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  • 1.
    Bolin, Niklas
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Reaching the Voter: Exploring Swedish Political Parties’ Assessment of Different Communication Channels in Three National Election Campaigns, 2010–20182019In: Statsvetenskaplig Tidskrift, ISSN 0039-0747, Vol. 121, no 3, p. 347-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mediatization of politics denotes a long-term process through which politicalactors have become increasingly dependent on news media, the key mechanismbeing the adaptation to news media and news media logic by political actors. Oneaspect of this is related to how political parties communicate during election cam-paigns, and how important they perceive different communication channels to be.Against this background, the purpose of this study is to explore the assessment ofdifferent communication channels in election campaigns by political parties overtime. This study analyses the ways in which political parties value the importanceof traditional news media, social media and traditional methods for communica-tion with voters during election campaigns. The empirical material covers the 2010,2014 and 2018 Swedish national elections, enabling us to make comparisons withinthe same national context as well as to explore their development over time. Theresults indicate that news media is still considered the most important communi-cation channel, although social media is levelling the field.

  • 2.
    Bolin, Niklas
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Grusell, Marie
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Nord, Lars
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    De partier som tänker nytt kommer att vinna valet 20222018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Bolin, Niklas
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Falasca, KajsaMid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.Grusell, MarieGöteborgs universitet.Nord, LarsMid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Euroflections: Leading academics on the European Elections 20192019Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Bolin, Niklas
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Grusell, Marie
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Nord, Lars
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    EU-valet var mest av allt 28 nationella val2019Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Bolin, Niklas
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Grusell, Marie
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Nord, Lars
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    What happened in the European Elections? 70 academics share their reflections2019Other (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Changes in election campaign strategies2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Context matters. Interactions between news media, political actors and citizens in elections and crises2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Framing the financial crisis: An analysis of political actors and journalists influence over news media content and the frame building process2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Framing the Financial Crisis: An unexpected interaction between the government and the press2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Framing the Financial Crisis: An unexpected interaction between the government and the press2014In: OBS - Observatorio, ISSN 1646-5954, E-ISSN 1646-5954, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the dynamic interaction between government and news media in the frame-building process, the process of shaping journalistic news frames, during the financial crisis that erupted in September 2008. The unexpected as well as event-driven character of the financial crisis is expected to create dynamics that challenge journalists' dependence on powerful political actors as the national government by opening up the news gate wider to various voices and perspectives. However, the findings of this study indicate unexpected results as the government dominates the frame-building process. In order to empirically explore the frame-building process, this paper employs framing theory to analyse political actors' messages and news media coverage. The study employs two sets of data, the first a content analysis of news coverage and the second a content analysis of political messages, during a three month period in Sweden following the eruption of the financial crisis. Overall, the results of this study indicate that powerful political actors' ability to influence frame-building follows the predictable pattern of indexing also during an unexpected event thus limiting press independence.

  • 11.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Minimal or just difficult to measure? A panel study of agenda-setting effects at the individual level.2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Non-significant or difficult to measure? A panel study of agenda-setting effects in the contemporary media environment2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Non-significant or difficult to measure: A panel study of agenda-setting effects in the contemporary media environmentManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Not minimal but more difficult to measure: A panel study of media effects2018In: OBS - Observatorio, ISSN 1646-5954, E-ISSN 1646-5954, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 48-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional media effect theories as agenda-setting theory have recently been questioned due to the development of the media environment with media fragmentation and individualized media consumption. Other scholars disagree and suggest that a distinction has to be made between actual media effects and the ease with which they can be measured. Given this scholarly discussion the purpose of this study is to investigate and compare the agenda-setting effects of different media consumption measures on individual issue salience. The study is based on a panel survey that includes different measures of consumption: (1) general news media attention, (2) exposure to different media types such as traditional news media, online news media, and political social media. Overall, the findings suggest that general news media attention might be a more significant measure for consumption in a high-choice media environment. In essence, this study suggests that agenda-setting effects are not becoming non-significant but rather difficult to measure.

  • 15.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Nya mediedieter när vertikala och horisontella medier möts2018In: Snabbtänkt: Reflektioner från valet 2018 av ledande forskare / [ed] Nord, L. , Grusell, M. , Bolin, N. & Falasca, K, Sundsvall: Mid Sweden University, DEMICOM , 2018, p. 103-104Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Political news coverage: A longitudinal perspective of mediatization of politics2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Political news journalism: Media interventionism across three news reporting contexts2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Election news coverage has a tendency to frame politics as a strategic game, to increase the role of the journalists as interpreters of political issues and events, and to include a conflict frame. These patterns in election news coverage indicate increased mediatization where media logic rather than political logic governs news media content. However, political news research outside of the election campaign indicate that news media is less independent from political actors. Drawing on literature on mediatization, media interventionism, political news journalism, news framing and source use, the purpose of this article is to empirically investigate whether election news coverage is representative of political news journalism in terms of degree of mediatization. The study is based on a systematic comparison of three content analyses based on the same coding schedule and coding procedure from different news coverage; the Financial Crisis 2008, the Election Campaign 2010 and routine political news coverage 2012 in Sweden. The main conclusion from this study is that mediatization of media coverage is substantially influenced by the specific context of the news. In sum, mediatization of political journalism is moderated by different news reporting contexts such as the election campaign.

  • 18.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Political news journalism: Mediatization across three news reporting contexts2014In: European Journal of Communication, ISSN 0267-3231, E-ISSN 1460-3705, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 583-597Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Election coverage has a tendency to frame politics as a strategic game, to increase the role of

    journalists as interpreters of issues and events and to include a conflict frame, and thus indicating

    increased mediatization. However, political news research outside of the election indicates that

    news media are less independent from political actors. Drawing on literature on mediatization,

    media interventionism, political news journalism, news framing and source use, the purpose of this

    article is to empirically investigate whether election coverage is representative of other political

    journalism in terms of degree of mediatization. The study is based on a systematic comparison

    of three content analyses using the same coding schedule and procedure from coverage of the

    Financial Crisis 2008, the Election Campaign 2010 and routine political news coverage 2012

    in Sweden. The main conclusion from this study is that mediatization of media coverage is

    substantially influenced by the specific context of the news.

  • 19.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Strategic Political Communication in Social Media2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Trends and challenges in the field of political communication2019In: Thule: Kungl. Skytteanska Samfundets Årsbok 2019 / [ed] Jacobsson, Roger, Umeå: Kungl. Skytteanska Samfundet , 2019Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Trump bemästrade medielogiken hela vägen till Vita huset2017In: När makten står på spel: journalistik i valrörelser / [ed] Bengt Johansson och Lars Truedson, Stockholm: Institutet för mediestudier , 2017, p. 152-167Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Dymek, Mikolaj
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Grandien, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Exploring Digital Political Labour: political public relations and the exploitation of social media engagement2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper posits the notion of digital political labour (DPL) as a rewarding concept for the analysis of political public relations and social media. Numerous studies conclude that the engagement, dialogic and social affordances of social media have not yet been realized. But despite the lack of direct interaction, active audiences are, by their own actions in social media, taking part in DPL since audiences do not only receive political messages but contribute significantly with their own user-generated content. This empirical data in this study is from the official Facebook pages of Swedish political parties during the 2014 national election campaign. The results show that most of the communications work is actually performed by the audiences, and not by the parties themselves. This study highlight two important dimensions of DPL where users constitute targets and carriers of advertising as well as audiences whose free labour generates political campaign content.

  • 23.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Dymek, Mikolaj
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Grandien, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Social media election campaigning: who is working for whom? A conceptual exploration of digital political labour2019In: Contemporary Social Science, ISSN 2158-2041, E-ISSN 2158-205X, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 89-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper posits the notion of digital political labour (DPL) as a rewarding concept for the analysis of political communication and social media. Numerous studies conclude that the engagement, dialogic and social affordances of social media have not yet been realised. But despite the lack of direct interaction, active audiences are, by their own actions in social media, taking part in DPL since audiences do not only receive political messages but contribute significantly with their own user-generated content. The empirical data in this study are from the official Facebook pages of Swedish political parties during the 2014 national election campaign. The results show that most of the communications work is actually performed by the audiences, and not by the parties themselves. This study highlight two important dimensions of DPL where users constitute targets and carriers of advertising as well as audiences whose free labour generates political campaign content.

  • 24.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Grandien, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Leaders and followers - a longitudinal study of inter-party relations in election campaigning.2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Grandien, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Where you lead we will follow: A longitudinal study of strategic political communication and inter-party relations in election campaigning2017In: Journal of Public Affairs, ISSN 1472-3891, E-ISSN 1479-1854, Vol. 17, no 3, article id UNSP e1625Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ways in which election campaigns are planned, organized, and conducted have changed considerably during recent decades, and political parties constantly employ new ideas and practices in order to communicate as strategically and effectively as possible. The concept of strategic political communication refers to an organization's purposeful management of information and communication to achieve certain political goals. In this article, we focus on the role of the individual political party in developing election campaigning. The empirical material covers the 2002, 2006, and 2010 Swedish national election campaigns and illustrates how political parties lead and follow each other in the development of strategic political communication. By exploring party agency, this article contributes to the understanding of how ideas and practices of strategic political communication emerge and develop over time in election campaigning.

  • 26.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Grandien, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Where you lead we will follow: A longitudinal study of strategic political communication in election campaigning2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The different ways in which political parties handle environmental changes and challenges they are faced with is often analyzed as a process of adaption where political parties are under the pressure to adapt in order to keep up with developments because it can render strategic advantages. However, political parties do not operate in a vacuum and have to relate to meso and micro environmental factors as well. Nevertheless, there is little research that focuses on if and how party level and inter-party level factors influence the development of strategic political communication. The purpose of this paper is to explore the importance of party agency and inter-party influence for the development of strategic political communication in election campaigning. The empirical material of this study covers the 2002, 2006, 2010 and 2014 Swedish national election campaigns.

  • 27.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Grandien, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Where you lead we will follow: A longitudinal study ofstrategic political communication and inter-partyrelations in election campaigningManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Helgesson, Elin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Revolving around the role of public affairs in the political process2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Nord, Lars
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Challenges for Government communication in Sweden2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Nord, Lars
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Structures, Strategies and Spin: Government Communication in Sweden2013In: Government Communication: Cases and Challenges / [ed] Sanders, Karen & Canel, Marie Jose, Bloomsbury Academic, 2013, p. 27-44Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Shehata, Adam
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Priming Effects During the Financial Crisis: Accessibility and applicability mechanisms behind government approval2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates priming effects during the global financial crisis that erupted in September 2008. Using two longitudinal data sources on public opinion dynamics in Sweden between 2007 and 2010, we find no evidence of a basic priming hypothesis. Despite a substantial increase in negative media coverage of the economy and a clear growth in public concern, citizens did not attach greater weight to economic considerations in their government approval assessments following the outbreak of the economic crisis. Drawing upon the distinction between accessibility and applicability mechanisms, however, additional analysis shows that priming of economic considerations was moderated by citizens' attributions of responsibility for current economic developments. Citizens who primarily considered the ups and downs of the Swedish economy as being a result of the financial crisis were substantially less inclined to let their economic perceptions influence government approval than those who viewed economic developments as caused by government action. These results support the notion of priming as a two-step process, whereby heavy news coverage of the financial crisis increases the accessibility of economic considerations among the audience, but whether these considerations are used in government approval assessments depends on their perceived applicability as well.

  • 32.
    Helgesson, Elin
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    The construction of an elusive concept: Framing the controversial role and practice of lobbying in Swedish media2017In: Public Relations Inquiry, ISSN 2046-147X, E-ISSN 2046-1488, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 275-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study seeks to explore the relation between the elusive scholarly concept and the media framing of the role and practice of lobbying. The longitudinal study analyses a time period of 10 years in Sweden when lobbying has taken on an increasingly influential role in the political system. The results, based on a content analysis of news articles and opinion editorials in five national newspapers and trade media, illustrate that the perception of lobbying is without nuance and a common negative frame is present and continues to be reproduced. Furthermore, a clear contradiction is evident in the relation between the scholarly debate and the mediated debate of the practice. The article discusses what this setting and inconsistency implies for current society and democracy, and the citizen trust in political representatives and institutions.

  • 33.
    Nord, Lars
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Just in time: Comparing party professionalization in different EU campaign contexts in Sweden 2009-20192019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Nord, Lars
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Grusell, Marie
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Bolin, Niklas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Introduction: More like 28 national elections than one European election2019In: Euroflections: Leading academics on the Europran elections 2019 / [ed] Bolin, N., Falasca, K., Grusell, M. & Nord, L., Mid Sweden University, DEMICOM , 2019, p. 9-11Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Nord, Lars
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Grusell, Marie
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Bolin, Niklas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Ingenting är längre som förut...2018In: Snabbtänkt: Reflektioner från valet 2018 av ledande forskare / [ed] Lars Nord, Marie Grusell, Niklas Bolin och Kajsa Falasca, Sundsvall: Mid Sweden University, DEMICOM , 2018, p. 10-12Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Nord, Lars
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Grusell, MarieMid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.Bolin, NiklasMid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.Falasca, KajsaMid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Snabbtänkt: Reflektioner från valet 2018 av ledande forskare2018Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Shehata, Adam
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Priming effects during the financial crisis: accessibility and applicability mechanisms behind government approval2014In: European Political Science Review, ISSN 1755-7739, E-ISSN 1755-7747, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 597-620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates priming effects during the global financial crisis that erupted in September 2008. Using two longitudinal data sources on public opinion dynamics in Sweden between 2007 and 2010, we find no evidence of a basic priming hypothesis. Drawing upon the distinction between accessibility and applicability mechanisms, however, additional analysis indicates that priming of economic considerations was moderated by citizens’ attributions of responsibility for current economic developments. These results support the notion of priming as a two-step process, whereby heavy news coverage of the

    financial crisis increases the accessibility of economic considerations among the audience, but whether these considerations are used in government approval assessments depends on their perceived applicability as well.

  • 38.
    Strömbäck, Jesper
    et al.
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Kruikemeier, Sanne
    A Healthy News Diet? Investigating the Effects of Individual News Diets on Political Participation Offline and Online2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on how citizens in a high-choice media environment can compose an individual media diet and its effects on political participation. More specifically we investigate (a) how people combine the use of offline and online media into personal news diets and (b) the effects of different news diets on both offline and online political participation. Based on a two-wave panel study (N = 2,747) covering the 2014 Swedish national election, the study identifies five media diets: minimalists, public news consumers, local news consumers, social media news consumers, popular online news consumers. Firstly, the results show that minimalists are less likely to participate in politics and secondly that there is a positive relationship between a social media news diet and both offline and online participation. The main results of this study thus suggest that the social network characteristics are more mobilizing than the immediate and interactive nature of more ‘traditional’ online news or a traditional offline news diet.

  • 39.
    Strömbäck, Jesper
    et al.
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Falasca, Kajsa
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Kruikemeier, Sanne
    University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    The Mix of Media Use Matters: Investigating the Effects of Individual News Repertoires on Offline and Online Political Participation2018In: Political Communication, ISSN 1058-4609, E-ISSN 1091-7675, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 413-432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In contemporary high-choice media environments, people increasingly mix and combine their use of various news media into personal news repertoires. Despite this, there is still limited research on how people compose their individual news repertoires and the effects of these news repertoires. To address this and further our understanding of how media use influences political participation, this study investigates (a) how people combine the use of offline and online media into personal news repertoires and (b) the effects of different news repertoires on both offline and online political participation. Based on a two-wave panel study covering the 2014 Swedish national election, this study identifies five news repertoires, labeled minimalists, public news consumers, local news consumers, social media news consumers, and popular online news consumers. Among other things, the results show that social media news consumers are more likely to participate in politics both offline and online.

  • 40.
    Strömbäck, Jesper
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Grandien, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Falasca Larsson, Kajsa
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    Do Campaign Strategies and Tactics Matter?: Exploring Party Elite Perceptions of What Matters When Explaining Election Outcomes2013In: Journal of Public Affairs, ISSN 1472-3891, E-ISSN 1479-1854, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 41-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In research on political campaign communication, it is often assumed that campaign strategies and tactics are highly important for explaining election outcomes. In contrast, most research in political science tends to emphasize the importance of political substance, long-term factors such as party identification, and real-world conditions for explaining election outcomes.

    Although political parties in practice treat election campaigns as highly important and consequential, there is virtually no research on how party elites perceive the importance of campaign strategies and tactics when explaining election outcomes. Hence, drawing on a survey among Swedish members of parliament, this study investigates party elite perceptions of what matters when people decide which party to vote for and of what matters when explaining election outcomes. In brief, the results show that members of parliament perceive campaign strategies and tactics as significantly less important than the substance of politics. In the concluding analysis, the implications of the results are analyzed.

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