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  • 1.
    Abbasi, Seyed H
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    De Leon, AP
    Division of Social Medicine, Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Intitutet, Sweden.
    Kassaian, SE
    Tehran Heart Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Karimi.,, AA
    Tehran Heart Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Sundin, Örjan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Soares, Joaquim J. F.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Macassa, Gloria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Gender Differences in the Risk of Coronary Artery Disease in Iran2012In: Iranian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 0304-4556, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 36-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Given gender differences in the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD), the present study sought to investigate these dissimilarities amongst patients who underwent angiography at a major, tertiary heart hospital in Iran. Methods: Between 2005 and 2010, 44,820 patients who underwent coronary angiography were enrolled in a registry. Pre-procedural data such as demographics, CAD risk factors, presenting symptoms, and laboratory tests, as well as postprocedural data were collected. The data were, subsequently, compared between the men and women. Results: Out of the 44,820 patients (16,378 women), who underwent coronary angiography, 37,358 patients (11,995 women) had CAD. Amongst the CAD patients, the females were not only significantly older, less educated, and more overweight than were the males but also had higher levels of triglyceride, cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, highdensity lipoprotein, and fasting blood sugar (P< 0.001). Of all the risk factors, hypertension and diabetes mellitus showed the strongest association in our female CAD patients (OR=3.45, 95%CI: 3.28-3.61 and OR=2.37, 95%CI: 2.26- 2.48, respectively). Acute coronary syndrome was more prevalent in the men (76.1% vs. 68.6%, P< 0.001), and chronic stable angina was more frequent in the females (31.4% vs. 23.9%, P< 0.001). With respect to post-procedural recommendations, the frequency of recommendations for non-invasive modalities was higher in the females (20.1% vs. 18.6%, P< 0.001). Conclusion: Hypertension and diabetes mellitus had the strongest association with CAD in our female patients. In the extensive CAD patients, medical treatment was recommended to the women more often.

  • 2.
    Abbasi, Seyed H
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Sundin, Örjan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Jalali, Arash
    Teheran Heart Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Soares, Joaquim
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Macassa, Gloria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Högskolan i Gävle.
    Ethnic differences in the risk factors and severity of coronary artery disease: a patient-based study in Iran2018In: Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities, ISSN 2197-3792, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 623-631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Diverse ethnic groups may differ regarding the risk factors and severity of coronary artery disease (CAD). This study sought to assess the association between ethnicity and CAD risk and severity in six major Iranian ethnic groups.

    Methods In this study, 20,165 documented coronary artery disease patients who underwent coronary angiography at a tertiary referral heart center were recruited. The demographic, laboratory, clinical, and risk factor data of all the patients were retrieved. The Gensini score (an indicator of CAD severity) was calculated for all, and the risk factors and severity of CAD were compared between the ethnical groups, using adjusted standardized residuals, Kruskal–Wallis test, and multivariable regression analysis.

    Results The mean age of the participants (14,131 [70.1%] men and 6034 [29.9%] women) was 60.7 ± 10.8 years. The Fars (8.7%) and Gilak (8.6%) ethnic groups had the highest prevalence of ≥4 simultaneous risk factors. The mean Gensini score was the highest for the Gilaks (77.1 ± 55.9) and the lowest among the Lors (67.5 ± 52.8). The multivariable regression analysis showed that the Gilaks had the worst severity (β 0.056, 95% CI 0.009 to 0.102; P = 0.018), followed by the Torks (β 0.032, 95% CI 0.005 to 0.059; P = 0.020). Meanwhile, the Lors showed the lowest severity (β −0.087, 95% CI −0.146 to −0.027; P = 0.004).

    Conclusions This study found that there was heterogeneity in CAD severity and a diverse distribution in its well-known traditional risk factors among major Iranian ethnic groups.

  • 3.
    Abbasi, Seyed
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Ponce De Leon, Antonio
    Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kassaian, Seyed Ebrahim
    Department of Cardiology, Tehran Heart Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Karimi, Abbasali
    Department of Cardiology, Tehran Heart Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Sundin, Örjan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Jalali, Arash
    Department of Cardiology, Tehran Heart Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Soares, Joaquim
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Macassa, Gloria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Socioeconomic status and in hospital mortality of acute corony syndrome: Can education and occupation serves as preventive measures?2015In: International Journal of Preventive Medicine, ISSN 2008-7802, E-ISSN 2008-8213, Vol. 6, article id Art. no. 6:36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Socioeconomic status (SES) can greatly affect the clinical outcome of medical problems. We sought to assess the in‑hospital mortality of patients with the acute coronarysyndrome (ACS) according to their SES.

    Methods: All patients admitted to Tehran Heart Center due to 1st‑time ACS between March 2004 and August 2011 were assessed. The patients who were illiterate/lowly educated (≤5 years attained education) and were unemployed were considered low‑SES patients and those who were employed and had high educational levels (>5 years attained education) were regarded as high‑SES patients. Demographic, clinical, paraclinical, and in‑hospital medical progress data were recorded. Death during the course of hospitalization was considered the end point, and the impact of SES on in‑hospital mortality was evaluated.

    Results: A total of 6246 hospitalized patients (3290 low SES and 2956 high SES) were included (mean age = 60.3 ± 12.1 years, male = 2772 [44.4%]). Among them, 79 (1.26%) patients died. Univariable analysis showed a significantly higher mortality rate in the low‑SES group (1.9% vs. 0.6%; P < 0.001). After adjustment for possible cofounders, SES still showed a significant effect on the in‑hospital mortality of the ACS patients in that the high‑SES patients had a lower in‑hospital mortality rate (odds ratio: 0.304, 95% confidence interval: 0.094–0.980; P = 0.046).

    Conclusions: This study found that patients with low SES were at a higher risk of in‑hospital mortality due to the ACS. Furthermore, the results suggest the need for increased availability of jobs as well as improved levels of education as preventive measures to curb the unfolding deaths owing to coronary artery syndrome.

  • 4.
    Abbasi, Seyed
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Sundin, Örjan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Jalali, A
    Soares, Joaquim
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Macassa, Gloria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Mortality by acute Coronary syndrome in Iran: Does place of residence matter?In: Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Arab-Zozani, Morteza
    et al.
    Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.
    Mostafazadehb, Noosheen
    Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.
    Arab-Zozani, Zeinab
    Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.
    Ghoddoosi-Nejadd, Djavad
    Birjand University of Medical Sciences, Birjand, Iran.
    Hassanipour Azgomie, Soheil
    Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, Iran.
    Soares, Joaquim J.F.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
    The prevalence of elder abuse and neglect in Iran: A systematic review and meta-analysis2018In: Journal of Elder Abuse & Neglect, ISSN 0894-6566, E-ISSN 1540-4129, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 408-423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of elder abuse and neglect in Iran.

    Methods: We searched PubMed, Embase, Scopus, and PsycINFO by the end of 2017. The prevalence was calculated based on the percentage or the amount reported in the studies. Heterogeneity was assessed by the I2 statistic, and the data were combined using random effects model. The results were reported as the pooled estimates and the 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The review protocol was registered in PROSPERO (CRD42017070744).

    Results: A total of 16 studies involving 6,461 participants aged 60 years and over were included. The pooled prevalence for overall elder abuse was 45.7% (95% CI: 27.3–64.1, p < .001).

    Discussion: The prevalence of elder abuse and neglect is substantial in the Iranian population aged 60 years and over. More research is needed to investigate the actual prevalence of elder abuse at the national level.

  • 6.
    Aspelin, Johanna
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Olofsson, Niclas
    FoU Västernorrland.
    Soares, Joaquim
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Ahmadi, Nader
    Univerfsity of Gävle.
    Walander, Anders
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Macassa, Gloria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Gender differences in self-reported health during times of economic crises: Does employment status matter?.2015In: International Journal of Health Sciences & Research, ISSN 2249-9571, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 246-257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Employment status has an impact on health and is a source of health inequalities. But little is known about its impact on the health of people residing in the County of Västernorrland, Sweden. The recent economic recession affected this region in a way which worsened the already existing unemployment rate.Objective of the study: This study aimed to examine the relationship between employment status, gender and self-reported health in the County of Västernorrland, Sweden in the year 2010.Setting and Design: The study used data from a cross-sectional "Health on Equal Terms" survey, carried in the County of Västernorrland in 2010. A total of 6,050 women and men aged 16-65 years were included in the analysis. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses were performed, and results were expressed as odds ratio with 95% confidence intervals.Results: Women and men who were out of work had odds of poor self-reported health of 2.31 (CI 1.94-2.94) and 2.39 (CI 1.96-2.58), respectively. Controlling for other variables reduced the odds of poor health, but the relationship continued to be statistically significant.Conclusion: Results of this study found that at the pick of the most recent economic crises there were equal odds of poor self-reported health among women and men residing in Gävleborg County. The observed association was to some extent explained by demographic, socioeconomic and health-related variables. Policymakers need to pay attention to the health status of those out of work, particularly during times of economic recession and hardship.

  • 7.
    Begum, Afroza
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Rahman, A.K.M. Fazlur
    Center for Injury Prevention and Research, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Rahman, Aminur
    Center for Injury Prevention and Research, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Soares, Joaquim
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Khankeh, Hamid Rez
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Macassa, Gloria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Stockholm; University of Gävle, Gävle.
    Prevalence of suicide ideation among adolescents and young adults in Bangladesh2017In: International Journal of Mental Health, ISSN 0020-7411, E-ISSN 1557-9328, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 177-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Suicide is a leading cause of death world-wide. However, adolescent suicidal behavior is a neglected public health issue, especially in low-income countries such as Bangladesh. The study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of suicidal ideation among adolescents in a rural community and to examine factors associated with suicidal ideation. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in 2013 among 2,476 adolescents aged 14–19 years, selected randomly from a rural community of Bangladesh. An adapted version of the WHO/SUPRE-MISS questionnaire was used to collect data in the Raiganj sub-district. A two stage screening was performed to identify the suicidal ideation cases. It was found that the life-time prevalence for suicidal ideation was 5 percent among adolescents. The majority of the adolescents with suicidal ideation were females 66 (52.8%), unmarried 103 (82.4%), and students 92 (73%). Suicidal ideation was statistically significantly associated with age, education, occupation, living with parents or others, and house ownership. Respondents who were aged 18–19 years, had secondary school certificate (SSC) and secondary school certificate (HSC) or higher education, were day laborers, had own house, and do not lived with parents had odds ratios of 2.31 (CI 1.46–3.65), 2.38 (CI 1.51–3.77), 4.15 (CI 2.41–7.14), 0.28 (CI 0.13–0.60), 0.14(CI 0.05–0.35), and 1.80 (CI 1.07–3.03), respectively. Among adolescents, the prevalence of life-time suicidal ideation was moderately high. Age, education, occupation, house ownership, and living with parents were statistically significantly associated with suicidal ideation. It is important to design and implement effective community based suicide prevention programs for adolescents in Bangladesh.

  • 8. Canavan, Réamonn
    et al.
    Barry, Margaret M
    Matanov, Aleksandra
    Barros, Henrique
    Gabor, Edina
    Greacen, Tim
    Holcnerová, Petra
    Kluge, Ulrike
    Nicaise, Pablo
    Moskalewicz, Jacek
    Díaz-Olalla, José Manuel
    Straßmayr, Christa
    Schene, Aart H
    Soares, Joaquim J. F.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Gaddini, Andrea
    Priebe, Stefan
    Service provision and barriers to care for homeless people with mental health problems across 14 European capital cities2012In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 12, no 222, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9. Chaquisse, E
    et al.
    Fraga, S
    Macassa, Gloria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Soares, Joaquim
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Mbufana, F
    Barros, H
    Sexual and physical intimate partner violence among women using prenatal care in Nampula, Mozambique2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Background: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a major public health problem worldwide but research on IPV in Africa remains limited. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of sexual and physical intimate partner violence against women and its associated factors, in a sample of women using prenatal care in  Nampula, province-Mozambique.

    Methods: This is a cross-sectional study, carried out in six health units, from February 2013 to January 2014. One in every three pregnant women who visited primary health facilities for the first pre-natal appointment was eligible and invited to participate. After obtaining informed consent 869 pregnant answered the Conflict Tactics Scale 2. Odds ratios (OR) and respective 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were calculated by using Logistic Regression.

    Results: The prevalence of sexual abuse ever in life was 49% and of physical abuse was 46%. The past year prevalence was 46% and 44% for sexual and physical abuse, respectively. Sexual abuse and physical violence occurred in every age group. Significant associations were found between previous neonatal deaths and being physically abused, during the life-time (OR= 3.00, 95% IC: 1.67 to 5:39), and the past year (OR=3.23, 95% CI: 1.80 - 5.80).

    Conclusion: This study found a high lifetime and past year violence prevalence among women using prenatal care in Mozambique. Prenatal care provides a window of opportunity for identifying women who experience violence.

    Message 1

    The prevalence of intimate partner violence is very high among women in Mozambique and prenatal care can be a sentinel setting

    Message 2

    The implementation of strategies to support women victims of violence in Mozambique is urgently needed

     

  • 10.
    Chaquisse, Eusébio
    et al.
    EPIUnit, Instituto de Saúde Pública da Universidade do Porto, Portugal; Faculdade de Ciências de Saúde, University of Lúrio, Nampula, Mozambique; National Health Institute, Maputo, Mozambique..
    Fraga, Sílvia
    EPIUnit, Instituto de Saúde Pública da Universidade do Porto; Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade do Porto, Portugal..
    Meireles, Paula
    EPIUnit, Instituto de Saúde Pública da Universidade do Porto, Portugal..
    Macassa, Glória
    EPIUnit, Instituto de Saúde Pública da Universidade do Porto, Portugal; Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, University of Gävle, Sweden..
    Soares, Joaquim
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. EPIUnit, Instituto de Saúde Pública da Universidade do Porto, Portugal.
    Mbofana, Francisco
    National Health Institute, Maputo, Mozambique..
    Barros, Henrique
    EPIUnit, Instituto de Saúde Pública da Universidade do Porto; Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade do Porto, Portugal..
    Sexual and physical intimate partner violence among women using antenatal care in Nampula, Mozambique2018In: Journal of Public Health in Africa, ISSN 2038-9922, E-ISSN 2038-9930, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 1-6, article id 744Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to estimate the prevalence of sexual and physical intimate partner violence (IPV) and its associated factors, in a sample of pregnant women using antenatal care (ANC) in Nampula province - Mozambique. This cross-sectional study was carried out in six health units in Nampula, from February 2013 to January 2014. Overall, 869 participants answered the Conflict Tactics Scale 2. The lifetime and past year prevalence of sexual abuse was 49% and 46%, and of physical abuse was 46% and 44%, respectively. Lifetime and past year sexual abuse was significantly associated with living as a couple, alcohol drinking and having a past diagnosis of gonorrhea. Lifetime and past year physical abuse increased significantly with age and was associated with living as a couple, alcohol drinking and history with syphilis. The prevalence of lifetime and previous year violence among women using ANC was high and similar showing that most women were constantly exposed to IPV. ANC provides a window of opportunity for identifying and acting on violence against women.

  • 11.
    Costa, D
    et al.
    University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
    Hatzidimitriadou, E
    Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury, Kent, UK.
    Ioannidi-Kapolo, E
    National School of Public Health Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Lindert, J
    Protestant University of Applied Sciences Ludwigsburg, Ludwigsburg, Germany; University of Applied Sciences Emden, Emden, Germany; WRSC, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA, USA.
    Soares, Joaquim
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Sundin, Örjan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Toth, O
    Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary.
    Barros, H
    University of Porto and University of Porto Medical School, Porto, Portugal.
    The impact of intimate partner violence on forgone healthcare: a population-based, multicentre European study2018In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    To examine the relationship between forgone healthcare and involvement in intimate partner violence (IPV) as victims, perpetrators or both.

    METHODS:

    This cross-sectional multicentre study assessed community non-institutionalized residents (n = 3496, aged 18-64) randomly selected from six European cities: Athens, Budapest, London, Östersund, Porto, Stuttgart. A common questionnaire was used, including self-reports of IPV and forgone healthcare ('Have you been in need of a certain care service in the past year, but did not seek any help?'). Odds ratios (ORs), 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed fitting logistic regression models adjusted for city, chronic disease, self-assessed health status and financial strain.

    RESULTS:

    Participants experiencing past year IPV (vs. no violence) reported more often to forgone healthcare (n = 3279, 18.6% vs. 15.3%, P = 0.016). IPV experienced as both a victim and perpetrator was associated with forgone healthcare (adjusted OR, 95%CI: 1.32, 1.02-1.70).

    CONCLUSION:

    IPV was associated with forgone healthcare, particularly for those experiencing violence as both victims and perpetrators. Results suggest that preventing IPV among adults may improve timely healthcare uptake.

  • 12.
    Costa, D.
    et al.
    Institute of Public Health, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
    Hatzidimitriadou, E.
    Faculty of Health and Social Care Sciences, Kingston University, London, United Kingdom.
    Ioannidi-Kapolou, E.
    Department of Sociology, National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece.
    Lindert, J.
    University of Emden, Emden, Germany.
    Soares, Joaquim J.F.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Sundin, Örjan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Toth, O.
    Institute of Sociology, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary.
    Barros, H.
    Institute of Public Health, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
    Male and female physical intimate partner violence and socio-economic position: a cross-sectional international multicentre study in Europe2016In: Journal of Public Health, ISSN 2198-1833, E-ISSN 1613-2238, Vol. 139, p. 44-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    This work explores the association between socio-economic position (SEP) and intimate partner violence (IPV) considering the perspectives of men and women as victims, perpetrators and as both (bidirectional).

    Study design

    Cross-sectional international multicentre study.

    Methods

    A sample of 3496 men and women, (aged 18–64 years), randomly selected from the general population of residents from six European cities was assessed: Athens; Budapest; London; Östersund; Porto; and Stuttgart. Their education (primary, secondary and university), occupation (upper white collar, lower white collar and blue collar) and unemployment duration (never, ≤12 months and >12 months) were considered as SEP indicators and physical IPV was measured with the Revised Conflict Tactics Scales.

    Results

    Past year physical IPV was declared by 17.7% of women (3.5% victims, 4.2% perpetrators and 10.0% bidirectional) and 19.8% of men (4.1% victims, 3.8% perpetrators and 11.9% bidirectional). Low educational level (primary vs university) was associated with female victimisation (adjusted odds ratio, 95% confidence interval: 3.2; 1.3–8.0) and with female bidirectional IPV (4.1, 2.4–7.1). Blue collar occupation (vs upper white) was associated with female victimisation (2.1, 1.1–4.0), female perpetration (3.0, 1.3–6.8) and female bidirectional IPV (4.0, 2.3–7.0). Unemployment duration was associated with male perpetration (>12 months of unemployment vs never unemployed: 3.8; 1.7–8.7) and with bidirectional IPV in both sex (women: 1.8, 1.2–2.7; men: 1.7, 1.0–2.8).

    Conclusions

    In these European centres, physical IPV was associated with a disadvantaged SEP. A consistent socio-economic gradient was observed in female bidirectional involvement, but victims or perpetrators-only presented gender specificities according to levels of education, occupation differentiation and unemployment duration potentially useful for designing interventions.

  • 13.
    Costa, D
    et al.
    Institute of Public Health, University of Porto, Rua das Taipas, 135, Porto, 4050-600, Portugal .
    Hatzidimitriadou, E
    Faculty of Health and Social Care Sciences, Kingston University and St George's, University of London, London, United Kingdom .
    Ioannidi-Kapolou, E
    Department of Sociology, National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece .
    Lindert, J
    University of Emden, Emden, Germany .
    Soares, Joaquim
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Sundin, Örjan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Toth, O
    Institute of Sociology, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary .
    Barros, H
    Institute of Public Health, University of Porto, Rua das Taipas, 135, Porto, 4050-600, Portugal .
    Intimate partner violence and health-related quality of life in European men and women: Findings from the DOVE study2015In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 463-473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Purpose

    Little is known on the specific relation between

    being a perpetrator or both a victim and perpetrator of

    intimate partner violence (IPV) and health-related quality

    of life (HRQoL). We assessed the association between

    HRQoL and abuse, considering men and women as victims,

    perpetrators or reciprocally.

    Methods

    Participants were adult men and women

    (

    n=

    3,496), randomly selected from the general population

    of six European cities. The Revised-Conflict-Tactics-Scales

    and the Medical-Outcomes-Study 36-item Short-Form

    Health Survey (SF-36) were used to measure IPV and

    HRQoL. The age-, education-, and city-adjusted mean

    scores[standard error] of the physical and of the mental SF-

    36 component summaries were used to compare victimsonly,

    perpetrators-only, and those involved in both (bidirectional

    or reciprocal cases) with those not involved in pastyear

    and lifetime physical assault and/or sexual coercion.

    Results

    The physical component summary was significantly

    lower in women involved in past-year bidirectional

    physical assault compared with non-abused women. The

    mental component summary in women not involved in IPV

    was significantly higher than in those physically abused,

    regardless of type of involvement. Women victims-only of

    past-year sexual coercion and victims or involved in bidirectional

    concomitant physical and sexual IPV also presented

    lower scores in the mental component summary than

    women not involved in IPV. In men, significantly lower

    scores in the mental component summary were found in the

    past-year bidirectional physically assaulted group and

    among those involved bidirectionally in both physical and

    sexual IPV compared with men not involved in IPV.

  • 14.
    Costa, D.
    et al.
    Univ Porto, P-4100 Oporto, Portugal..
    Hatzidimitriadou, E.
    Univ Kingston, London, England.
    Ioannidi-Kapolou, E.
    Natl Sch Publ Hlth, Athens, Greece..
    Lindert, J.
    Univ Emden, Emden, Germany.
    Soares, Joaquim
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Mid Sweden Univ, Sundsvall, Sweden..
    Sundin, Örjan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology. Mid Sweden Univ, Ostersund, Sweden..
    Toth, O.
    Hungarian Acad Sci, Budapest, Hungary..
    Barros, H.
    Univ Porto, Inst Publ Hlth, P-4100 Oporto, Portugal..
    Physical Intimate Partner Violence in Europe: Results from a Population-Based Multi-Center Study in Six Countries.2015In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 44, no S1, p. 264-264, article id 3583Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Costa, D
    et al.
    Institute of Public Health, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
    Matanov, A
    Unit for Social and Community Psychiatry, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom.
    Canavan, R
    Health Promotion Research Centre, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway, Ireland.
    Gabor, E
    National Institute for Health Development, Budapest, Hungary.
    Greacen, T
    Laboratoire de recherche, Etablissement public de santé Maison Blanche, Paris, France.
    Vondráčková, P
    Department of Addictology, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague and General University Hospital in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Kluge, U
    Clinic for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charite, University Medicine Berlin, CCM, Berlin, Germany.
    Nicaise, P
    Institute of Health and Society (IRSS), Université Catholique de Louvain, Bruxelles, Belgium.
    Moskalewicz, J
    Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology, Warsaw, Poland.
    Díaz–Olalla, JM
    Madrid Salud, Madrid, Spain.
    Straßmayr, C
    Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Social Psychiatry, Vienna, Austria.
    Kikkert, M
    Arkin Institute for Mental Health Care, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Soares, Joaquim J. F.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Gaddini, A
    Laziosanità ASP–Public Health Agency, Lazio Region, Rome, Italy.
    Barros, H
    Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Social Psychiatry, Vienna, Austria.
    Priebe, S
    Unit for Social and Community Psychiatry, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom.
    Factors associated with quality of services for marginalized groups with mental health problems in 14 European countries2014In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, p. Art. no. 49-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Different service characteristics are known to influence mental health care delivery. Much less is

    known about the impact of contextual factors, such as the socioeconomic circumstances, on the provision of care

    to socially marginalized groups.

    The objectives of this work were to assess the organisational characteristics of services providing mental health care

    for marginalized groups in 14 European capital cities and to explore the associations between organisational

    quality, service features and country-level characteristics.

    Methods:

    617 services were assessed in two highly deprived areas in 14 European capital cities. A Quality Index of

    Service Organisation (QISO) was developed and applied across all sites. Service characteristics and country level

    socioeconomic indicators were tested and related with the Index using linear regressions and random intercept

    linear models.

    Results:

    The mean (standard deviation) of the QISO score (minimum = 0; maximum = 15) varied from 8.63 (2.23) in

    Ireland to 12.40 (2.07) in Hungary. The number of different programmes provided was the only service characteristic

    significantly correlated with the QISO (p < 0.05). The national Gross Domestic Product (GDP) was inversely

    associated with the QISO. Nearly 15% of the variance of the QISO was attributed to country-level variables, with

    GDP explaining 12% of this variance.

    Conclusions:

    Socioeconomic contextual factors, in particular the national GDP are likely to influence the

    organisational quality of services providing mental health care for marginalized groups. Such factors should be

    considered in international comparative studies. Their significance for different types of services should be explored

    in further research.

    Keywords:

    Mental health services, Quality index of service organization, Socially marginalized groups,

    Multi-level analysis

  • 16.
    Costa, D
    et al.
    EPIUnit - Institute of Public Health, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal .
    Soares, Joaquim
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Lindert, J
    University of Emden, Emden, Germany .
    Hatzidimitriadou, E
    Faculty of Health and Social Care Sciences, Kingston University, London, United Kingdom .
    Sundin, Örjan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Toth, O
    Institute of Sociology, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary .
    Ioannidi-Kapolo, E
    National School of Public Health Athens, Athens, Greece .
    Barros, H
    EPIUnit - Institute of Public Health, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal .
    Intimate partner violence: a study in men and women from six European countries2015In: International Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1661-8556, E-ISSN 1661-8564, Vol. 60, no 4, p. 467-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives We aimed to assess intimate partner violence

    (IPV) among men and women from six cities in six European

    countries.

    Methods Four IPV types were measured in a populationbased

    multicentre study of adults (18–64 years;

    n = 3,496). Sex- and city-differences in past year prevalence

    were examined considering victims, perpetrators or

    both and considering violent acts’ severity and repetition.

    Results Male victimization of psychological aggression

    ranged from 48.8 % (Porto) to 71.8 % (Athens) and female

    victimization from 46.4 % (Budapest) to 70.5 % (Athens).

    Male and female victimization of sexual coercion ranged

    from 5.4 and 8.9 %, respectively, in Budapest to 27.1 and

    25.3 % in Stuttgart. Male and female victims of physical

    assault ranged from 9.7 and 8.5 %, respectively, in Porto,

    to 31.2 and 23.1 % in Athens. Male victims of injury were

    2.7 % in O¨ stersund and 6.3 % in London and female victims

    were 1.4 % in O¨ stersund and 8.5 % in Stuttgart. IPV

    differed significantly across cities (p\0.05). Men and

    women predominantly experienced IPV as both victims

    and perpetrators with few significant sex-differences within

    cities.

    Conclusions Results support the need to consider men

    and women as both potential victims and perpetrators when

    approaching IPV.

  • 17. Costa, Diogo
    et al.
    Hatzidimitriadou, Eleni
    Ioannidi-Kapolou, Elli
    Lindert, Jutta
    Soares, Joaquim
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Sundin, Örjan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Toth, Olga
    Barros, Henrique
    Forgone healthcare and intimate partner violence: A study in six European urban centres2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Victims of intimate partner violence (IPV) are known to refrain from seeking care when in need. Whether the impact on forgone care differs according to the victim-perpetrator role remains unexplored. We aimed to describe the relation between past-year IPV and forgone healthcare according to victims, perpetrators or both (bidirectional). Methods: Adult men and women (n=3496, aged 18-64), randomly sampled from the general population of Athens, Porto, London, Budapest, Östersund and Stuttgart were assessed using a common questionnaire. IPV was ascertained with the Revised-Conflict-Tactics-Scales. The association between IPV and forgone healthcare (“Have you been in need of a certain care service in the past year, but did not seek any help?”), sociodemographics (sex, age, education, city) and health factors (self-assessed health, public or private healthcare sector use), in victims, perpetrators and both was estimated using adjusted logistic regression odds ratios (AOR, 95% confidence intervals). Results: Forgone healthcare ranged from 12.6% (Budapest) to 22.4% (Stuttgart) and was associated with bidirectional involvement in IPV (AOR, 95%CI= 1.37, 1.05-1.78). A lower educational level was associated with forgone care in multivariate models fitted for victims of and for bidirectional involvement in IPV. A fair/poor self-assessed health (contrasting to a good/very good/excellent health) was significantly associated with forgone care in victims (AOR, 95%CI=2.61, 1.96-3.47), in bidirectional IPV (AOR, 95%CI=2.94, 2.27-3.82) and for perpetrators (AOR, 95%CI=2.58, 1.96-3.40). Conclusion: Beside the known barriers identified for inequalities and access to healthcare, the role of IPV in forgone healthcare should be considered.

     

  • 18.
    Costa, Diogo
    et al.
    Univ Porto, Sch Med, Dept Clin Epidemiol Predict Med & Publ Hlth, P-4100 Oporto, Portugal .
    Matanov, A.
    Queen Mary Univ London, Unit Social & Community Psychiat, London, England .
    Canavan, R.
    Natl Univ Ireland, Hlth Promot Res Ctr, Galway, Ireland .
    Gabor, E.
    Natl Inst Hlth Dev, Budapest, Hungary .
    Greacen, T.
    Etab Publ Sante Maison Blanche, Lab Rech, Paris, France .
    Vondrackova, P.
    Charles Univ Prague, Fac Med 1, Dept Addictol, Prague, Czech Republic .
    Kluge, U.
    Univ Med Berlin, Charite, Clin Psychiat & Psychotherapy, Berlin, Germany .
    Nicaise, P.
    Catholic Univ Louvain, Inst Hlth & Soc IRSS, B-1200 Brussels, Belgium .
    Moskalewicz, J.
    Inst Psychiat & Neurol, Warsaw, Poland .
    Diaz-Olalla, J. M.
    Madrid Salud, Madrid, Spain .
    Strassmayr, C.
    Ludwig Boltzmann Inst Social Psychiat, Vienna, Austria .
    Kikkert, M.
    Univ Amsterdam, Acad Med Ctr, NL-1012 WX Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Soares, Joaquim
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Gaddini, A.
    Laziosanita ASP Publ Hlth Agcy, Rome, Lazio Region, Italy.
    Barros, H.
    Univ Porto, Sch Med, Dept Clin Epidemiol Predict Med & Publ Hlth, P-4100 Oporto, Portugal .
    Priebe, S.
    Queen Mary Univ London, Unit Social & Community Psychiat, London, England .
    Factors associated with quality of services for marginalized groups with mental health problems in 14 European countries2012In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 22, no Suppl 2, p. 70-71Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Costa, Diogo
    et al.
    Institute of Public Health, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
    Soares, Joaquim J. F.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Lindert, Jutta
    Department of Public Health, Protestant University of Applied Sciences Ludwigsburg, Ludwigsburg, Germany.
    Hatzidimitriadou, Eleni
    Faculty of Health and Social Care Sciences, Kingston University and St George's, University of London, London, United Kingdom.
    Karlsson, Andreas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sundin, Örjan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Toth, Olga
    Institute of Sociology, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary.
    Ioannidi-Kapolo, Ellisabeth
    Institute of Sociology, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary.
    Degomme, Oliver
    International Centre for Reproductive Health (ICRH), Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Cervilla, Jorge
    Departmental Section of Psychiatry and Psychological Medicine, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
    Barros, Henrique
    Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Predictive Medicine and Public Health, University of Porto Medical School, Porto, Portugal.
    Intimate partner violence in Europe: design and methods of a multinational study.: La violencia de pareja en Europa: diseño y métodos de un estudio multinacional2013In: Gaceta Sanitaria, ISSN 0213-9111, E-ISSN 1578-1283, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 558-561Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To describe the design, methods, procedures and characteristics of the population involved in a study designed to compare Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) in eight European countries.

    Methods Women and men aged 18–65, living in Ghent-Belgium (n = 245), Stuttgart-Germany (n = 546), Athens-Greece (n = 548), Budapest-Hungary (n = 604), Porto-Portugal (n = 635), Granada-Spain (n = 138), Östersund-Sweden (n = 592), London-United Kingdom (n = 571), were sampled and administered a common questionnaire. Chi-square goodness of fit and five-age strata population fractions ratios for sex and education were computed to evaluate samples' representativeness.

    Results Differences in the age distributions were found among women from Sweden and Portugal and among men from Belgium, Hungary, Portugal and Sweden. Over-recruitment of more educated respondents was noted in all sites.

    Conclusion The use of a common research protocol with the same structured questionnaire is likely to provide accurate estimates of the general population IPV frequency, despite limitations in probabilistic sampling and restrictions in methods of administration.

  • 20.
    Dallender et al, J
    et al.
    England.
    Nolan, P
    Soares, Joaquim
    Thomsen, S
    Arnetz, B
    A comparative study of perceptions of British mental health nurses and psychiatrists of their work environment1999In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 36-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This comparative study of the perceptions of mental health nurses and psychiatrists about aspects of their work environment was undertaken in the West Midlands in England. The aim of the study was to ascertain the extent to which the environment in which mental health professionals' work impacts on their own mental and physical well-being. Seventy-four psychiatrists and 301 mental health nurses responded to a postal questionnaire. Analysis of data indicated that significant differences exist between nurses and psychiatrists in their working conditions, their physical working environment, their sources of support with a work-related problem, and the effects of their work on their own mental and physical health. The main recommendation derived from this study was to improve communication between mental health professionals and their managers by giving more structured feedback and guidance about one's work performance. This may help to alleviate the mental strain many mental health professionals experience in their work.

  • 21.
    Dauvrin, M.
    et al.
    Institute of Health and Society IRSS, Université Catholique de Louvain, Clos Chapelle aux Champs 30 B1.30.15, 1200 Bruxelles, Belgium.
    Lorant, V
    Institute of Health and Society IRSS, Université Catholique de Louvain, Clos Chapelle aux Champs 30 B1.30.15, 1200 Bruxelles, Belgium.
    Sandhu, S
    Unit for Social and Community Psychiatry, London and the Barts School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London E13 8SP, United Kingdom.
    Devillé, W
    International and Migrant Health, NIVEL (Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research), Otterstraat 118-124, 3500, BN Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Dia, H
    Etablissement Public de Santé Maison Blanche, 3-5 rue Lespagnol, 75020 Paris, France.
    Dias, S
    Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Rua da Junqueira, 96, 1349-008, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Gaddini, A
    Laziosanit ASP Public Health Agency for the Lazio Region, Via S. Costanza 53, 00185 Rome, Italy.
    Ioannidis, E
    Department of Sociology, National School of Public Health, 196 Alexandras avenue, Athens 11521, Greece.
    Jensen, N
    Department of Public Health, Danish Research Centre for Migration, Ethnicity and Health (MESU), University of Copenhagen, Oster Farimagsgade 5, DK-1014 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kluge, U
    Clinic for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medicine Berlin, CCM, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin, Germany.
    Mertaniemi, R
    Department for Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), P.O.B. 30, FIN-00271 Helsinki, Finland.
    Puigpinás I Riera, R
    Agency of Public Health of Barcelona, Pça. Lesseps, 1, 08023 Barcelona, Spain.
    Sárváry, A
    Faculty of Health, University of Debrecen, Sástái út 2-4, 4400 Nyíregyháza, Hungary.
    Stramayr, C
    Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Social Psychiatry, Lazarettgasse 14A-912, 1090 Vienna, Austria.
    Stankunas, M
    Department of Health Management, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, A. Mickeviciaus 9, Kaunas 44307, Lithuania.
    Soares, Joaquim J. F.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Welbel, M
    Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology, Ul. Sobieskiego 9, 02-957 Warsaw, Poland.
    Priebe, S
    Unit for Social and Community Psychiatry, London and the Barts School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London E13 8SP, United Kingdom.
    Health care for irregular migrants: Pragmatism across Europe. A qualitative study2012In: BMC Research Notes, ISSN 1756-0500, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 5, p. Art. no. 99-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract. Background: Health services in Europe face the challenge of delivering care to a heterogeneous group of irregular migrants (IM). There is little empirical evidence on how health professionals cope with this challenge. This study explores the experiences of health professionals providing care to IM in three types of health care service across 16 European countries. Results: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with health professionals in 144 primary care services, 48 mental health services, and 48 Accident & Emergency departments (total n = 240). Although legal health care entitlement for IM varies across countries, health professionals reported facing similar issues when caring for IM. These issues include access problems, limited communication, and associated legal complications. Differences in the experiences with IM across the three types of services were also explored. Respondents from Accident & Emergency departments reported less of a difference between the care for IM patients and patients in a regular situation than did respondents from primary care and mental health services. Primary care services and mental health services were more concerned with language barriers than Accident & Emergency departments. Notifying the authorities was an uncommon practice, even in countries where health professionals are required to do this. Conclusions: The needs of IM patients and the values of the staff appear to be as important as the national legal framework, with staff in different European countries adopting a similar pragmatic approach to delivering health care to IM. While legislation might help to improve health care for IM, more appropriate organisation and local flexibility are equally important, especially for improving access and care pathways. © 2012 Dauvrin et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  • 22.
    Deville, Walter
    et al.
    NIVEL Netherlands Inst Hlth Serv Res, NL-3500 BN Utrecht, Netherlands. .
    Greacen, Tim
    Etab Publ Sante Maison Blanche, F-75019 Paris, France. .
    Bogic, Marija
    Queen Mary Univ London, Unit Social & Community Psychiat, Newham Ctr Mental Hlth, London E13 8SP, England. .
    Dauvrin, Marie
    Catholic Univ Louvain, Inst Hlth & Soc, B-1200 Brussels, Belgium. .
    Dias, Sonia
    Univ Nova Lisboa, Inst Higiene & Med Trop, P-1349008 Lisbon, Portugal.
    Gaddini, Andrea
    Laziosanita ASP Publ Hlth Agcy Lazio Reg, I-00198 Rome, Italy. .
    Jensen, Natasja Koitzsch
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Publ Hlth, Sect Hlth Serv Res, Danish Res Ctr Migrat Ethn & Hlth MESU, DK-1014 Copenhagen, Denmark. .
    Karamanidou, Christina
    Natl Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Sociol, Athens 11521, Greece. .
    Kluge, Ulrike
    Charite, CCM, Clin Psychiat & Psychotherapy, D-10117 Berlin, Germany. .
    Mertaniemi, Ritva
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welf THL, Dept Mental Hlth & Subst Abuse Serv, FIN-00271 Helsinki, Finland. .
    Puigpinos i Riera, Rosa
    Agcy Publ Hlth Barcelona, Barcelona 08023, Spain. .
    Sarvary, Attila
    Univ Debrecen, Fac Hlth Sci Nyiregyhaza, H-4400 Nyiregyhaza, Hungary. .
    Soares, Joaquim J. F.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Stankunas, Mindaugas
    Lithuanian Univ Hlth Sci, Dept Hlth Management, LT-44307 Kaunas, Lithuania. .
    Strassmayr, Christa
    Ludwig Boltzmann Inst Social Psychiat, A-1090 Vienna, Austria. .
    Welbel, Marta
    Inst Psychiat & Neurol, PL-02957 Warsaw, Poland..
    Priebe, Stefan
    Queen Mary Univ London, Unit Social & Community Psychiat, Newham Ctr Mental Hlth, London E13 8SP, England..
    Health care for immigrants in Europe: Is there still consensus among country experts about principles of good practice? A Delphi study2011In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 11, p. Art. no. 699-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: European Member States are facing a challenge to provide accessible and effective health care services for immigrants. It remains unclear how best to achieve this and what characterises good practice in increasingly multicultural societies across Europe. This study assessed the views and values of professionals working in different health care contexts and in different European countries as to what constitutes good practice in health care for immigrants. Methods: A total of 134 experts in 16 EU Member States participated in a three-round Delphi process. The experts represented four different fields: academia, Non-Governmental Organisations, policy-making and health care practice. For each country, the process aimed to produce a national consensus list of the most important factors characterising good practice in health care for migrants. Results: The scoring procedures resulted in 10 to 16 factors being identified as the most important for each participating country. All 186 factors were aggregated into 9 themes: (1) easy and equal access to health care, (2) empowerment of migrants, (3) culturally sensitive health care services, (4) quality of care, (5) patient/health care provider communication, (6) respect towards migrants, (7) networking in and outside health services, (8) targeted outreach activities, and (9) availability of data about specificities in migrant health care and prevention. Although local political debate, level of immigration and the nature of local health care systems influenced the selection and rating of factors within each country, there was a broad European consensus on most factors. Yet, discordance remained both within countries, e. g. on the need for prioritising cultural differences, and between countries, e. g. on the need for more consistent governance of health care services for immigrants. Conclusions: Experts across Europe asserted the right to culturally sensitive health care for all immigrants. There is a broad consensus among experts about the major principles of good practice that need to be implemented across Europe. However, there also is some disagreement both within and between countries on specific issues that require further research and debate.

  • 23. Di Rosa, Mirko
    et al.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    Melchiorre, M. Gabriella
    Italian National Institute of Health and Science on Aging (INRCA), Ancona, Italy.
    Barros, H
    Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Porto Medical School, Porto, Portugal.
    Torres-Gonzales, F
    Departmental Section of Psychiatry and Psychological Medicine, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
    Ioannidi – Kapolou, E
    Department of Sociology, National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece.
    Lindert, J
    Protestant University of Applied Sciences, Ludwigsburg, Germany.
    Stankunas, M
    Department of Health Management, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Soares, Joaquim J. F.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Elder abuse in Italy: selected findings from the ABUEL project2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Dias, NG
    et al.
    EpiUnit, Instituto de Saúde Pública da Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal; Departamento de Saúde Coletiva da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Uberlândia, Minas Gerais, Brazil.
    Costa, D
    EpiUnit, Instituto de Saúde Pública da Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal.
    Soares, Joaquim
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. EpiUnit, Instituto de Saúde Pública da Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal.
    Hatzidimitriadou, E
    Faculty of Health and Social Care Sciences, Kingston University and St George’s, University of London, London, UK.
    Ioannidi-Kapolou, E
    Department of Sociology, National School of Public Health Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Lindert, J
    University of Applied Sciences Emden, Emden, Germany Women’s Studies Research Center, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA, USA.
    Sundin, Örjan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Toth, O
    Institute of Sociology, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary.
    Barros, H
    EpiUnit, Instituto de Saúde Pública da Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal Departamento de Ciências da Saúde Pública e Forenses e Educação Médica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal.
    Fraga, S
    EpiUnit, Instituto de Saúde Pública da Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal.
    Social support and the intimate partner violence victimization among adults from six European countries2018In: Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Social support may buffer the negative effects of violence on physical and mental health. Family medicine providers play an essential role in identifying the available social support and intervening in intimate partner violence (IPV).

    Objective

    This study aimed at assessing the association between social support and the IPV victimization among adults from six European countries.

    Methods

    This is a cross-sectional multi-centre study that included individuals from Athens (Greece), Budapest (Hungary), London (UK), Östersund (Sweden), Porto (Portugal) and Stuttgart (Germany). Data collection was carried out between September 2010 and May 2011. The sample consisted of 3496 adults aged 18–64 years randomly selected from the general population in each city. The revised Conflict Tactics Scales was used to assess IPV victimization. Social support was assessed with the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support.

    Results

    Participants reporting physical assault victimization experienced lower social support (mean ± SD) than their counterparts, 66.1 ± 13.96 versus 71.7 ± 12.90, P< 0.001, for women; and 67.1 ± 13.69 versus 69.5 ± 13.52, P = 0.002 for men. Similar results were found regarding sexual coercion victimization, 69.1 ± 14.03 versus 71.3 ± 12.97, P = 0.005 for women and 68.0 ± 13.29 versus 69.3 ± 13.62, P= 0.021 for men. This study revealed lower levels of social support among participants reporting lifetime and past year victimization, independent of demographic, social and health-related factors.

    Conclusion

    Results showed a statistically significant association between low social support and IPV victimization. Although the specific mechanisms linking social support with experiences of violence need further investigation, it seems that both informal and formal networks may be associated with lower levels of abusive situations.

  • 25.
    Eslami, Bahareh
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Macassa, Gloria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Högskolan i Gävle.
    Melchiorre, M G
    Italian National Institute of Health and Science on Aging, INRCA, Ancona, Italy.
    Barros, H
    University of Porto Medical School, Porto, Portugal.
    Viitasara, Eija
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Lindert, J
    University of Emden, Emden, Germany.
    Stankunas, M
    Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Torres-Gonzalez, F
    University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
    Ioannidi-Kapolou, E
    National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece.
    Soares, Joaquim J.F.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Life-time abuse and mental health among older persons: a European study2017In: Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment & Trauma, ISSN 1092-6771, E-ISSN 1545-083X, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 590-607Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to investigate the association of lifetime abuse and mental health among older persons, considering associated factors (e.g., demographics) through a cross-sectional design. We recruited 4,467 women and men ages 60–84 years from 7 European cities. Mental health was measured with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and abuse (psychological, physical, sexual, financial, and physical injuries) based on the Revised Conflict Tactics Scale and the UK survey of abuse/neglect of older people. Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that country of residence, low educational level, and experienced financial strain increased the odds of probable cases of anxiety and depression. Female sex, white-collar profession, and financial support by social/other benefits/or partner income were associated with higher odds of anxiety, while older age and experience of lifetime injury were associated with increased odds of depressive symptoms. The findings of this study indicate that socioeconomic factors, as well as experienced lifetime severe physical abuse leading to injuries, are significant in perceived mental health of adults in later life.

  • 26.
    Eslami, Bahareh
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Department of Research, Tehran Heart Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Macassa, Gloria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden .
    Sundin, Örjan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Khankeh, HR
    Department of Nursing, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Soares, Joaquim J. F.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Department of Public Health Sciences, Institution of Social Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Quality of life and life satisfaction among adults with and without congenital heart disease in a developing country2015In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 169-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Life-expectancy of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has improved world-wide, but there are limited data on these patients' experiences of quality of life (QoL), life satisfaction (LS), and their determinants (e.g. social support), particularly among patients from developing countries.

    Design Cross-sectional case-control.

    Methods A total of 347 CHD patients (18-64 years, 52.2% women) and 353 non-CHD participants, matched by sex/age, were recruited from two heart hospitals in Tehran, Iran. LS and QoL served as dependent variables, and demographic/socioeconomic status, mental-somatic symptoms, social support, and clinical factors (e.g. defect category) served as independent variables in multiple regression analyses once among all participants, and once only among CHD patients.

    Results The CHD patients had significantly lower scores in LS and all domains of QoL than the control group. However, having CHD was independently negatively associated only with overall QoL, physical health, and life and health satisfaction. Additionally, multivariate analyses among the CHD patients revealed that female sex, younger age, being employed, less emotional distress, and higher social support were significantly associated with higher perceived QoL in most domains, while LS was associated with female sex, being employed, less emotional distress, and better social support. Neither QoL nor LS was associated with cardiac defect severity.

    Conclusions The adults with CHD had poorer QoL and LS than their non-CHD peers in our developing country. Socio-demographics, emotional health, and social support were important 'determinants' of QoL and LS among the CHD patients. Longitudinal studies are warranted to establish causal links.

  • 27.
    Eslami, Bahareh
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Macassa, Gloria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences University of Gävle Gävle Sweden .
    Sundin, Örjan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Khankeh, HR
    Department of Nursing, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Soares, Joaquim J. F.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Department of Public Health Sciences Institution of Social Medicine, Karolinska Institutet Stockholm Sweden .
    Style of Coping and its Determinants in Adults with Congenital Heart Disease in a Developing Country2014In: Congenital Heart Disease, ISSN 1747-079X, E-ISSN 1747-0803, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 349-360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The objective of this study is to compare coping strategies between adults with and without congenital heart disease and to scrutinize the associations between different available resources (e.g., social support) and adoption of certain coping strategies.

    DesignThe study has a cross-sectional case-control design.

    SettingThe study was conducted in two university-affilliated heart hospitals in Tehran, Iran.

    Patients The participants comprised 347 persons (18–64 years) with and 353 individuals without congenital heart disease, matched by gender and age.

    Outcome Measures Coping strategies, assessed with the Utrecht Coping List-short form, were compared between both groups. Block-wise multiple regression analyses were conducted to scrutinize the associations between different independent variables (e.g., demographic/socioeconomic statuses) and adoption of certain styles of coping (dependent variables) among all participants and separately for each group.

    Results The styles of coping in the patients were comparable with those of the control group. Multivariate analyses revealed that congenital heart disease per se was not associated with style of coping except for palliative reaction pattern. The active problem-solving coping style was associated with never married marital status, parenthood, unemployment, higher level of anxiety/somatic symptoms, lower level of depressive symptoms, and better social support. The avoidance behavior style was associated with having a low income, whereas the expression of emotion style was associated with higher anxiety symptoms, experience of financial strain, and income. None of the adopted coping strategies was related to the heart disease variables.

    Conclusions The adults with congenital heart disease coped as well as adults without congenital heart disease. Marital status, parenthood, annual income, financial strain, psychological adjustment, and perceived social support were important explanatory factors in adopting a certain style of coping among adults with congenital heart disease. However, longitudinal studies with repeated measures are warranted.

  • 28.
    Eslami, Bahareh
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Department of Research, Tehran Heart Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran .
    Sundin, Örjan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Macassa, Gloria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden .
    Khankeh, Hamid Reza
    Department of Nursing, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Soares, Joaquim J. F.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Division of Social Medicine, Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Gender differences in health conditions and socio-economic status of adults with congenital heart disease in a developing country2013In: Cardiology in the Young, ISSN 1047-9511, E-ISSN 1467-1107, Vol. 23, no 02, p. 209-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Providing appropriate care for adults with congenital heart disease requires the evaluation of their current situation. There is limited research in Iran about these patients, particularly in relation to gender differences in the demographic/socio-economic and lifestyle factors, as well as disease parameters.

    Materials and methods The sample consisted of 347 congenital heart disease patients in the age group of 18–64 years, including 181 women, assessed by an analytical cross-sectional study. The patients were recruited from the two major heart hospitals in Tehran. Data were collected using questionnaires.

    Results The mean age of the patients was 33.24 years. Women were more often married and more often had offspring than men (p < 0.001). Educational level and annual income were similar between women and men. Unemployment was higher among women (p < 0.001), but financial strain was higher among men (p < 0.001). Smoking, alcohol, and water-pipe use was higher among men than among women (p < 0.001). Cardiac factors, for example number of cardiac defects, were similar among women and men, except that there were more hospitalisations owing to cardiac problems, for example arrhythmia, among men. Disease was diagnosed mostly at the hospital (57.4%). Most medical care was provided by cardiologists (65.1%). Only 50.1% of patients had knowledge about their type of cardiac defect.

    Conclusion Gender differences exist in the socio-economic and lifestyle characteristics of adults with congenital heart disease, in some cases related to the disease severity. Our findings also point to the need for interventions to increase patients’ knowledge about, and use of, healthier lifestyle behaviours, irrespective of gender. Furthermore, providing appropriate jobs, vocational training, and career counselling may help patients to be more productive.

  • 29.
    Eslami, Bahareh
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Sundin, Örjan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Macassa, Gloria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Khankeh, HR
    Department of Nursing, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Soares, Joaquim J. F.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Anxiety, depressive and somatic symptoms in adults with congenital heart disease2013In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 74, no 1, p. 49-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    Despite the improvement in life-expectancy of adults with congenital heart disease, they may experience unique medical and social challenges that could impact on their psychological functioning. The aims of this study were to address the experience of anxiety, depressive and somatic symptoms among adults with congenital heart disease in comparison with that of non-heart diseased persons considering the role of various factors (e.g. socio-economic).

    Methods

    In cross-sectional case–control study, the participants consisted of 347 patients with congenital heart disease (18–64 years, 52.2% female) and 353 matched (by sex/age) non-heart diseased persons. The participants completed a questionnaire. The data were analyzed with bivariate and multivariate methods.

    Results

    In bivariate analyses, scores in anxiety and somatic symptoms were higher among patients than the healthy controls (both at p ≤ 0.001), whereas the groups did not differ in depressive symptoms. Following multiple-linear-regression-analyses, only the association between congenital heart disease and somatic symptoms was confirmed. Among the patients, perceived financial strain was significantly related to anxiety, depressive and somatic symptoms; lower perceived social support to anxiety and depression; and low annual income to somatic symptoms. Additionally, somatic symptoms were associated with anxiety and depressive symptoms, and vice versa. And no medical variables were related to anxiety, depressive and somatic symptoms.

    Conclusions

    Congenital heart disease was only independently associated with somatic symptoms. Financial strain, social support and co-existence of emotional distress with somatic symptoms should be considered in developing appropriate interventions to improve the well-being of patients with congenital heart disease. However, longitudinal research is warranted to clarify causality.

  • 30.
    Eslami, Bahareh
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Viitasara, Eija
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Macassa, Gloria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Melchiorre, Maria Gabriella
    Italian National Institute of Health and Science on Aging.
    Lindert, Jutta
    University of Emden, Emden, Germany.
    Stankunas, Mindaugas
    Lithuanian University of Health Sciences.
    Torres-Gonzalez, Francisco
    University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
    Barros, Henrique
    University of Porto Medical School, Porto, Portugal.
    Ioannidi-Kapolou, Elisabeth
    National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece.
    Soares, Joaquim J. F.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    The prevalence of lifetime abuse among older adults in seven European countries2016In: International Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1661-8556, E-ISSN 1661-8564, Vol. 61, no 8, p. 891-901Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To investigate the lifetime prevalence rate of abuse among older persons and to scrutinize the associated factors (e.g. demographics).

    Methods This cross-sectional population-based study had 4467 participants, aged 60–84, from seven European cities. Abuse (psychological, physical, sexual, financial and injuries) was measured based on The Revised Conflict Tactics Scale, and the UK survey of abuse/neglect of older people.

    Results Over 34 % of participants reported experiencing lifetime psychological, 11.5 % physical, 18.5 % financial and 5 % sexual abuse and 4.3 % reported injuries. Lifetime psychological abuse was associated with country, younger age, education and alcohol consumption; physical abuse with country, age, not living in partnership; injuries with country, female sex, age, education, not living in partnership; financial abuse with country, age, not living in partnership, education, benefiting social/partner income, drinking alcohol; and sexual abuse with country, female sex and financial strain.

    Conclusions High lifetime prevalence rates confirm that elder abuse is a considerable public health problem warranting further longitudinal studies. Country of residence is an independent factor associated with all types of elder abuse which highlights the importance of national interventions alongside international collaborations.

    Keywords Determinant Elder abuse Financial Injuries Psychological Sexual

  • 31.
    Fraga, S
    et al.
    Institute of Public Health, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
    Lindert, J
    Department of Public Health Science, Protestant University of Applied Sciences, Ludwigsburg, Germany.
    Barros, H
    Institute of Public Health, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.
    Torres-Gonzalez, F
    CIBERSAM, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
    Ioannidi-Kapolou, E
    Department of Sociology, National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece.
    Melchiorre, MG
    I.N.R.C.A., Ancona, Italy.
    Stankunas, M
    Department of Health Management, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Soares, Joaquim
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Elder abuse and socioeconomic inequalities: A multilevel study in 7 European countries2014In: Preventive Medicine, ISSN 0091-7435, E-ISSN 1096-0260, Vol. 61, p. 42-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To compare the prevalence of elder abuse using a multilevel approach that takes into account the characteristics of participants as well as socioeconomic indicators at city and country level.

    Methods In 2009, the project on abuse of elderly in Europe (ABUEL) was conducted in seven cities (Stuttgart, Germany; Ancona, Italy; Kaunas, Lithuania, Stockholm, Sweden; Porto, Portugal; Granada, Spain; Athens, Greece) comprising 4467 individuals aged 60–84 years. We used a 3-level hierarchical structure of data: 1) characteristics of participants; 2) mean of tertiary education of each city; and 3) country inequality indicator (Gini coefficient). Multilevel logistic regression was used and proportional changes in Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) were inspected to assert explained variance between models.

    Results The prevalence of elder abuse showed large variations across sites. Adding tertiary education to the regression model reduced the country level variance for psychological abuse (ICC = 3.4%), with no significant decrease in the explained variance for the other types of abuse. When the Gini coefficient was considered, the highest drop in ICC was observed for financial abuse (from 9.5% to 4.3%).

    Conclusion There is a societal and community level dimension that adds information to individual variability in explaining country differences in elder abuse, highlighting underlying socioeconomic inequalities leading to such behavior.

  • 32.
    Fraga, S
    et al.
    Universidade do Porto, Portugal.
    Soares, Joaquim J.F.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Melchiorre, MG
    Center for Socioeconomic Research on Aging, Ancona, Italy.
    Barros, H
    Universidade do Porto, Portugal.
    Eslami, Bahareh
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Ioannidi-Kapolou, E
    National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece.
    Lindert, J
    University of Emden, Emden, Germany.
    Macassa, Gloria
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Stankunas, M
    Lithuanian University of Health Sciences; University of Griffith, Australia.
    Torres-Gonzales, F
    University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
    Viitasara, Eija
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Lifetime Abuse and Quality of Life among Older People2017In: Health & Social Work, ISSN 0360-7283, E-ISSN 1545-6854, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 215-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Few studies have evaluated the impact of lifetime abuse on quality of life (QoL) among older adults. By using a multinational study authors aimed to assess the subjective perception of QoL among people who have reported abuse during the course of their lifetime. The respondents (N = 4,467; 2,559 women) were between the ages of 60 and 84 years and living in seven European countries (Germany, Greece, Italy, Lithuania, Portugal, Spain, and Sweden). Lifetime abuse was assessed by using a structured questionnaire that allowed to assess lifetime experiences of abuse. QoL was assessed with the World Health Organization Quality of Life–Old module. After adjustment for potential confounders, authors found that to have had any abusive experience decreased the score of sensory abilities. Psychological abuse was associated with lower autonomy and past, present, and future activities. Physical abuse with injuries significantly decreased social participation. Intimacy was also negatively associated with psychological abuse, physical abuse with injury, and sexual abuse. The results of this study provide evidence that older people exposed to abuse during their lifetime have a significant reduction in QoL, with several QoL domains being negatively affected.

  • 33.
    Graham-Kevan, Nicola
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Zacarias, AE
    Eduardo Mondlane Univ, Fac Med, Maputo, Mozambique .
    Soares, Joaquim J. F.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Investigating Violence and Control Dyadically in a Help-seeking Sample from Mozambique2012In: Scientific World Journal, ISSN 1537-744X, E-ISSN 1537-744X, p. Art. no. 590973-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A sample of 1442 women attending a Forensic Healthcare Service provided information on their own and their partners' use of controlling behaviors, partner violence, and sexual abuse, as well as their own experiences of childhood abuse. Using Johnson's typology, the relationships were categorized as Nonviolent, Intimate Terrorism, or Situational Couple Violence. Findings suggest that help-seeking women’s experiences of intimate violence may be diverse, with their roles ranging from victim to perpetrator.1. Introduc

  • 34.
    Grossi et al, G
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Soares, Joaquim
    Karolinska institutet.
    Lundberg, Ulf
    Gender differences in coping with musculoskeletal pain2000In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 305-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gender differences in coping with musculoskeletal pain were cross-sectionally investigated, using questionnaires (Coping Strategies Questionnaire), in 446 Swedish patients (mean age 46 years, 72% women) seeking care for their ailments. Compared to male patients, women reported more disability, a larger consumption of analgesics, more work strain, higher levels of posttraumatic stress reactions, a lower self-esteem, and higher scores for the Coping Strategies Questionnaire indexes: diverting attention, praying/hoping, catastrophizing, increased behavioural activity, and pain behaviours. All gender differencesin coping were ruled out in multivariate analyses, except for the association between the interaction term Gender x Posttraumatic Stress Reactions and Catastrophizing. Among women, catastrophizing was positively associated with posttraumatic stress reactions, perceived disability, and the number of previous treatments for pain.Nosuch associations were found among men. Women’s poorer capacity to cope with musculoskeletal pain is related to higher level of emotional distress, greater disability, and a history of treatments for pain.

  • 35.
    Grossi et al, G
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Soares, Joaquim
    Karolinska institutet.
    Ängeslevä, Jocelyne
    Perski, Aleksander
    Psychosocial correlates of long-term sick-leave among patients with musculoskeletal pain1999In: Pain, ISSN 0304-3959, E-ISSN 1872-6623, Vol. 80, no 3, p. 607-620Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Grossi, Georgio
    et al.
    Inst Stressforskning Stockholms universitet.
    Thomten, Johanna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Fandino-Losada, Andres
    Department of Public Health, Karolinska Institute.
    Soares, Joaquim J.F.
    Department of Public Health, Karolinska Institute.
    Sundin, Örjan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Does burnout predict changes in pain experiences among women living in Sweden?: A longitudinal study2009In: Stress and Health, ISSN 1532-3005, E-ISSN 1532-2998, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 297-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study investigated the associations between burnout—conceptualized as a syndrome of emotional exhaustion/physical fatigue and cognitive weariness—and pain parameters (overall pain, pain sites, intensity and frequency, and perceived disability) among 2,300 women living in Stockholm County. The study was a longitudinal panel survey with two assessments by means of questionnaires, 1 year apart. After adjustment for socio-demographic and work characteristics, smoking, psychological distress, physical health and basal pain parameters, T1 levels of burnout and/or their change scores were the most important predictors of overall pain, neck–shoulderpain, back pain and disability. Pain frequency was related to increases in tension and listlessness.

    The results indicated that burnout contributes to the onset and maintenance of pain and to the functional impairment that it causes. Further studies are needed to evaluate the extent to which pain and burnout, may be mutually reinforcing.

     

  • 37.
    Hashemi, Esmatossadat
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Mohammadi, R
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Soares, Joaquim
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Safe community evaluation in terms of child safety2012In: Injury Prevention, ISSN 1353-8047, E-ISSN 1475-5785, Vol. 18, no Suppl 1, p. A42-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Evaluation of child safety in designated SC is still a neglected indicator.

    Aims The purpose was to introduce a comprehensive model to conduct SC evaluation in terms of child safety.

    Methods Applications of designated SC with emphasis on child safety were reviewed. Besides, Pubmed and Embase were searched to find scientific articles of child safety evaluation.

    Results Key ways of child safety evaluation can be summed up as follows: In order to evaluate the impact of SC on child safety, quasi experimental study with emphasis on safe home, school, street, sport place and other environments is conducted to compare SC and control community at designation and re-designation time. When it comes to do outcome evaluation, in another quasi experimental study, incidence, severity and burden of child injuries are assessed in SC and control community by four household surveys where there is no data registry. Besides WHO and CDC questionnaires, delphi technique is an useful alternative to prepare questionnaires.

    Contribution to the Field Importance of child safety among growing number of SC has given rise to the necessity of a practical method for child safety evaluation in SCs.

  • 38.
    Hashemi, Esmatossadat
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Zangi, Mahdi
    Shahid Beheshti Univ Med Sci, Tehran, Iran.
    Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun
    Tabriz Univ Med Sci, Tabriz, Iran.
    Soares, Joaquim
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Viitasara, Eija
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Mohammadi, Reza
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm.
    Population-based epidemiology of non-fatal injuries in Tehran, Iran2018In: Health Promotion Perspectives, ISSN 2228-6497, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 127-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Our aim in this survey was to explore descriptive epidemiology of injuries in Tehran in 2012 and to report the recalled estimates of injury incidence rates.

    Methods: A population survey was conducted in Tehran during 2012, within which a total of 8626 participants were enrolled. The cluster sampling was used to draw samples in 100 clusters with a pre-specified cluster size of 25 households per cluster. Data were collected on demographic features, accident and injury characteristics based on the International Classification of Diseases (ICD10).

    Results: A total of 618 injuries per 3 months were reported, within which 597 cases (96.6%)were unintentional injuries. More than 82% of all injuries were those caused by exposure to inanimate mechanical forces, traffic accidents, falls and burns. Above 80% of the traffic injuries happened among men (P<0.001). About 43% of the unintentional injuries were mild injuries.After the age of 40, women, unlike men, had higher risks for being injured. The estimated annual incidence rate for all types of injuries was 284.8 per 1000 (95% CI: 275.4-294.4) and for unintentional injuries was 275.2 per 1000.

    Conclusion: Injuries are major health problems in Tehran with a highly reported incidence. The status is not substantially improved over the recent years which urges the need to be adequately and emergently addressed. As the incidence rate was estimated based on participant recalls, the real incidence rate may even be higher than those reported in the current study.

  • 39.
    Hiswåls, Anne-Sofie
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Department of Occupational and Public Health Science, University of Gävle, Sweden .
    Ghilagaber, Gebrenegus
    Department of Statistics, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Walander, Anders
    Department of Occupational and Public Health Science, University of Gävle, Sweden .
    Wijk, Katarina
    Community Medicine, Gävleborg County Council, Gävle, Sweden .
    Öberg, Peter
    Department of Social Work and Psychology, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Soares, Joaquim J. F.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Macassa, Gloria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Department of Occupational and Public Health Science, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Employment Status and Inequalities in Self-Reported Health2014In: Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Public Health, ISSN 2282-2305, E-ISSN 2282-0930, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of employment status on self-reported health in gävleborg county.Methods: The study used data from the 2010 health in equal terms survey, a cross-sectional survey carried out in gävleborg county in sweden. a total of 4,245 individuals, aged 16–65 years were included in the analyses. descriptive and logistic regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between employment status and self-reported healthResults: Individuals outside the labour market had odds of poor health of 2.64 (cl 2.28–3.05) compared to their employed counterparts. controlling for other covariates reduced the risk slightly to 2.10 (1.69-2.60), but remained statistically significant. In addition, other variables were associated with self-reported poor health.Conclusions: This study found a statistically significant association between being outside the labour market and poor self-reported health. The relation was explained partially by socio-economic and demographic variables. More studies, in particular longitudinal, are needed to further investigate the observed relationships. Policy-makers within the gävleborg county need to pay attention to the health status of those out of work, especially during times of combined economic and labour market fluctuations.Results of the study suggest the need to pay attention to the health status of those outside the labour market, especially during times of economic hardship.

  • 40.
    Hiswåls, Anne-Sofie
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Ghilagaber, Gebrenegus
    Department of Statistics, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Wijk, Katarina
    Gävleborg County Council, Gävle, Sweden .
    Öberg, Peter
    Department of Social Work and Psychology, University of Gävle, Sweden .
    Soares, Joaquim
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Macassa, Gloria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Employment status and suicidal ideation during economic recession2015In: Health Science Journal, ISSN 1791-809X, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Suicide is a public health problem and an important indicator of severe mental ill-health. Thus, identifying risk factors for suicidal ideation is a public health priority. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between employment status and suicidal ideation in Gävleborg County. Method: The study used data from the 2010 Health in Equal Terms survey, a cross-sectional survey carried out in Gävleborg County in Sweden. A total of 4,245 individuals, aged 16–65 years were included in the analyses. Descriptive and logistic regression analyses were carried out to assess the relationship between employment status and suicidal ideation. Results: Individuals outside the labour market had odds of suicidal ideation of 4.21 (CI 3.14-5.64) compared to their employed counterparts. Controlling for other covariates, reduced the risk from 4.21(CI 3.14-5.64) in model I, to 1.73 (CI 1.16- 2.57) in model IV, but remained statistically significant. In addition, other variables were associated with suicidal ideation. Conclusion: There was a statistically significant association between being out of work and suicidal ideation. The association was explained partly by demographic, socio-economic and self-reported psychological variables. Results of the study suggest the need for primary prevention strategies among those out of the labour market, especially during times of economic hardship.

  • 41.
    Hiswåls, Anne-Sofie
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Department of Occupational and Public Health Science, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Ghilagaber, Gebrenegus
    Avdelningenför statistik, Stockholms universitet, Department of statistics, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Wijk, Katarina
    Samhällsmedicin, Landstinget Gävleborg, Community Medicine,Gävleborg County Council, Sweden.
    Öberg, Peter
    Avdelningen för socialt arbete och psykologi, Högskolan i Gävle, Department of Social work and Psychology, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Soares, Joaquim
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Macassa, Gloria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Department of Occupational and Public Health Science, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Inequalities and Suicide Ideation during Recession Times2014In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 24, no S2, p. 361-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Hiswåls, Anne-Sofie
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. University of Gävle.
    Walander, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Institutionen för folkhälsovetenskap, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Public Health Science, Karolinska Institutet.
    Soares, Joaqim
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Macassa, Gloria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. University of Gävle; Karolinska Institute.
    Employment Status, Anxiety and Depression in a Municipal Context2017In: Research in Health Science, ISSN 2470-6213, Vol. 2, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: This  study  aimed  to  investigate  the  prevalence  of  anxiety  and  depression  by  employment status among a sample of the working age population residing in Gävle Municipality in Sweden.

    Methods:  A  total  of  241  persons  completed  a  self-administered  postal  questionnaire  in  the  baseline survey  of  the  Gävle  Household,  Labour  Market  and  Health  Outcomes  (GHOLDH)  survey,  which collected  information  on  the  employment  status  and  psychological  health  (anxiety  and  depression) among persons aged 18-65 years. Descriptive and multivariate analyses were performed.

    Results:  The  prevalence  and  risk  of  anxiety  and  depression  were  high  among  people  who  were  out  of work. In the multiple regression analysis, compared to employed people, those who were not employed had a risk of anxiety of 7.76 (5.97-9.75) and 4.67 (3.60-5.74) for depression.

    Conclusion: The prevalence of anxiety and depression was higher among those who were out of labour marketas compared to those employed. Furthermore, people who were out of work had a higher risk of anxiety and depression. The odds were slightly higher for anxiety than for depression.

  • 43. Högberg, G
    et al.
    Pagani, M
    Sundin, Örjan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Soares, J
    Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Social Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Åberg-Wistedt, A
    Tärnell, B
    Hällström, T
    Treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder with eye movement desensitization and reprocessing: Outcome is stable in 35-month follow-up2008In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 159, no 1-2, p. 101-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that may follow major psychological trauma. The disorder is longstanding, even chronic, and there is a need for effective treatment. The most effective short-term treatments are cognitive behavioural therapy and eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR). Twenty subjects with chronic PTSD following occupational health hazards from "person under train" accidents or assault at work were treated with five sessions of EMDR. They were assessed with psychometric scales and diagnostic interviews before treatment, directly after treatment, at 8 months, and at 35 months after the end of Therapy. The primary outcome variable was full diagnosis of PTSD according to the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. Results from interview-based and self-evaluation psychometric scales were used as secondary outcome variables. Immediately following treatment, the patients were divided up into two groups, initial remitters (12 of 20) and non-remitters (8 of 20). There were no drop-outs during therapy, but three patients withdrew during follow-up. The initial result was maintained at the 35-month follow-up. The secondary outcome variables also showed a significant immediate change towards normality that was stable during the long-term follow-up. After 3

  • 44. Högberg, Göran
    et al.
    Pagani, Marco
    Sundin, Örjan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Soares, Joaquim
    Åberg-Wistedt, Anna
    Tärnell, Berit
    Hällström, Tore
    On treatment with eye movement desensitization and reprocessing of chronic post-traumatic stress disorder in public transportation workers: a randomized controlled trial2007In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 61, no 1, p. 54-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) investigated a variety of treatments and included mostly patients victims of sexual and combat assault. This study aimed to determine the short-term efficacy of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) in occupation-based PTSD. Employees of the public transportation system in Stockholm, who had been experiencing a person-under-train accident or had been assaulted at work were recruited. Subjects with trauma exposure since more than 3 months but less than 6 years were included. Twenty-four subjects who fulfilled the DSM-IV criteria for PTSD were randomized to either EMDR therapy (n=13) or waiting list (WL, n=11). They were assessed pre-treatment and shortly after completion of treatment or WL period. The pre-defined primary outcome variable was full PTSD diagnosis. Secondary outcome variables were the results of various psychometric scales. Twelve participants began and completed five sessions of EMDR and nine completed the WL. After therapy, eight subjects in the EMDR group (67%) and one (11%) in WL did not fulfil the criteria for PTSD diagnosis (difference, P=0.02). Among the secondary outcome variables, there were significant differences post-treatment between the groups EMDR/WL in Global Assessment of Function (GAF) score and Hamilton Depression (HAM-D) score. This study indicates that EMDR has a short-term effect on PTSD in public transportation workers exposed to occupational traumatic events. Such intensive and brief therapy might be further validated in larger samples of exposed workers with longer periods of follow-up.

  • 45. Innocent, M
    et al.
    Ndonko, F
    Ngo’o, G
    Soares, Joaquim J. F.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Macassa, Gloria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Breaking the Silence: Understanding the practice of Breast ironing in Cameroon2012In: African Journal of Health Sciences, ISSN 1022-9272, E-ISSN 2306-1987, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 232-237Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46. Jablonska, B
    et al.
    Soares, Joaquim
    Smärta och sociala förhållanden bland kvinnor2003Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund

    : År 2002 fick Enheten för Psykisk Hälsa vid Samhällsmedicin

    i uppdrag av Hälso- och sjukvårdsnämnden (HSN) och sjukvårdsområdena

    att undersöka kvinnors situation i Stockholm med avseende

    på bland annat förekomst av smärta. I uppdraget betonades också att

    kvinnornas situation skulle jämföras med en grupp män. Denna

    undersökning ingår i en serie rapporter om kvinnors hälsa.

    Syften

    med undersökningen var att: (i) kartlägga och beskriva smärtupplevelser

    bland kvinnor och män; (ii) jämföra kvinnor och män med

    eller utan smärta med avseende på sociodemografisk och ekonomisk

    situation; och (iii) identifiera riskfaktorer för smärta bland alla deltagare.

    Metod

    : 3616 slumpmässigt utvalda kvinnor mellan 18-64 år boende i

    Stockholm (2276 med smärta och 1340 utan smärta) och en jämförelsegrupp

    av 520 slumpmässigt utvalda män (293 med smärta och 227 utan

    smärta) deltog i undersökningen. Deltagarna besvarade en enkät som

    mätte sådana områden som ekonomisk situation och smärtupplevelser.

    Studien var av tvärsnittsdesign och data insamlades under åtta

    konsekutiva veckor.

    Resultat

    : De univariata analyserna visade att kvinnor med smärta i

    jämförelse med andra deltagare oftare var invandrare, frånskilda och

    anställda inom sådana yrken som inte sällan innebär höga psykiska

    och/eller fysiska påfrestningar (t.ex. hälso- och sjukvård). Vidare

    försörjde de sig i större utsträckning genom sjukbidrag, hade mer

    ekonomiska problem och hade oftare varit sjukskrivna året innan

    undersökningen. Män med smärta å andra sidan var oftare ingenjörer/

    arkitekter/jurister, industriarbetare eller anställda inom olika tjänsteyrken

    (t.ex. städare). Männen generellt hade haft längre perioder av

    arbetslöshet under sin yrkeskarriär och försörjde sig i större utsträckning

    genom arbetslöshetsersättning. Personer med smärta var signifikant

    äldre än smärtfria deltagare.

    Kvinnor med smärta i jämförelse med män med smärta hade oftare ont

    i hela kroppen, ont i huvudet, i nacken/skuldrorna, i övre extremiteterna,

    i magen och i höfterna. Vidare upplevde de smärtan som mer intensiv,

    komplex och både djup och ytlig. De led också i större utsträckning

    än män av smärtan nästan varje dag, hade större smärtrelaterad funktionsnedsättning

    och använde oftare smärtstillande och antidepressiva

    läkemedel samt naturläkemedel. Män med smärta rapporterade å andra

    sidan oftare smärta i bröstkorgen och beskrev smärtans sensation som

    djup.

    Smärta, enligt logistisk regressionsanalys, var inte associerade med kön

    utan med ökande ålder, låg utbildningsnivå, sjukskrivning, ekonomisk

    belastning och att vara anställd inom industri-/tjänste-/utbildningsoch

    sjukvårdssektorn.

    Slutsats

    : Kvinnor med smärta hade generellt en sämre socioekonomisk

    situation än andra deltagare. Kvinnor med smärta i jämförelse med män

    med smärta tenderade att konsumera mer mediciner, i synnerhet antiinflammatoriska

    och antidepressiva läkemedel, och i flera avseenden

    rapporterade en allvarligare smärtproblematik. Sambandet mellan att

    vara kvinna och ha smärta har inte påvisats. Förekomst av smärta var

    relaterad till bland annat sådana faktorer som sjukskrivning och

    ekonomisk belastning.

    Föreliggande rapport tyder på att smärta är ett betydande problem. De

    behandlingsstrategier som ofta används för att hantera smärtproblem

    (t.ex. sjukgymnastik) upplevdes inte vara effektiva. Andra metoder

    (t.ex. beteendeorienterade terapier) borde utprövas och övriga underliggande

    faktorer som kan bidra till ohälsan (t.ex. ekonomiska problem)

    måste beaktas.

  • 47. Jablonska, Beata
    et al.
    Soares, Joaquim J F
    Sundin, Örjan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Pain among women: Association with socioeconomics and work conditions2006In: European Journal of Pain, ISSN 1090-3801, E-ISSN 1532-2149, Vol. 10, no 5, p. 435-447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined pain prevalence (general/body sites) and its characteristics/consequences among a randomised sample of women from the general population between 18 and 64 years (n=3,616). We also scrutinised associations between pain and various factors (e.g. socio-economic) by means of multivariate logistic/linear regression analyses. The women completed a questionnaire assessing various areas (e.g. pain). The design was cross-sectional and data were collected during 8 consecutive weeks. Sixty-three per cent of women reported pain during the last 3 months, of which 65% during more than 3 months. The multivariate analyses revealed associations between various socio-economic factors (e.g. financial strain) and pain in general/all studied body sites. In addition, psychosocial work conditions (i.e. work strain and social support) were significantly related to pain. Moreover, the multivariate analyses conducted among women with pain indicated relationships between socio-economic/psychosocial work conditions, and pain characteristics (e.g. intensity) and consequences (i.e. disability). A large number of women from the general population suffer from pain, in particularly prolonged pain. Women in a deprived socio-economic situation not only run a higher pain risk, but also experience their pain as more severe/disabling than their more privileged counterparts. Improvements of, for example, the socio-economic status among women living in deprived social and material circumstances, along with improved working environment may be crucial to reduce women's pain problems.

  • 48.
    Kellman, PJ
    et al.
    Swarthmore College, USA.
    Von Hofsten, C
    Uppsala University.
    Soares, Joaquim
    Uppsala universitet.
    Concurrent motion in infant event perception1987In: Infant Behavior and Development, ISSN 0163-6383, E-ISSN 1879-0453, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Infant sensitivity to motion relationships specifying certain complex events, such as a person walking, has recently been demonstrated, but the perceptual principles underlying early event perception are not well understood. Retinal motion toward a common point (concurrent motion) specifies translation in depth to adult perceivers in the absence of conflicting information (Börjesson & von Hofsten, 1973). We tested this principle of event perception with 28 16-week-old infants. One group was habituated in a dark room to a concurrent motion: three points of light moving in a frontoparallel plane toward and away from a central point (not seen). After habituation, the room was illuminated, and looking time was tested to alternate presentations of two displays. In one display (depth motion), three lights were attached to a triangle actually moving in depth; in the other display (surface motion), the three lights moved visibly along the surface of a fronto-parallel stationary triangle. If concurrent motion, in the absence of conflicting information, specifies motion in depth to infants, they were expected to look longer after habituation at the surface motion display. A control group tested infants' relative interest in the two test displays with no prior habituation period.

    Control-group infants marginally preferred the depth movement display. The habituation group responded three times as much to the surface motion display, suggesting that motion in depth had been perceived during habituation. Specification of motion in depth by concurrency of relative proximal stimulus motions seems to be an operative principle in infants' perception; moreover, at least some principles of early event perception are unrelated to person perception or biological motion. The relation of these results to recent findings in infant object perception is discussed.

  • 49.
    Kluge, U
    et al.
    Charite, Dept Psychiat & Psychotherapy, CCM, D-10117 Berlin, Germany.
    Bogic, M
    Queen Mary Univ London, Unit Social & Community Psychiat, Newham Ctr Mental Hlth, London E13 8SP, England.
    Devillé, W
    NIVEL Netherlands Inst Hlth Serv Res, NL-3500 BN Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Greacen, T
    Etab Publ Sante Maison Blanche, F-75019 Paris, France.
    Dauvrin, M
    Catholic Univ Louvain, Inst Hlth & Soc IRSS, B-1200 Brussels, Belgium.
    Dias, S
    Univ Nova Lisboa, Inst Higiene & Med Trop, P-1349008 Lisbon, Portugal.
    Gaddini, A
    Laziosanita ASP Publ Hlth Agcy Lazio Reg, I-00198 Rome, Italy.
    Koitzsch Jensen, N
    Univ Copenhagen, Hlth Serv Res Unit, Dept Publ Hlth, Danish Res Ctr Migrat Ethn & Hlth MESU, DK-1014 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Ioannidi- Kapolou, E
    Natl Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Sociol, Athens 11521, Greece.
    Mertaniemi, R
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welf THL, Dept Mental Hlth & Subst Abuse Serv, FIN-00271 Helsinki, Finland.
    Puipcinós i Riera, R
    Agcy Publ Hlth Barcelona, Barcelona 08023, Spain.
    Sandhu, S
    Queen Mary Univ London, Unit Social & Community Psychiat, Newham Ctr Mental Hlth, London E13 8SP, England.
    Soares, Joaquim J. F.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Stankunas, M
    Griffith Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Hlth Serv Management Dept, Southport, Qld 4222, Australia.
    Straßmayr, C.
    Ludwig Boltzmann Inst Social Psychiat, A-1090 Vienna, Austria.
    Welbel, M
    Inst Psychiat & Neurol, PL-02957 Warsaw, Poland.
    Heinz, A.
    Charite, Dept Psychiat & Psychotherapy, CCM, D-10117 Berlin, Germany.
    Priebe, S
    Queen Mary Univ London, Unit Social & Community Psychiat, Newham Ctr Mental Hlth, London E13 8SP, England.
    Sarvary, A
    Debrecen Univ Med, Fac Hlth Sci Nyiregyhaza, H-4400 Nyiregyhaza, Hungary.
    Health services and the treatment of immigrants : data on service use, interpreting services and immigrant staff members in services across Europe2012In: European psychiatry, ISSN 0924-9338, E-ISSN 1778-3585, Vol. 27, no Suppl 2, p. 56-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    The number of immigrants using health services has increased across Europe. For assessing and improving the quality of care provided for immigrants, information is required on how many immigrants use services, what interpreting services are provided and whether staff members are from immigrant groups.

    METHODS:

    Structured interviews were conducted with 15 health services (9 primary care, 3 emergency departments, 3 mental health) located in areas with high immigrant populations in each of 16 European countries (n=240). Responses were collected on the availability of data on service use by immigrant patients, the provision of interpreting services and immigrant staff members.

    RESULTS:

    Data on service use by immigrants were recorded by only 15% of services. More than 40% of services did not provide any form of interpreting service and 54% of the services reported having no immigrant staff. Mental health services were more likely to use direct interpreting services, and both mental health and emergency services were more likely to have immigrant staff members.

    DISCUSSION:

    For assessing and improving the quality of care provided for immigrants, there is a need to improve the availability of data on service use by immigrants in health services throughout Europe and to provide more consistent access to interpreting services.

  • 50. Lawoko, S
    et al.
    Soares, Joaquim JF
    Distress and hopelessness among parents of children with congenital heartdisease, parents of children with other diseases and parents of healthy children2002In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 52, no 4, p. 193-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: We examined differences in distress (i.e., depression, anxiety, and somatisation) and hopelessness (e.g., suicide ideation) among parents of congenital heart disease (CHD) children (PCCHD, n=1092), parents of children with other diseases (PCOD, n=112), and parents of healthy children (PHC, n=293). In addition, we determined the proportion of parents in each group whose scores in distress and hopelessness, respectively, exceeded norms for psychiatric outpatients (POPN) and depressed people, and identified determinants of distress and hopelessness among all parents, and the PCCHD. Method: The parents completed a questionnaire about such areas as distress and hopelessness. The design was cross-sectional and data were collected during 20 consecutive days. Results: PCCHD were generally at higher risk of distress and hopelessness. A significant number of parents, in particular PCCHD, reported levels of distress and hopelessness within/above POPN and depressed people, respectively. Mothers within all parent groups had higher levels of distress and hopelessness than fathers, with the highest levels among mothers of children with CHD compared to mothers in the other groups. Fathers of children with CHD were doing worse than fathers belonging to the other groups. There were no differences between PCOD and PHC. Variables such as employment status and financial situation explained more of the variation in distress and hopelessness among parents than the diseases of their children. Conclusion: We corroborated previous findings and provide new insights into the experiences of PCCHD that may be of importance when considering intervention. Further research concerning the parents, in particular PCCHD, at risk of developing psychosocial problems is needed.

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