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  • 1.
    Pagaduan, Jeffrey
    et al.
    College of Human Kinetics, University of the Philippines.
    Pojskic, Haris
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Babajic, Fuad
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Uzicanin, Edin
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Muratovic, Melika
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Tomljanovic, Mario
    School of Kinesiology, University of Split.
    Acute effects of loaded whole body vibration schemes on countermovement jump, speed and agility2013In: Turkish Journal of Sport and Exercise, ISSN 2147-5652, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 56-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of loaded whole body static squat exercise during whole body vibration and non-vibration schemes on countermovement jump (CMJ), speed and agility. Twenty-one healthy male college football players (age: 20.14 ± 1.65 years; body height: 179.9 ± 8.34 cm; body mass: 74.4 ± 13.0 kg; % body fat: 9.45 ± 4.8) participated in the study. They underwent a standardized general warm-up and dynamic stretching followed by randomized loaded protocols executed for 5 minutes with a rest interval of 30 seconds. These included static squat with 30% bodyweight external load (ST + 30%), ST + 30% on a vibration platform at 25 Hz and 2 mm (WBV25), and  ST + 30% on a vibration platform at 50 Hz and 4mm. Measurement of  CMJ, 15 m sprint and modified agility tests followed the warm-up protocol. One way repeated measures ANOVA revealed a significant difference on CMJ performance, F(2,40) = 24.5, partial Î·2 =  .551, p < 0.01. Bonferonni post hoc showed that ST+30% posted significantly lower CMJ than WBV25 and WBV50. CMJ at WBV50 was higher than WBV25. There was a significant difference on speed, F(2, 40) = 23.6, partial η2  = .542, p < 0.01. Post hoc determined that ST+30% was significantly slower than WBV25 and WBV50. WBV50 was faster than WBV25. There was a significant difference in the agility among interventions, F(2, 40) = 18.2, partial η2 = .477, p < 0.01. ST+30% agility time was significantly higher compared to WBV25 and WBV50.  In conclusion, WBV50 posted the greatest benefits in CMJ, speed and agility.

  • 2.
    Pagaduan, Jeffrey
    et al.
    College of Human Kinetics, University of the Philippines.
    Pojskic, Haris
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Uzicanin, Edin
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Babajic, Fuad
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Effect of Various Warm-Up Protocols on Jump Performance in College Football Players2012In: Journal of Human Kinetics, ISSN 1640-5544, E-ISSN 1899-7562, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 127-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of warm-up strategies on countermovement jump performance. Twenty-nine male college football players (age: 19.4 ± 1.1 years; body height: 179.0 ± 5.1 cm; body mass: 73.1 ± 8.0 kg; % body fat: 11.1 ± 2.7) from the Tuzla University underwent a control (no warm-up) and different warm-up conditions: 1. general warm-up; 2. general warm-up with dynamic stretching; 3. general warm-up, dynamic stretching and passive stretching; 4. passive static stretching; 5. passive static stretching and general warm-up; and, 6. passive static stretching, general warm-up and dynamic stretching. Countermovement jump performance was measured after each intervention or control. Results from one way repeated measures ANOVA revealed a significant difference on warm-up strategies at F (4.07, 113.86) = 69.56, p < 0.001, eta squared = 0.72. Bonferonni post hoc revealed that a general warm-up and a general warm-up with dynamic stretching posted the greatest gains among all interventions. On the other hand, no warm-up and passive static stretching displayed the least results in countermovement jump performance. In conclusion, countermovement jump performance preceded by a general warmup or a general warm-up with dynamic stretching posted superior gains in countermovement jump performance.

  • 3.
    Pojskic, Haris
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Erik, Åslin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Krolo, Ante
    Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Split, Split, Croatia.
    Jukic, Ivan
    Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.
    Uljevic, Ognjen
    Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Split, Split, Croatia.
    Spasic, Miodrag
    Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Split, Split, Croatia.
    Sekulic, Damir
    Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Split, Croatia.
    Importance of Reactive Agility and Change of Direction Speed in Differentiating Performance Levels in Junior Soccer Players: Reliability and Validity of Newly Developed Soccer-Specific Tests2018In: Frontiers in Physiology, ISSN 1664-042X, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 9, no MAY, article id 506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Agility is a significant determinant of success in soccer; however, studies have rarely presented and evaluated soccer-specific tests of reactive agility (S_RAG) and non-reactive agility (change of direction speed – S_CODS) or their applicability in this sport. The aim of this study was to define the reliability and validity of newly developed tests of the S_RAG and S_CODS to discriminate between the performance levels of junior soccer players. The study consisted of 20 players who were involved at the highest national competitive rank (all males; age: 17.0 0.9 years), divided into three playing positions (defenders, midfielders, and forwards) and two performance levels(U17 and U19). Variables included body mass (BM), body height, body fat percentage,20-m sprint, squat jump, countermovement jump, reactive-strength-index, unilateral jump, 1RM-back-squat, S_CODS, and three protocols of S_RAG. The reliabilities of theS_RAG and S_CODS were appropriate to high (ICC: 0.70 to 0.92), with the strongest reliability evidenced for the S_CODS. The S_CODS and S_RAG shared 25–40% of the common variance. Playing positions significantly differed in BM (large effect-size differences [ES]; midfielders were lightest) and 1RM-back-squat (large ES; lowest results in midfielders). The performance levels significantly differed in age and experience in soccer; U19 achieved better results in the S_CODS (t-test: 3.61, p < 0.05, large ES)and two S_RAG protocols (t-test: 2.14 and 2.41, p < 0.05, moderate ES). Newly developed tests of soccer-specific agility are applicable to differentiate U17 and U19players. Coaches who work with young soccer athletes should be informed that the development of soccer-specific CODS and RAG in this age is mostly dependent on training of the specific motor proficiency.

  • 4.
    Pojskic, Haris
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Linnaeus Univ, Kalmar.
    Eslami, Bahareh
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Relationship Between Obesity, Physical Activity, and Cardiorespiratory Fitness Levels in Children and Adolescents in Bosnia and Herzegovina: An Analysis of Gender Differences2018In: Frontiers in Physiology, ISSN 1664-042X, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 9, article id 1734Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to examine: (i) the level of physical activity (PA), obesity indices and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) among boys and girls in primary school, and (ii) to determine the association of obesity indices and PA with CRF for the total number of participants, and then separately for boys and girls. 753 sixth to ninth grade girls and boys aged 10-14 years took part in this cross-sectional study. The PA was assessed by the "Physical Activity Questionnaire - Children" and CRF was assessed by the Maximal multistage a 20 m shuttle run test. Body mass index (BMI), waist circumferences (WC), and waist to height ratio (WHtR) were considered as obesity indices. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to explore correlates of CRF. The results obtained showed the prevalence of general overweight and obesity was 25.5% in our sample which was lower than that in the regional estimate (e.g., similar to 28%) for Eastern Europe. Among all participants, CRF was associated with male sex, older age, a lower WC percentile, higher WHtR, and higher level of PA. The model accounted for 24% of the variance. CRF was associated with older age and higher level of PA among girls and boys. Lower WC percentile was a significant determinant of CRF among boys. In conclusion, general overweight/obesity was not independently associated with CRF. Those with better CRF were more likely to be male and older, had a higher level of PA and lower central adiposity. These findings emphasize the importance of supporting school age children to take a part in programmed physical activity regardless of their body composition.

  • 5.
    Pojskic, Haris
    et al.
    University of Tuzla.
    Levic, Edvina
    University of Tuzla, School of Physical Education and Sports.
    Proprioception Training: Before Or After Regular Basketball Training Session?2015In: 20th annual Congress of the European college of sport science 24th - 27th June 2015, Malmö – Sweden: Book of abstracts / [ed] Radmann, A., Hedenborg, S., Tsolakidis, E., European College of Sport Science , 2015, Vol. 20, p. 424-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction It is a common practice among strength and conditioning coaches to conduct proprioception training before a regular training session when athletes are in a rested state, but it is known that the majority of injuries occurred at the end of the training session, or competition, when athletes are fatigued (Hawkins and Fuller, 1999). Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of basketball training on single-leg balance ability in rested and fatigued state and assess whether the efficiency of a proprioception program is affected by its performance before or after a regular basketball training. Methods Thirty-three female basketball players were randomly divided into three subgroups (n=11 each). Experimental groups E1 and E2 performed the same proprioception program (8 weeks, 3 times per week, 15-20 minutes per session), but E1 performed before, and E2 after regular basketball training session. A control group performed only the regular basketball training. The Biodex Balance System was used to assess single-leg balance ability, overall stability index (OSI) prior to the utilization of the program (in a rested and fatigued state), as well as after the program. General fatigue was induced by the beep test protocol. Two separate 3-way repeated measures ANOVA (time x group x condition) and multiple pairwise comparisons were used to test the differences in the single-leg balance ability between and within the groups pre- and post-proprioception program,and to determine if the timing of the proprioception training (pre-training vs. post-training) affected the balance ability in rested and fatigued state. Results The enhancement in single-leg balance ability for both dominant and non-dominant leg was higher in the experimental groups than in the control group (> 15%). Greater improvement was in a dominant leg’s OSI in the fatigued and non-fatigued state in E2 group. E1 group showed similar improvement in the rested state for non-dominant leg compared to E2 group. Discussion We found that a basketball training improved single-leg ability, but greater enhancement was observed when the proprioception training was added. Additionally, we found that the post-training proprioception program positively affected balance ability in the rested and fatigued state. These findings are in accordance with Gioftsidou et al. (2006). It seems that training in the fatigued state (post-training) has a positive transfer on single-leg ability in the fatigued state, so it is recommended to conduct it after a training session or after exhausting exercises.

  • 6.
    Pojskic, Haris
    et al.
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Pagaduan, Jeffrey
    College of Human Kinetics, University of the Philippines.
    Babajic, Fuad
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Uzicanin, Edin
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Muratovic, Melika
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Tomljanovic, Mario
    School of Kinesiology, University of Split.
    Acute effects of prolonged intermittent low-intensity isometric warm-up schemes on jump, sprint, and agility performance in collegiate soccer players2015In: Biology of Sport, ISSN 0860-021X, E-ISSN 2083-1862, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 129-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of different warm-up interventions on jump, sprint and agility performance in collegiate soccer players. Twenty-one healthy male college soccer players (age: 20.14 ± 1.65 years; body height: 179.9 ± 8.34 cm; body mass: 74.4 ± 13.0 kg; % body fat: 9.45 ± 4.8) participated in the study. Subjects underwent four different randomized warm-up protocols separated by at least 48 hours. The warm-up schemes were: 1. no conditioning contraction protocol (NCC); 2. dynamic stretching (DS); 3. prolonged intermittent low-intensity isometric exercise (ST); and, 4. ST with an additional external load equal to 30% of body weight (ST + 30% BW). All interventions were preceded by a general warm-up. Results from one-way repeated measures ANOVA demonstrated a significant difference in countermovement jump (CMJ) at F(3,60) = 10.2, ηρ² = 0.337, p < 0.01. Post hoc analysis revealed a significant difference in CMJ performance in DS when compared to NCC and ST + 30% BW. No significant difference in CMJ was observed between DS and ST. CMJ scores in NCC, ST, and ST + 30% BW were non-significant. There was a significant difference in speed; F(3, 60) = 6.61, ηρ² = 0.248, p < 0.01. Post hoc analysis revealed significantly better time in DS than NCC and ST. However, no difference in speed was observed between DS and ST + 30% BW. Similarly, speed was similar in NCC, ST and ST + 30% BW. A significant difference in agility performance was also observed; F(3, 60) = 24.1, ηρ²= 0.546, p < 0.01. Post hoc analysis revealed significantly greater performance gains in DS than NCC. No significant difference in agility was observed in DS, ST and ST + 30% BW. In conclusion, a prolonged intermittent low-intensity isometric protocol using bodyweight only showed similar benefits with dynamic stretching in countermovement jump performance. When the same isometric condition with additional load equal to 30% of bodyweight was applied, effects in speed and agility were similar to dynamic stretching.

  • 7.
    Pojskic, Haris
    et al.
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Pagaduan, Jeffrey
    College of Human Kinetics, University of the Philippines.
    Uzicanin, Edin
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Babajic, Fuad
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Muratovic, Melika
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Tomljanovic, Mario
    School of Kinesiology, University of Split.
    Acute Effects of Loaded Whole Body Vibration Training on Performance2015In: Asian journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 2008-000X, E-ISSN 2008-7209, Vol. 6, no 1, article id e24054Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The application of whole body vibration (WBV) as a warm-up scheme has been receiving an increasing interest among practitioners.

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of loaded and unloaded WBV on countermovement jump, speed and agility.

    Patients and Methods: Twenty-one healthy male college football players (age: 20.14 ± 1.65 years; body height: 179.9 ± 8.34 cm; body mass: 74.4 ± 13.0 kg; % body fat: 9.45 ± 4.8) underwent randomized controlled trials that involved standing in a half squat position (ST), ST with 30% of bodyweight (ST + 30%), whole body vibration at f = 50 Hz, A = 4 mm (WBV), and WBV with 30% bodyweight (WBV + 30% BW) after a standardized warm-up. Post measures of countermovement jump, 15-m sprint, and modified t-test were utilized for analyses.

    Results: One way repeated measures ANOVA revealed a significant difference in the countermovement jump performance, F (3, 60 = 9.06, η2 = 2.21, P = 0.000. Post-hoc showed that WBV + 30% BW posted significant difference compared to (P = 0.008), ST + 30% BW (P = 0.000) and WBV (P = 0.000). There was also a significant difference in the sprint times among interventions, F (3, 60) = 23.0, η2 = 0.865, P = 0.000. Post hoc showed that WBV + 30% BW displayed significantly lower time values than ST (P = 0.000), ST + 30% BW (P = 0.000) and WBV (P = 0.000). Lastly, there was a significant difference in the agility performance across experimental conditions at F(2.01, 40.1) = 21.0, η2 = 0.954, P = 0.000. Post hoc demonstrated that WBV have lower times than ST (P = 0.013). Also, WBV + 30% BW posted lower times compared to ST (P = 0.000), ST + 30% (P = 0.000) and WBV (P = 0.003).

    Conclusions: Additional external load of 30% bodyweight under WBV posted superior gains in countermovement jump, speed and agility compared to unloaded WBV, loaded non-WBV and unloaded non-WBV interventions.

  • 8.
    Pojskic, Haris
    et al.
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Separovic, Vlatko
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Muratovic, Melika
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Uzicanin, Edin
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Morphological Differences of Elite Bosnian Basketball Players According to Team Position2014In: International Journal of Morphology, ISSN 0717-9367, E-ISSN 0717-9502, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 690-694Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this research was the estimation of anthropometric characteristics of elite male basketball players from four Bosnian first league teams, as well as the identification of possible differences between players who play in different positions in the teams. Fifty-five, healthy players (age: 19.09±3.13 years; body height: 189.13±8.30 cm; body mass: 83.42±12.48 kg) were divided into three different subsamples according to their positional role (twenty two guards, nineteen forwards and fourteen centers). Twenty morphological variables were measured and afterwards one (BMI) was calculated. For all anthropometric characteristics, descriptive parameters (mean, standard deviation and range) were calculated. In order to determine the possible differences between the players that play in different positions in the teams the analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Bonferoni post-hoc test for multiple comparisons was used. The results obtained show that there are significant differences between the different groups of players in sixteen out of twenty-one measured variables. Centers (big players) are dominantly heavier, taller, with longer and wider skeletons dimensionality as well as with bigger body circumferences compared to forwards and guards. Forwards are significantly heavier and taller with longer leg and arm lengths compared to guards. There are no significant differences between the groups in terms of body fat percentage, fat free percentage, body mass index and biepicondylar breadth of the femur and humerus. Generally, the values of the measured variables rise from guards to centers, except for body fat percentage and skinfolds. The obtained information can help coaches to indirectly evaluate fitness levels of the players and to design training and nutritional programs for basketball players.

  • 9.
    Pojskic, Haris
    et al.
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Separovic, Vlatko
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Muratovic, Melika
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Uzicanin, Edin
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    The relationship between physical fitness and shooting accuracy of professional basketball players2014In: Motriz: Revista de Educacao Fisica, ISSN 1980-6574, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 408-417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationships among physical fitness of professional Bosnianbasketball players (n = 38) and shooting accuracy during one basketball season. A related, secondary aim was toexamine relationships between basketball shooting assessments and competitive shooting accuracy during game play.Physical fitness components included: muscular endurance and aerobic endurance, lower and upper-body power,speed, agility, anaerobic capacity and anaerobic power. The specific basketball shooting accuracy was assessed bystationary and dynamic shooting assessments. Competitive shooting accuracy was represented by data collected duringone basketball season for each player (free throw, field goal, and three-point %). Results of the regression analysesshowed that there were significant positive relationships among shooting assessments and competitive shooting accuracyduring game play. The relationship was stronger when the dynamic shooting tests were applied compared tothe stationary tests. However, few or weak relationships existed among physical fitness components and competitiveshooting accuracy. Only the power tests showed to be good predictors for shooting over longer distances. The findingssupport the inclusion of the dynamic basketball shooting accuracy tests in regular basketball assessment proceduresas a valuable testing instrument.

  • 10.
    Pojskic, Haris
    et al.
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Separovic, Vlatko
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Uzicanin, Edin
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Differences between successful and unsuccessful basketball teams on the final Olympic tournament2009In: Acta Kinesiologica, ISSN 1840-2976, E-ISSN 1840-3700, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 110-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to find out global quantitative differences between successful and unsuccessful teams, which had played on the Olympic basketball tournament, in twenty two standard and derived statistical indicators of situational efficiency. The research was performed on the sample of 37 matches, so that 74 different statistical samples have been included in analysis. Data were collected by means of statistics patterns provided by official FIBA web site www.fiba.com. A discriminative analysis has been conducted in order to track down possible differences between two groups of the teams. One statistically significant discriminative function has been obtained. The values of canonical correlation are pretty high, which is to say that the 22 statistical parameters make very good difference between successful and unsuccessful teams, but also that there were big differences between the groups. The obtained results show that assists, parameters of shooters’ field goal efficiency, defensive rebound and number of points made by bench players are variables that make the most significant difference between victorious and defeated teams. The reason for big differences between the victorious and defeated national teams that participated on the final Olympic basketball tournament in Beijing is probably because they highly differentiated in technical, tactical and physical conditioning, what is conditioned by participation of various quality national teams that come from different continents and countries, where basketball leagues are not so good.

  • 11.
    Pojskic, Haris
    et al.
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Separovic, Vlatko
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Uzicanin, Edin
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Modelling home advantage in basketball at different levels of competition2011In: Acta Kinesiologica, ISSN 1840-2976, E-ISSN 1840-3700, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 25-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to find out if there were any differences between the home and road basketballteams that played in three different levels of competition, in nineteen standard and derived statisticalindicators of situational efficiency. The home and road teams from NLB-Adriatic league, Euroleague–regularseason and Euroleague-Top 16 were analysed. Three discriminant analyses have been conducted in order totrack down possible differences between the home and road teams in game stats. Obtained results show thedifferences in game related statistics between the home and road teams from NLB and Euroleague (regularseason) competition. Home teams are characterised by higher number of assists, steals, points and pointsscored by the starting five, while the road teams have more turnovers. This points to aggressive defensiveand offensive tactics of the home teams. There were no statistically significant differences between thehome and road teams played in Euroleague-Top 16. As the quality of competition becomes stronger, theadvantage of home court becomes less dominant. In other words, when the quality of teams is pretty equal,home advantage is low and does not have a dominant and crucial role in winning games.

  • 12.
    Pojskic, Haris
    et al.
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Separovic, Vlatko
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Uzicanin, Edin
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Reliability and factorial validity of basketball shooting accuracy tests2011In: Sport Scientific And Practical Aspects, ISSN 1840-4413, E-ISSN 1840-4561, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 25-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to determine reliability and factorial validity of six basketball shooting accuracy tests. Fifty five healthy basketball players (age 19.1 ± 3.1 years; body mass 83.4 ± 12.5 kg; height 189.1 ± 8.2 cm; body fat percentage 13.1 ± 4.1) from four Bosnian basketball teams participated in this research. The applied tests have been constructed in order to measure basketball shooting accuracy from three different distances and under different intensity loads. The standard statistical parameters were calculated for each trial of all six basketball shooting tests (arithmetic mean, standard deviation and range). The average intertrial correlation coefficients (AVR), interclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and Cronbach’s alpha reliability coefficients (α) were used to determine the between-subject reliability of basketball shooting tests. The within-subject variation for the tree tests was determined by calculating the coefficient of variation (CV). In order to determine the factorial validity of six basketball shooting tests, an intercorrelation matrix of the six tests was factorized using a principal component factor analysis. Structurally and physiologically more demanding tests performed from longer distances, produced higher variation in the applied tests. The most reliable tests are those that were performed from short distances in physiologically and structurally less demanding conditions. Results showed that all six tests have a similar measurement goal, that is to say basketball shooting accuracy, but they do not measure the same aspects of basketball shooting accuracy. As reliable and valid instruments, the tests can be used in future studies, but also can help coaches to evaluate players’ accuracy in more realistic conditions, or to use the tests as training drills for improving basketball accuracy and players’ fitness.

  • 13.
    Pojskic, Haris
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Separovic, Vlatko
    Tuzla Univ, Sch Phys Educ & Sport, Tuzla, Bosnia & Hercegovina.
    Uzicanin, Edin
    Ctr Sports Excellence, Tuzla, Bosnia & Herceg.;Tuzla Univ, Sch Phys Educ & Sport, Tuzla, Bosnia & Hercegovina.
    Muratovic, Melika
    Ctr Sports Excellence, Tuzla, Bosnia & Herceg.;Tuzla Univ, Sch Phys Educ & Sport, Tuzla, Bosnia & Hercegovina.
    Mackovic, Samir
    Tuzla Univ, Sch Phys Educ & Sport, Tuzla, Bosnia & Hercegovina.
    Positional Role Differences in the Aerobic and Anaerobic Power of Elite Basketball Players2015In: Journal of Human Kinetics, ISSN 1640-5544, E-ISSN 1899-7562, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 219-227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to compare the aerobic and anaerobic power and capacity of elite male basketball players who played multiple positions. Fifty-five healthy players were divided into the following three different subsamples according to their positional role: guards (n = 22), forwards (n = 19) and centers (n = 14). The following three tests were applied to estimate their aerobic and anaerobic power and capacities: the countermovement jump (CMJ), a multistage shuttle run test and the Running-based Anaerobic Sprint Test (RAST). The obtained data were used to calculate the players' aerobic and anaerobic power and capacities. To determine the possible differences between the subjects considering their different positions on the court, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with the Bonferroni post-hoc test for multiple comparisons was used. The results showed that there was a significant difference between the different groups of players in eleven out of sixteen measured variables. Guards and forwards exhibited greater aerobic and relative values of anaerobic power, allowing shorter recovery times and the ability to repeat high intensity, basketball-specific activities. Centers presented greater values of absolute anaerobic power and capacities, permitting greater force production during discrete tasks. Coaches can use these data to create more individualized strength and conditioning programs for different positional roles.

  • 14.
    Pojskic, Haris
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. The Swedish Winter Sports Research Centre.
    Sisic, Nedim
    Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Split.
    Separovic, Vlatko
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Sekulic, Damir
    Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Split.
    Association between conditioning capacities and shooting performance in professional basketball players; an analysis of stationary and dynamic shooting skills: Predictors of shooting performance in basketball2018In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, ISSN 1064-8011, E-ISSN 1533-4287, Vol. 32, no 7, p. 1981-1992Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about the influence of conditioning capacities on shooting performance in basketball. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between different conditioning capacities and shooting performance in professional basketball players. In this investigation, we examined 38 males (all perimeter players; height: 185.5+/-6.73 cm; mass: 78.66+/-10.35 kg). Conditioning capacities were evaluated by tests of muscular-strength, aerobic-endurance, jumping- and throwing-capacities, sprinting-speed, pre-planned-agility, anaerobic-endurance and fatigue-resistance. Shooting performance was evaluated using game statistics, as well as six tests of shooting-performance performed in controlled settings: (i) three tests of static (i.e., non-fatigued) shooting-performance (standardized execution of one- (S1), two- (S2) and three-point shots (S3) in stationary conditions), and (ii) three tests of dynamic (i.e., fatigued) shooting-performance (standardized execution of one- (D1), two- (D2), and three-point shots (D3) in dynamic conditions). All three dynamic shooting tests and the S1 test were significantly (p<0.05) correlated with corresponding game statistics. Multiple regression indicated that conditioning capacities were significantly related to D1 (R2=0.36; p=0.03), D2 (R2=0.44; p=0.03), S3 (R2=0.41; p=0.02) and D3 (R2=0.39; p=0.03) tests. Players with a higher fatigue-resistance achieved better results on D1 test ([beta]=-0.37, p=0.03). Pre-planned-agility ([beta]=-0.33, p=0.04), countermovement jump ([beta]=0.42, p=0.03) and fatigue-resistance ([beta]=-0.37, p=0.02) were significant predictors of D2 performance. The countermovement jump ([beta]=0.39, p=0.04), medicine ball toss ([beta]=0.34, p=0.04) and anaerobic-endurance ([beta]=0.46, p=0.04) predicted the results of D3 performance. Jumping, throwing and anaerobic endurance capacities were good determinants of the skill of dynamic shooting over a long distance. These findings emphasize the importance of explosive power and anaerobic-capacity as determinants of shooting-performance in high-level basketball players.

  • 15.
    Sekulic, Damir
    et al.
    Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Split, Croatia.
    Sisic, Nedim
    Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Split, Croatia.
    Terzic, Admir
    Faculty of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina.
    Jasarevic, Indira
    Faculty of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina.
    Ostojic, Ljerka
    Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Split, Croatia.
    Pojskic, Haris
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Zenic, Natasa
    Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Split, Croatia.
    Sport and scholastic factors in relation to smoking and smoking initiation in older adolescents: a prospective cohort study in Bosnia and Herzegovina2017In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 7, no 3, article id e014066Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Sport and scholastic factors are known to be associated with cigarette smoking in adolescence, but little is known about the causality of this association. The aim of this study was to prospectively explore the relationships of different sport and scholastic factors with smoking prevalence initiation in older adolescents from Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    Methods: In this 2-year prospective cohort study, there were 872 adolescent participants (16 years at baseline; 46% females). The study consisted of baseline tests at the beginning of the third year (September 2013) and follow-up at the end of the fourth year of high school (late May to early June 2015). The independent variables were scholastic and sport-related factors. The dependent variables were (1) smoking at baseline, (2) smoking at follow-up and (3) smoking initiation over the course of the study. Logistic regressions controlling for age, gender and socioeconomic status were applied to define the relationships between independent and dependent variables.

    Results: School absence at the baseline study was a significant predictor of smoking initiation during the course of the study (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1 to 1.8). Those who reported quitting sports at baseline showed an increased risk of smoking at the end of the study (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1 to 2.0) and of smoking initiation (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.3 to 2.0). Adolescents who reported lower competitive achievements in sport were at a higher risk of (1) smoking at baseline (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1 to 2.1), (2) smoking at follow-up (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1 to 2.1) and (3) smoking initiation (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1 to 2.6).

    Conclusions: In developing accurate antismoking public health policies for older adolescents, the most vulnerable groups should be targeted. The results showed that most participants initiated smoking before 16 years of age. Therefore, further investigations should evaluate the predictors of smoking in younger ages.

  • 16.
    Tan, Isabel Joyce L
    et al.
    College of Human Kinetics, University of the Philippines .
    Cua, Michelle H
    College of Human Kinetics, University of the Philippines .
    Pagaduan, Jeffrey
    College of Human Kinetics, University of the Philippines.
    Pojskic, Haris
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Uzicanin, Edin
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Babajic, Fuad
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    The Influence Of Rest Intervals on Countermovement Jump performances Following Low-intensity loaded Countermovement jumps2013In: Kinesiologia Slovenica, ISSN 1318-2269, E-ISSN 2232-4062, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 28-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to determine the influence of varying rest intervals on countermovement jump (CMJ) performances following low-intensity loaded countermovement jumps (LCMJs). Twenty-nine collegiate football players (age: 19.4 ± 1.1 years; height: 179.0 ± 5.1 cm; weight: 73.1 ± 8.0) from Tuzla University volunteered to participate in the study. They performed ten LCMJs using 15% of their 1 repetition maximum (1RM) squat. The subjects then executed a CMJ every 2 minutes until a total of 6 jumps had been completed. One-way repeated measures ANOVA showed significant differences in countermovement jump heights at various rest intervals, F(2.23, 62.3) = 40.5, p < 0.01, ηρ2 = .591. A Bonferroni post hoc test revealed that the CMJs performed after 4 minutes (CMJ, standard deviation = 39.5, 4.38 cm) were superior among all pairwise comparisons after 10 LCMJs. In conclusion, the low-intensity LCMJs performed by the college football players led to the highest CMJ performances 4 minutes after the LCMJs.

  • 17.
    Uljevic, Ognjen
    et al.
    University of Split; Faculty of Kinesiology; Split; Croatia.
    Pehar, Miran
    University of Mostar; Faculty of Natural Sciences Mathematics and Education; Mostar; Bosnia and Herzegovina.
    Pojskic, Haris
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Spasic, Miodrag
    University of Split, Faculty of Kinesiology, Split, Croatia.
    Sekulic, Damir
    Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Split, Croatia.
    A Total Sample Vs. Playing-Position Approach To Identifying Relationships Between Different Agility Components In Basketball2017In: 11th International Conference on Kinanthropology: Sport and Quality of Life, Brno, Czech Republic, 2017, Vol. 11, p. 55-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Non-planned agility (reactive agility - RAG), and pre-planned agility (change of direction speed- CODS) are important determinants of success in basketball. However, the association between these two conditioning capacities in high-level basketball players is rarely evidenced. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the relationship between basketball-specific CODS and RAG in the total sample, and separately for three main playing positions in the game of basketball (i.e. guards, forwards and centers).

    Methods: The sample comprised 106 national/international-level male basketball players (age:21.9±3.5 years; body height: 195.1±7.9 cm; body mass: 90.1±10.0 kg), divided according to their playing positions in game (guards, N = 49; forwards, N = 22; centers, N = 35). The variables included body mass, body height, and body fat percentage; as well as basketball-specific CODS and -RAG. The reliability of CODS and RAG was evidenced by intra-class-coefficients (ICC). Differences among positions were established by one-way analysis of variance, consecutive post-hoc analyses, and effect size differences (η2). Finally, the relationship between variables was established by means of Pearson’s moment correlation coefficient (r), which was calculated for the total sample, and then separately for each playing position.

    Results: The intra-session reliability was somewhat higher for CODS, than for RAG (ICC: 0.81 and 0.76, respectively). The centers were tallest (F: 67.75, p < 0.01; η2: 0. 57), and heaviest (F: 39.01, p < 0.01,η2: 0.44), followed by forwards. The guards and forwards achieved better results than centers in CODS(F: 5.19, p < 0.01; η2: 0.09), and RAG (F: 3.85, p < 0.05; E η2: 0.07). When observed for the total sample, the CODS and RAG shared 49% of common variance (r: 0.70). When calculated for playing positions, the highest correlation between CODS and RAG was evidenced for centers (r: 0.81), then for forwards(r: 0.71), and guards (r: 0.51).

    Conclusion: Relatively strong correlations between CODS and RAG among forwards and centers implies the possibility of simultaneous strength and conditioning of these capacities for these two playing positions. Meanwhile, because of the small common variance, separate training for RAG and CODS is warranted for guards. The study highlights the necessity of a position-specific approach to evidencing determinants of sport-specific conditioning qualities for high-level players.

  • 18.
    Zenic, Natasa
    et al.
    Univ Split, Fac Kinesiol, Split, Croatia..
    Ostojic, Ljerka
    Univ Split, Fac Kinesiol, Split, Croatia.;Univ Mostar, Mostar, Bosnia & Herceg.;Acad Med Sci Bosnia & Herzegovina, Sarajevo, Bosnia & Herceg..
    Sisic, Nedim
    Univ Split, Fac Kinesiol, Split, Croatia..
    Pojskic, Haris
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Peric, Mia
    Univ Split, Fac Kinesiol, Split, Croatia..
    Uljevic, Ognjen
    Univ Split, Fac Kinesiol, Split, Croatia..
    Sekulic, Damir
    Univ Split, Fac Kinesiol, Split, Croatia.; Univ Dept Hlth Care Studies, Split, Croatia..
    Examination of the community-specific prevalence of and factors associated with substance use and misuse among Rural and Urban adolescents: a cross-sectional analysis in Bosnia and Herzegovina2015In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 5, no 11, article id e009446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The community of residence (ie, urban vs rural) is one of the known factors of influence on substance use and misuse (SUM). The aim of this study was to explore the community-specific prevalence of SUM and the associations that exist between scholastic, familial, sports and sociodemographic factors with SUM in adolescents from Bosnia and Herzegovina. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, which was completed between November and December 2014, the participants were 957 adolescents (aged 17 to 18 years) from Bosnia and Herzegovina (485; 50.6% females). The independent variables were sociodemographic, academic, sport and familial factors. The dependent variables consisted of questions on cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption. We have calculated differences between groups of participants (gender, community), while the logistic regressions were applied to define associations between the independent and dependent variables. Results: In the urban community, cigarette smoking is more prevalent in girls (OR= 2.05; 95% CI 1.27 to 3.35), while harmful drinking is more prevalent in boys (OR= 2.07; 95% CI 1.59 to 2.73). When data are weighted by gender and community, harmful drinking is more prevalent in urban boys (OR= 1.97; 95% CI 1.31 to 2.95), cigarette smoking is more frequent in rural boys (OR= 1.61; 95% CI 1.04 to 2.39), and urban girls misuse substances to a greater extent than rural girls (OR= 1.70; 95% CI 1.16 to 2.51, OR= 2.85; 95% CI 1.88 to 4.31, OR= 2.78; 95% CI 1.67 to 4.61 for cigarette smoking, harmful drinking and simultaneous smoking-drinking, respectively). Academic failure is strongly associated with a higher likelihood of SUM. The associations between parental factors and SUM are more evident in urban youth. Sports factors are specifically correlated with SUM for urban girls. Conclusions: Living in an urban environment should be considered as a higher risk factor for SUM in girls. Parental variables are more strongly associated with SUM among urban youth, most probably because of the higher parental involvement in children' personal lives in urban communities (ie, college plans, for example). Specific indicators should be monitored in the prevention of SUM.

  • 19.
    Zubak, Zoran
    et al.
    Special Hosp Biograd, Biograd, Croatia; Univ Mostar, Mostar, Bosnia & Herceg..
    Terzic, Admir
    Univ Tuzla, Tuzla, Bosnia & Herceg..
    Zenic, Natasa
    Univ Split, Split, Croatia.
    Ostojic, Ljerka
    Univ Mostar, Mostar, Bosnia & Herceg.; Univ Split, Split, Croatia; Acad Med Sci, Sarajevo, Bosnia & Herceg..
    Zubak, Ivana
    Univ Zadar, Zadar, Croatia.
    Jelicic, Mario
    Univ Split, Split, Croatia.
    Pojskic, Haris
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Linnaeus Univ, Kalmar.
    Are Sports-Related Factors Correlated to the Prevalence and Initiation of Illicit Drug Misuse in Adolescence?: Prospective Study in Older Adolescents2018In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, article id 1236284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sport participation is considered as a factor of potential influence on illicit drugmisuse (IDM) in adolescence, but there is an evident lack of studies which prospectively investigated this problem. This study aimed to prospectively investigate the sports-related factors related to IDM and the initiation of IDM among older adolescents. The participants were 436 adolescents (202 females; 16 years old at study baseline). They were tested at baseline and follow-up (two years later). The predictors included variables associated with different facets of sports participation and success in sports. The criteria were (i) baseline IDM, (ii) follow-up IDM, and (iii) initiation of IDM between baseline and follow-up. Crude and adjusted (controlled for parental conflict, age, socioeconomic status, and gender) logistic regressions were applied to establish correlations between predictors and criteria. There were higher odds for baseline IDM in adolescents who quit individual sports (OR: 4.2, 95% CI: 1.3-13.9), who had better competitive sports achievements (OR: 1.8, 95% CI: 1.0-3.3), and those involved in sports for a longer time (OR: 1.6, 95% CI: 1.0-2.5). The IDM at follow-up was more prevalent in adolescents who were involved in sports for a longer time (OR: 1.7, 95% CI: 1.1-2.6). Initiation of drug use was predicted by longer experience in sports (OR: 1.8, 95% CI: 1.1-3.1). Sports-related factors were more negatively than positively related to illicit drug use. Most probably, the transition from junior to senior level in sports put specific stress on those adolescents who were highly committed to sports until that time, but who then had to question their own sports abilities and future potential in sports. Sport-authorities should be informed on established results and specific public-health efforts aimed at preventing IDM in athletic adolescents are urgently needed.

  • 20.
    Zubak, Zoran
    et al.
    Faculty of Medicine, University of Mostar; Special Orthopedic Hospital Biograd, Croatia.
    Zenic, Natasa
    Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Split.
    Ostojic, Ljerka
    Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Split.
    Zubak, Ivana
    Department for Ecology, Agronomy and Aquaculture, University of Zadar.
    Pojskic, Haris
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    A Prospective Study on the Influence of Scholastic Factors on the Prevalence and Initiation of Illicit Drug Misuse in Adolescence2018In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 15, no 5, article id 874Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This study aimed to prospectively investigate the scholastic factors related to illicit drug misuse (IDM) and the initiation of IDM among older adolescents from Bosnia andHerzegovina. Methods: This 2-year prospective study included 436 participants (202 females), who were an average of 16 years old at the beginning of the study (baseline). The participants were tested at baseline and follow-up (20 months later). The predictors included variables of scholastic-achievement (grade point average, school absences, unexcused absences and behavioral grade). The criteria were: (i) IDM at baseline; (ii) IDM at follow-up; and (iii) initiation of IDM over the study course. Results: Logistic regression indicated increased odds of IDM in adolescents who were more frequent absent from school (baseline: Odds Ratio (OR): 3.73, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 2.12–6.57; follow-up: OR: 2.91, 95% CI: 1.90–4.65). The lower grade point average and more unexcused absences were evidenced for adolescents who consumed drugs on follow-up(OR: 1.67, 95% CI: 1.11–2.51; OR: 1.74, 95% CI: 1.30–2.32 for grade point average and unexcused absences, respectively). Initiation of IDM was predicted by frequent absences from school (OR: 2.2,95% CI: 1.3–3.8), and lower behavioral grades (OR: 1.9, 95% CI: 1.2–3.3). Conclusions: The findings confirmed strong correlations between scholastic failure and IDM. Absences from school and lower behavioral grades at baseline were predictive of the initiation of IDM in older adolescents.

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