an examination of the current ability to predict the occurrence of attractive quality. Findings – Two obstacles that currently hinder the development of practices for attractive quality creation are identified. The first obstacle is the diversity of meanings given to the concept of attractive quality, resulting in confusion about what to obtain. The second obstacle identified is the current lack of valid explanations to the occurrence of attractive quality, resulting in an inability to develop proactive practices. Practical implications – The practical implications of bringing attention to, and overcoming, the two obstacles identified will potentially be substantial. A common attractive quality concept and valid explanations to the occurrence of attractive quality will constitute an essential base for the successful development of practices, such as engineering methods, for attractive quality creation. Originality/value – The paper contributes via the identification of two critical areas in need of intensified attention and future research in order to facilitate the sought-after development of practices for the creation of attractive quality.

  • 37.
    Lilja, Johan
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Wiklund, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.
    Quality Practice and External Customer Value: Critical reflections on the ideal linkage2005In: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Quality Management for Organisational and Regional Development : QMOD 2005, Palermo, Italien, 29.06.2005 - 01.07.2005., 2005, p. 281-292Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Lilja, Johan
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Wiklund, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    The need for re-understanding TQM: introducing the TQM Tree ModelManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Palm, Klas
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    From Reducing to Dynamically Managing Operational Deviations in the Service Sector: Towards Integrating Quality and Innovation Management in Practice by Ambidextrous Deviation Management (ADM)2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Defining “quality” as being inversely proportional to variability, and “quality improvements” as being the reduction of variability in processes and products, might now be a thing of the past. Even so, the history of the quality movement, with its strong focus on the elimination of deviations, continues to influence the thought and practice of modern quality management.

     However, we believe it is time for a more profound approach in both thought and practice when it comes to deviations, and especially when it comes to operational deviations in the service sector. Deviation does not per se have to be a foe, in some cases it is, on the contrary, a constructive friend. In fact, current research on organizational ambidexterity shows that long-term survival requires the ability to simultaneously exploit and explore. The organizations of the future hence need the ability to both dynamically reduce and at the same time increase deviations: the challenge is to know when to repress and when to encourage deviation. Something which is referred to here as ambidextrous deviation management.

    The aim of this paper is to elaborate conceptually and practically on the subject of how exploitation (being the traditional focus on quality management) and exploration (being a traditional focus of innovation management) could be integrated into the management of deviations and operations within service organizations.

    Value of the Paper

    The paper presents insights concerning how the need for organizational ambidexterity could be met by various approaches for dynamically managing and encouraging operational deviations in the service sector.

  • 40.
    Palm, Klas
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Key enabling factors for organizational ambidexterity in the public sector2017In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 2-20, article id IJQSS-04-2016-0038Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The capability of an organization to perform not only incremental quality improvements to the existing processes and products but also innovative or radical improvements that explore new opportunities is referred to as organizational ambidexterity. Research indicates that the long-term success of organizations demands a dynamic balancing of and excelling at both perspectives. However, there is considerably less clarity as regards how this can be achieved. The purpose of this paper is to empirically explore enabling factors for organizational ambidexterity in the public sector.

    Design/methodology/approach – This study is a qualitative study based on interviews with managers at two public organizations in Sweden. The analysis is conducted using a soft system methodology.

    Findings – Nine enabling factors for organizational ambidexterity are identi ed and presented in two pictures inspired by the Soft System Methodology. The study indicates that it above all is important to create leeway for exploration to achieve organizational ambidexterity in the public sector. The study strengthens the belief that some quality movement values and tools can be considered important, whereas others can counteract the ability to achieve organizational ambidexterity in public administration.

    Practical implications – Practitioners and scholars can use the identi ed enablers and the Soft System Methodology presented in this study to examine and develop the organizational ambidexterity of other public organizations. Originality/value – This study explores empirically the concept of ambidexterity in the public sector, a perspective that few previous scholars have studied. 

  • 41.
    Palm, Klas
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Towards Improving InnovAbility: Elaborating on the Ability to Measure Innovation Quality in Service Organizations2012In: Electronic Proceedings of the 15th QMOD Conference / [ed] S. Dahlgaard-Park, J. Dahlgaard, A. Hamrol, Comprint , 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    A frequent topic in quality management initiatives is measurement. The old saying “you get what you measure” is then used to reinforce interest in measurement. With this rhetoric, it isargued that proper measurement is a prerequisite for an organization’s ability to continuously improve. Simply put, without understanding “where you are”, and later “what you got“ as a result of your interventions, it is difficult to learn. In other words, you become unable to complete the improvement cycle, generally known as the PDCA-cycle (Plan, Do, Check, Act). This general logic of organizational learning is hard to argue against. It also illustrates the critical importance of finding “the right” organizational measurements that capture the quality of the desired result. So what measurements and evaluation tools should be used for improving one of the most essential activities of an organization, the activity known as innovation? That is a question asked in the  service industry today, and the question of interest in this paper. More specifically, this paper aims to contribute knowledge about and new perspectives on the measurement of innovation quality in service organizations.

    Methodology/Approach

    The paper is based on a literature review of the phenomenon of innovation quality in combination with an empirical study of public officials’  and managers’  perception and definition of innovation quality. The methodological approach for the empirical study is qualitative and carried out in the form of a desk review and interviews with staff at the Swedish International Development Agency (Sida) head office and at Swedish embassiesabroad.

    Findings

    The planning of monitoring and evaluation of the innovation process has to be done early in the innovation process. By defining the concept of innovation and the development of three types of quality indicators, innovation can be evaluated. Concepts and indicators have to bedesigned in context. It is not possible to rely on ready-made definitions. By following a five-step model in the cyclic process of measuring innovation quality, the PDCA cycle will be accomplished and the conditions for InnovAbility will improve.

    Value of the Paper

    The paper contributes to the understanding of how innovation quality can be measured, andthereby how the ability to innovate (InnovAbility) can be improved, in service organizations.

  • 42.
    Palm, Klas
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Wiklund, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Agencies, it’s Time to Innovate!: Exploring the current understanding of the Swedish government’s call for innovation2015In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 34-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Innovation is currently at the top of many agendas worldwide: not only in the private sector, but also when it comes to increasing quality, efficiency, and effectiveness in public administration. InSweden, this is reflected in the recent call from the Government for innovation in public management. However, innovation has not traditionally occurred to any significant extent on the strategic level of Swedish public management. Furthermore, governmental administration is a complex system in need of coordination and alignment for this new call to be effectively realized in practice.  

     

    The purpose of this paper is hence to explore the phenomenon of innovation in the current Swedish governmental administration system. More specifically, the paper explores the current understanding within the system of what innovation is, as well as why and how it should be achieved.

     

    Methodology/approach This study has been based on a qualitative approach with a case consisting of three embedded units: the Government itself, a ministry and a government agency. The data have been collected from documents and interviews.

     

    Findings

    The study shows that there is currently a notable disparity when it comes to how aspects of innovation are understood at different levels within the Swedish governmental administration system. Furthermore, the recent business development to increase the standardization of work processes is perceived as having created poorer preconditions for working with innovations.

     

    Practical implications

    The results highlight critical areas of disparity and possibilities for improvement towards a shared understanding and aligned innovation actions within the system.

     

    Originality/value

    The articlecontributes knowledgeabout the current understanding of innovation in the Swedish governmental administration system.

  • 43.
    Palm, Klas
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Wiklund, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    The challenge of integrating innovation and quality management practice2016In: Total Quality Management and Business Excellence, ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 7, no 1-2, p. 34-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following in the footsteps of ‘New Public Management’, where quality management and quality control have become widely implemented concepts among public authorities, there is now a subsequent government demand to also be innovative. However, integrating and achieving a balance between improved quality and increased innovation is not an easy task. Previous research indicates a complex and ambiguous relation, raising questions as to how to optimally combine these two approaches organisationally, operationally, and culturally. Is there an ‘edge of chaos’ where there is maximal flexibility for innovation while maintaining sufficient order for quality? The purpose of this paper is to examine the potential integration of innovation and quality management practice within the public sector. The paper is based on a multiple case study design, confronted with existing literature, and shows that the current quality management practice is perceived as being related to standardisation, leading to a decrease in the space for innovation. Second, that there is an expectation and belief that innovation and quality management can be handled in parallel and reinforce each other instead of being mutually detrimental.

  • 44.
    Stenmark, Petter
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Designing for the satisfaction of high-level needs: introducing the Ideation Need Mapping (INM) methodology2014In: The TQM Journal, ISSN 1754-2731, E-ISSN 1754-274X, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 639-649Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose– The purpose of this paper is to introduce a methodology that can support the process of understanding and designing for the satisfaction of high-level needs in practice. The satisfaction of high-level needs has seldom been in focus when it comes to customer satisfaction surveys or the process of new product or service development. However, needs do occur on various levels, and the satisfaction of high-level needs actually appears to have the greatest potential for the creation of loyalty among customers and customer satisfaction. The satisfaction of high-level needs has furthermore been pointed out as a strategy for the creation of attractive quality.Design/methodology/approach– The paper is based on literature studies and the application of the Ideation Need Mapping (INM) methodology in a specific case.Findings– The paper presents the INM methodology that could be used for guiding product and service innovation in practice. More specifically, the methodology supports the process of understanding and designing for the satisfaction of high-level needs.Originality/value– This paper aims to contribute to envisioning and demonstrating how the understanding of, and design for, satisfaction of high-level needs can be done in practice.

  • 45.
    Stenmark, Petter
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Exploring a new methodology for customer- involved ideation with a focus on high-level Needs2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Stenmark, Petter
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Exploring environmental labeling as a means of product differentiation in the outdoor industry2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Stenmark, Petter
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Hansen, David
    Resonans A/S.
    Using appreciative inquiry practices as a starting block for product innovation and development2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several organizational change cases using Appreciative Inquiry (AI) practices have shown potential for leaping into innovative organizational solutions. However, the applications are still scarce within product innovation and development. This paper investigates whether and how AI-practices can be used in such a context by presenting experiments with brainstorming teams. The results indicate that the brainstorming including AI practices generally provided the top rated ideas, the largest span of idea ratings, and the lowest median value of idea ratings, in comparison to the control team. Furthermore, the paper shows how AI-practices can be incorporated into a brainstorming process in practice.

  • 48.
    Zillinger, Malin
    et al.
    Lunds Universitet.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    The geography of team park mobility: interpretations of visitor tracks, experiences and methods2015In: Proceedings of Nordic Geographers Meeting, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Åslund, Anna
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Towards Capturing and Visualizing Value Creation: Exploring and Elaborating Attribute-Value Mapping2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose –The focus of all quality initiatives is value creation and the understanding of customer value. With that said, it is surprising how non-visual, and noticeably blunt, the current tools for capturing and visualizing customer value sometimes appear in practice. The purpose of this paper is hence to explore and elaborate the ability of capturing and visualizing value creation, setting out from a new marketing tool referred to as attribute-value mapping.

    Methodology/Approach – In order to fulfill the purpose of this paper, the attribute-value mapping tool has been applied, explored and elaborated as part of case studies within the area of societal entrepreneurship. The data have been collected as part of an annual course in societal entrepreneurship at Mid Sweden University.

    Findings – The paper illustrates how the attribute-value mapping tool can be elaborated and used to capture and visualize value creation in practice. It also highlights perceived benefits of the attribute-value mapping tool and possibilities for further applications and development of the tool.

    Value – The paper introduces and provides a practical example of a new tool for capturing and understanding customer value creation, and the attributes driving that value creation, in the quality management context. It is hoped to enable a more fruitful and accurate understanding and development of customer value within quality management, reaching from the entire organization to new product and new service development, various continuous improvement projects or the establishment of quality measurement systems.

     Keywords Customer value, value creation, societal entrepreneurship, social entrepreneurship, attribute-value mapping, quality management.

  • 50.
    Åslund, Anna
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Value Ripple Logic - Customer Value Creation from a System ViewIn: Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to contribute to reflective practices and models to support the understanding and creation of customer value from a system view.

    Approach

    Case studies have been performed and data have been mainly collected through interviews and documents but also through archival records, direct observations and participating observations. Collected data was studied from a system view by making rich picture maps inspired by soft systems methodology (Jackson, 2003; Checkland and Scholes, 1990). Maps were made for each societal entrepreneurial initiative studied. The findings were then compared with the concept of Service Logic and a development out of the Service Logic concept resulted in the Value Ripple Logic (VRL).

    Findings

    The findings shows the Value Ripple Logic and an explanation of the concept. It includes a lexicon, a method to map and analyse customer value creation, an empirical example of customer value creation in a societal entrepreneurial initiative and a metaphor that describes customer value creation from a system view.

    Value

    VRL captures and illustrates customer value creation beyond a classical provider-customer relation and creates possibilities for understanding and analysing customer value creation from a system view. Which makes it possible to better understand the social, societal and environmental impact of an organization or initiative from a larger perspective.

    Article Classification

    Case study

1 - 50 of 50
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf