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  • 1.
    Alecrim, Viviane
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andres, Britta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Zhang, Renyun
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Blomquist, Nicklas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Forsberg, Sven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Engström, Ann-Christine
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Shimizu, Kenichi
    Umeå University.
    Andersson, Mattias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Exfoliation of MoS2 for paper based applications2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Alecrim, Viviane
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andres, Britta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Zhang, Renyun
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Shimizu, Kenichi
    Umeå University.
    Forsberg, Sven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Mattias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Exfoliated MoS2 for paper based supercapacitors and photodetectors2014In: Collection of Extent Abstracts, 2014, p. 437-438Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Alecrim, Viviane
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Mattias, Andersson
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Flexographic ink film’s resistance to inkjet ink’s solvent flow in Hybrid Printing2011In: International Conference on Digital Printing Technologies: Technical Programs and Proceedings / [ed] IS&T, The Society for Imaging Science and Technology, 2011, p. 79-85Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through Darcy’s permeability coefficient, K, one can evaluate the resistance of a flexographic ink film to the solvent penetration of an inkjet ink through a paper substrate. This resistance plays an important role for the print quality in hybrid printing applications where flexography and inkjet printing are combined. If this resistance is too high, K→0, the inkjet ink’s solvent would not penetrate into the substrate and ink smearing would occur resulting in poor printability.

    Paper substrates were printed in a flexographic laboratory printing press. The flexographic printing dot area was varied to evaluate the influence of the full tone and halftone areas on K. These print outs were employed as filters for pigmented inkjet water based inks in a filtration setup. The inks had different pigment’s mean particle size which allowed us to address the influence of this parameter on the filter cake build up and consequently, its impact on K. The dot area had indeed an impact in the ink’s solvent penetration as we observed that the higher the dot area, the lower the K value, meaning that the resistance for ink´s solvent flow was higher. The pigment’s mean particle size also showed influence on K, as we observed that the bigger the pigment particles, the higher the K.

     The substrates were selected after a screening based on inkjet ink absorption speed evaluated through a print rub off test and line width measurements of printed lines.

    We also printed the pre-printed flexography images using a KM 512 piezoelectric printing head and one of the inks used during filtration to evaluate the inkjet printing quality for this hybrid printing approach. We observed wider, less blurry and ragged lines with increased dot area. No ink smearing was observed for the print outs.

  • 4.
    Alecrim, Viviane
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Zhang, Renyun
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Mattias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Hakan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Photoconductivity of bulk and liquid processed MoS22014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Alecrim, Viviane
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Zhang, Renyun
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andres, Britta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Dahlström, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Norgren, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Andersson, Mattias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Exfoliated Layered Materials for Digital Fabrication2015In: NIP & Digital Fabrication Conference, 2015, Vol. 1, p. 192-194Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We introduced an exfoliation method of MoS2 in a 3% solution of sodium dodecyl surfactant at high concentration (i.e. 2 g/L). The bulk MoS2 was thinned by mechanical exfoliation between sand papers and the resulting powder was used to prepare dispersions by liquid exfoliation through probe sonication. The resulting dispersion consisted of very thin MoS2 nanosheets in surfactant solution with average lateral size around 126 nm. This may be interesting for applications in inkjet printed electronics.

  • 6.
    Forsberg, Viviane
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Liquid Exfoliation of Molybdenum Disulfide for Inkjet Printing2016Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the discovery of graphene, substantial effort has been put toward the synthesis and production of 2D materials. Developing scalable methods for the production of high-quality exfoliated nanosheets has proved a significant challenge. To date, the most promising scalable method for achieving these materials is through the liquid-based exfoliation (LBE) of nanosheetsin solvents. Thin films of nanosheets in dispersion can be modified with additives to produce 2D inks for printed electronics using inkjet printing. This is the most promising method for the deposition of such materials onto any substrate on an industrial production level. Although well-developed metallic and organic printed electronic inks exist on the market, there is still a need to improve or develop new inks based on semiconductor materials such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) that are stable, have good jetting conditions and deliver good printing quality.The inertness and mechanical properties of layered materials such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) make them ideally suited for printed electronics and solution processing. In addition,the high electron mobility of the layered semiconductors, make them a candidate to become a high-performance semiconductor material in printed electronics. Together, these features make MoS2 a simple and robust material with good semiconducting properties that is also suitable for solution coating and printing. It is also environmentally safe.The method described in this thesis could be easily employed to exfoliate many types of 2D materials in liquids. It consists of two exfoliation steps, one based on mechanical exfoliation of the bulk powder utilizing sand paper, and the other inthe liquid dispersion, using probe sonication to liquid-exfoliate the nanosheets. The dispersions, which were prepared in surfactant solution, were decanted, and the supernatant was collected and used for printing tests performed with a Dimatix inkjetprinter. The printing test shows that it is possible to use the MoS2 dispersion as a printed electronics inkjet ink and that optimization for specific printer and substrate combinations should be performed. There should also be advances in ink development, which would improve the drop formation and break-off at the inkjet printing nozzles, the ink jetting and, consequently, the printing quality.

  • 7.
    Forsberg, Viviane
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Engholm, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Thungström, Göran
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Zhang, Renyun
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Norgren, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Photodetector of multilayer exfoliated MoS2 deposited on polyimide films2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We fabricated a photodetector based on multilayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) by micromechanical cleavage of a molybdenite crystal using a polyimide film. We deposited 40 nm of gold by vacuum sputtering and copper tape was used for the contacts.  Without any surface treatment, we achieved high responsivity at different incident optical power. The calculated responsivity was 23 mA/W of incident optical power in the range between 400 and 800 nm. For the responsivity measurement it was estimated that MoS2 have a bandgap of 1.6 eV, which lies between monolayer and multilayer films. The thickness of the MoS2 thin film was determined by Raman spectroscopy evaluating the difference between the in plane  and out of plane  Raman modes. The measurement of IV curves indicated Ohmic contacts in respect to the Au regardless of the incident optical power. Our device fabrication was much simpler than previous reported devices and can be used to test the light absorption and luminescence capabilities of exfoliated MoS2.

  • 8.
    Forsberg, Viviane
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Zhang, Renyun
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Cellulose stabilizers for 2D materials inkjet inks2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To date, the most promising scalable method for achieving 2D materials dispersions is through liquidbasedexfoliation of nanosheets in solvents. We study the use of high throughput shear exfoliation insteadof sonication to exfoliate water dispersions of MoS2 using environmental friendly stabilizers based oncellulose. The resulted dispersion was then concentrated and inkjet printed on a flexible substrate. We usedethyl cellulose, cellulose nanofibers (CNF) and ultra-fine cellulose nanofibers (UF-CNF). The stability wasevaluated by measuring the differences in concentration over time. The particle size distribution (PSD) ofthe dispersed particles was evaluated using statistical methods applied to SEM images of the dispersions(See Fig 1 and 2). The zeta potential and the mechanisms of stabilization involved was evaluated (See Fig4). All three stabilizers appear to work very well for MoS2 nanosheets even though the mechanisms ofstabilization were different i.e. steric stabilization for MoS2-EC and electrostatic stabilization for MoS2-CNF and MoS2-UF-CNF dispersions. For the MoS2-EC dispersions we achieved a broader PSD (Fig. 1)and higher stability. Thin nanosheets was observed from the SEM image of MoS2-EC dispersions depositedonto cellulose filters by vacuum filtration (Fig. 5) which demonstrated that the exfoliation technique usedwas successful. The estimated concentration of the MoS2-EC dispersion after 8 days of sample preparationwas 0.24 mg/mL, 77% of the initial concentration (see Fig. 6) and it was relatively steady after 40 days ofsample preparation (0.22 mg/mL). To adjust the concentration and the viscosity of the MoS2-EC dispersion,we concentrated it using a rotary evaporator solvent exchange technique. For this we used terpineol andadjusted the viscosity using ethanol. This paper presents the results of an inkjet 2D material ink usingenvironmental friendly components different than previous 2D materials inks that used organic solvents orwater based dispersions containing surfactants.

  • 9.
    Forsberg, Viviane
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Maslik, Jan
    Tomas Bata University.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Dahlström, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Toivakka, Martti
    Åbo Akademi University.
    Koppolu, Rajesh
    Åbo Akademi University.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Norgren, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Printability of functional inkjet inks onto commercial inkjet substrates and a taylor made pigmented coated paper2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Printed electronics are of increasing interest. The substrates used have primarily been plastics although the interest for cellulose-based substrates is increasing due to the environmental aspect as well as cost. The requirements of substrates for electronically active inks differs from graphical inks and therefore we have investigated a custom-made pigment based coated paper and compared it to commercial photo-papers and a coated PE film.

    Our goal with the study of different substrates was to select the most suitable substrate to print water based 2D materials inkjet inks for flexible electronics.

    The discovery of graphene, a layered material achieved from the exfoliation of graphite, has resulted in the study of other materials with similar properties to cover areas where graphene could not be used due to the absence of a bandgap in the material. For example in thin film transistors (TFT) a semiconductor layer is essential to enable turn on and off the device. This semiconductor layer can be achieved using various materials but particular interest have been dedicated to abundant and cheap 2D materials such as the transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) molybdenum disulfide (MoS2). To date, most of the dispersions based on TMDs use organic solvents or water solutions of surfactants. Previously we focus on the study of environmental friendly inks produced by liquid phase exfoliation (LPE) of MoS2 in water using cellulose stabilizers such as ethyl cellulose (EC), cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) and nanofibrilcellulose (NFC). We have study various aspects of the ink fabrication includi  ng pH range, the source of MoS2, nanosheets thickness, particle size distribution,  ink stabilizers, ink concentration, viscosity and surface tension. These inks have very low concentration requiring a number of printing passes to cover the substrate. Therefore the substrate selection is crucial as a large amount of solvent is to be absorb by the substrate. Our goal was to use such an ink to print electrodes of MoS2 into a paper substrate after substrate selection.

    Commercial photo papers, a commercial coated PE film and a tailor made multilayer pigment coated paper substrate were used for the substrate selection analysis.  We print the substrates using a DIMATIX inkjet printer with a 10 pL printing head using the distillated water waveform supplied by the printer manufacturer. The voltage used was 23V and 4 nozzles were used for the print outs. The inkjet ink used was the organic PEDOT:PSS. We printed lines ranging from 1 pixel to 20 pixels with 1, 2 and 3 printing passes. The printing quality was evaluated through measurements of the waviness of the printed lines measured after imaging the printed samples with a SEM microscope. The line width measurement was done using the software from the SEM.

    We also evaluated the structure of the coatings using SEM and topography measurements. The ink penetration through the substrates was evaluated using Raman Spectroscopy. For the pigmented coated sample we measured 4% of ink penetration through the substrate for the 1pxl printed line printed once onto the paper.  Cross-section SEM images of the printed lines were made to visualize the ink penetration into the substrate.

    Regarding the electrical conductivity of the printed samples, the differences in resistivity varying the width of the printed lines and the number of printed passes were evaluated. The resistivity of the printed electrodes was evaluated using the 2-points probe method. Before the resistivity measurements, the printed substrates were heated at 50°C and 100°C for 30 minutes in an oven.

    We choose the PEDOT:PSS ink because it is a low price ink compared to metal nanoparticles inks for printed electronics. The print outs had low resistivity at a few printing passes with no need for sintering at high temperatures. The MoS2 ink has a very high resistance at a few printing passes due to lower coverage of the substrate therefore for this ink these measurements were not possible to be made. The main pigment composition of the paper coatings of the substrates was evaluated using FT-IR and EDX, these data plus the coating structure evaluated by SEM was related to the print quality.

    The best in test papers were used to print MoS2 electrodes. After the printing tests, another step for the optimization of the MoS2 ink properties shall be carried out in future studies for better print quality. We also evaluated the surface energy of the substrates through contact angle measurements to match the surface tension of the PEDOT:PSS ink and later the MoS2 ink. Although the pigmented coated printing substrate did not show better results than the commercial photo papers and PE foil in terms of line quality, it shows the lowest resistivity and sufficient results for low cost recyclable electronics, which do not require high conductivity. Nevertheless, the substrate was very thin and it could even be used in magazines as traditional lightweight coated papers (LWC) are used but with the additional of a printed electronic feature.

  • 10.
    Forsberg, Viviane
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences. KTH, Stockholm; Wallenberg Wood Science Centre, Stockholm.
    Mašlík, Jan
    Tomas Bata University in Zlín, Zlín, Czech Republic.
    Norgren, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Electronic performance of printed PEDOT:PSS lines correlated to the physical and chemical properties of coated inkjet papers2019In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 9, no 41, p. 23925-23938Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PEDOT:PSS organic printed electronics chemical interactions with the ink-receiving layer (IRL) of monopolar inkjet paper substrates and coating color composition were evaluated through Raman spectroscopy mapping in Z (depth) and (XY) direction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Other evaluated properties of the IRLs were pore size distribution (PSD), surface roughness, ink de-wetting, surface energy and the impact of such characteristics on the electronics performance of the printed layers. Resin-coated inkjet papers were compared to a multilayer coated paper substrate that also contained an IRL but did not contain the plastic polyethylene (PE) resin layer. This substrate showed better electronic performance (i.e., lower sheet resistance), which we attributed to the inert coating composition, higher surface roughness and higher polarity of the surface which influenced the de-wetting of the ink. The novelty is that this substrate was rougher and with somewhat lower printing quality but with better electronic performance and the advantage of not having PE in their composite structure, which favors recycling. © 2019 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  • 11.
    Forsberg, Viviane
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Norgren, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Green materials for inkjet printing of 2D materials and transparent electronics2018Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Forsberg, Viviane
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Zhang, Renyun
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Bäckström, Joakim
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Dahlström, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Norgren, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Andres, Britta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Liquid Exfoliation of Layered Materials in Water for Inkjet Printing2016In: Printing for Fabrication 2016: Materials, Applications, and Processes, USA: Curran Associates, Inc., 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    MoS2 is a layered material which is abundant and non-toxic and has been increasingly studied during the last few years as a semiconducting alternative to graphene. While most studies have been performed on single MoS2 nanosheets, for example to demonstrate high-performance electronic transistors, more work is needed to explore the use of MoS2 in printed electronics. The importance of using MoS2 as a printed electronic material could be understood by considering the several orders higher electron mobility in MoS2, even in several nanometer thick layers, compared to the organic and other materials used today. In the few studies performed so far on printing MoS2, the developed dispersions used mainly organic solvents that might be detrimental for the environment. Here, we show an environmentally friendly liquid-based exfoliation method in water where the solution was stabilized by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant. The dispersions consisted of very thin MoS2 nanosheets with average lateral size of about 150 nm, surface tension of 28 mN m-1 and a shelf life of a year. Although both the concentration and viscosity was less than optimal, we were able to inkjet print the MoS2 solution on paper and on PET films, using multiple printing passes. By tuning the concentration/viscosity, this approach might lead to an environmentally friendly MoS2 ink suitable for printed electronics.

  • 13.
    Forsberg, Viviane
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Zhang, Renyun
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Bäckström, Joakim
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Dahlström, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Norgren, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Andres, Britta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Liquid Exfoliation of Layered Materials in Water for Inkjet Printing2016In: Journal of Imaging Science and Technology, ISSN 1062-3701, E-ISSN 1943-3522, Vol. 60, no 4, p. 1-7, article id 040405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    MoS2 is a layered material which is abundant and non-toxic and has been increasingly studied during the last few years as a semiconducting alternative to graphene. While most studies have been performed on single MoS2 nanosheets, for example to demonstrate high-performance electronic transistors, more work is needed to explore the use of MoS2 in printed electronics. The importance of using MoS2 as a printed electronic material could be understood by considering the several orders higher electron mobility in MoS2, even in several nanometer thick layers, compared to the organic and other materials used today. In the few studies performed so far on printing MoS2, the developed dispersions used mainly organic solvents that might be detrimental for the environment. Here, we show an environmentally friendly liquid-based exfoliation method in water where the solution was stabilized by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant. The dispersions consisted of very thin MoS2 nanosheets with average lateral size of about 150 nm, surface tension of 28 mN m(-1), and a shelf life of a year. Although both the concentration and viscosity was less than optimal, we were able to inkjet print the MoS2 solution on paper and on PET films, using multiple printing passes. By tuning the concentration/viscosity, this approach might lead to an environmentally friendly MoS2 ink suitable for printed electronics.

  • 14.
    Forsberg, Viviane
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Zhang, Renyun
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    The Influence of pH on the Stability of Inks of Two-Dimensional Materials for Digital Fabrication2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We aim to achieve stable printable 2D inks with environmental friendly solvents using a surfactant as a stabilizer. This study focuses on the influence of the pH on the stability of the MoS2 dispersionsin acetic acid at concentrations ranging from pH 1 to 5.The effectiveness of liquid-based exfoliation using shear exfoliation was also evaluated though SEM images and resulted in very thin nanosheets. We observed that at pH concentrations higher than 2, the dispersions were more stable.

  • 15.
    Forsberg, Viviane
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Zhang, Renyun
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Towards flexible and cheap printed electronics using inks of exfoliated 2D materials stabilized by cellulose2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Flexible and cheap electronics are needed for simple applications such as sensors and solar cells. To achieve this, thin functional materials should be deposited efficiently to flexible substrates such as paper. A promising method for the deposition of such materials is through inkjet printing that said a stable and printable dispersion is necessary. We achieved this through liquid-based exfoliation of 2D materials in water using shear exfoliation and cellulose stabilizers. The resulted dispersion was then concentrated and inkjet printed on a flexible substrate. We used ethyl cellulose, cellulose nanofibers (CNF) and ultra-fine cellulose nanofibers (UF-CNF). All three stabilizers appear to work very well for MoS2 nanosheets even though the mechanisms of stabilization were different among them. For the MoS2-EC dispersions we achieved a broader PSD and higher dispersion stability. Thin nanosheets were observed from the SEM image of MoS2-EC dispersions deposited onto cellulose filters. The estimated concentration of the MoS2-EC dispersion after 20 days of sample preparation was 0.20 mg/mL. This dispersion was further processed to adjust the concentration and viscosity.  Good coverage of the substrate was achieved after 50 printing passes. If the same technique is applied to other 2D materials such as graphene (conductor) and boro nitride (insulator), a transistor can be fabricated.

  • 16.
    Forsberg, Viviane
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Zhang, Renyun
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Towards stable 2D materials inkjet inks: a study of stabilizers and MoS2 grades2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Forsberg, Viviane
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Zhang, Renyun
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Joakim, Bäckström
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Dahlström, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Andres, Britta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Norgren, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Andersson, Mattias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Exfoliated MoS2 in Water without Additives2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 4, article id 0154522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many solution processing methods of exfoliation of layered materials have been studied during the last few years; most of them are based on organic solvents or rely on surfactants andother funtionalization agents. Pure water should be an ideal solvent, however, it is generallybelieved, based on solubility theories that stable dispersions of water could not be achievedand systematic studies are lacking. Here we describe the use of water as a solvent and thestabilization process involved therein. We introduce an exfoliation method of molybdenumdisulfide (MoS2) in pure water at high concentration (i.e., 0.14±0.01 g L−1). This was achieved by thinning the bulk MoS2by mechanical exfoliation between sand papers and dis-persing it by liquid exfoliation through probe sonication in water. We observed thin MoS2nanosheets in water characterized by TEM, AFM and SEM images. The dimensions of thenanosheets were around 200 nm, the same range obtained in organic solvents. Electropho-retic mobility measurements indicated that electrical charges may be responsible for the sta-bilization of the dispersions. A probability decay equation was proposed to compare thestability of these dispersions with the ones reported in the literature. Water can be used as asolvent to disperse nanosheets and although the stability of the dispersions may not be ashigh as in organic solvents, the present method could be employed for a number of applications where the dispersions can be produced on site and organic solvents are not desirable.

  • 18. Marianne, Klaman
    et al.
    Erik, Blohm
    Per-Åke, Johansson
    Jon, Lofthus
    Viviane, Alecrim
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Jonas, Örtegren
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Hybrid printing - print quality mechanisms when offset and inkjet are combined2011In: Advances in Printing and Media Technology, Vol. XXXVIII / [ed] IARIGAI, International Association of Research Organizations for the Information, Media and Graphic Arts Industrie (IARIGAI), 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Maslik, Jan
    et al.
    Tomas Bata University in Zlin, Czech Republic.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Forsberg, Viviane
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Engholm, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Zhang, Renyun
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    PEDOT:PSS temperature sensor ink-jet printed on paper substrate2018In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 13, article id C12010Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work we present an ink-jet printed temperature sensor consisting of PEDOT:PSSprinted on paper suitable for packaging, flexible electronics and other printed applications. Thesubstrate showed to have a large influence on both the resistance aswell as the temperature sensitivityof the PEDOT:PSS ink. This effect is most likely due to NaCl content in the photo paper coating,which reacts with the PEDOT:PSS. The temperature coefficient of a prepared device of  α= -0.030 relative to room temperature (22°C) was measured, which is higher than compared to for exampleSilicon α = -0.075.

  • 20.
    Mazlik, Jan
    et al.
    Tomas Bata University.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Forsberg, Viviane
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Engholm, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Zhang, Renyun
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Temperature sensor based on PEDOT: PSS ink-jet printed on paper substrate2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Printed electronics is rapidly developing, where more and more components are printable. High speed roll-to-roll processesare preferred for low cost production of flexible electronics. Often, the substrates used for printed electronics are some typeof plastic such as PET or Kapton. An alternative to plastic is to use paper substrate that has the benefits of beingenvironmentally friendly, recyclable and renewable. Paper is also the material of choice for packages of various goods.In this work we have developed an ink-jet printable temperature sensor, a thermistor, consisting ofpoly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate)( PEDOT:PSS) on paper substrate. The starting material is acommercial PEDOT:PSS ink-jet ink (Orgacon IJ-1005, Agfa). This ink was then modified to increase the thermal sensitivityby addition of the co-solvents Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and Polyethylene glycol (PEG) in different quantities. DMSO hasbeen shown to increase the conductance by arranging the PEDOT into more conductive pathways and by removing PSS[1] and PEG to increase the carrier density and mobility [2].The sensors consisted of modified PEDOT:PSS lines printed on photo-paper substrate between contacts printed usingsilver nano-particle ink. The line widths were varied from one pixel, corresponding to one pass of one nozzle up-to 20pixels. The linewidths were then measured to be from 45 μm up-to 450 μm. The thickness of the sensor was also varied asone, two or three printed layers. The characterization as a temperature sensor was performed by using a setup consistingof a Peltier cooler and a heating element to step the temperature. As a reference a PT-100 element fixed to the surface ofthe cooler/heater was used.An increase in resistance from 30.5 MΩ to 85 MΩ, corresponding to a change of 2.8 times, were measured when thetemperature were changed from 22 °C to -12 °C as can be seen in the figure. This gives a ΔR/ΔT of 0.093.Such a printed sensor can be used for applications where a low cost, printable solution is needed, such as printed directlyon packages, for environmental monitoring and similar.[1] C.S. Pathak, J.P. Singh, R. Singh, Effect of dimethyl sulfoxide on the electrical properties of PEDOT:PSS/ n-Siheterojunction diodes, Current Applied Physics, 15, (2015), 528-534[2] Yow-Jon Lin, Wei-Shih Ni and Jhe-You Lee, Effect of incorporation of ethylene glycol into PEDOT:PSS on electronphonon coupling and conductivity, Journal of Applied Physics 117, (2015), 215501

  • 21.
    Niga, Petru
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of applied science and design.
    Örtegren, Jonas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of applied science and design.
    Alecrim, Viviane
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of applied science and design.
    Klaman, Marianne
    Innventia AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Blohm, Erik
    Innventia AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lofthus, Jon
    Innventia AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hybrid printing: paper media for combined flexographic and inkjet printing2012In: Conference proceedings International Paper Physics Conference, Stockholm: Innventia , 2012, p. 79-81Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Hybrid printing combining inkjet technology with flexography can be used to add customer specific information into the production of packaging and print. However, in order to improve print quality, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms governing print quality is required. In this work, inkjet printing using three aqueous inkjet inks was performed on top of flexographic printouts on four paper substrates. For comparative reasons, inkjet printouts were made on the four papers as well. The flexographic film contained tone values ranging from 0 to 100% ink coverage. Line width and print density of the inkjet printouts were evaluated. It was found that paper characteristics such as surface energy, porosity, absorption coefficient and surface roughness play an important role in defining the final print quality. These findings are further supported by micrograph images.

  • 22.
    Niskanen, Ilpo
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design. University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Forsberg, Viviane
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences. KTH.
    Zakrisson, Daniel
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Reza, Salim
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andres, Britta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Fedorov, Igor
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Suopajärvi, Terhi
    University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Liimatainen, Henrikki
    University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Thungström, Göran
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Determination of nanoparticle size using Rayleigh approximation and Mie theory2019In: Chemical Engineering Science, ISSN 0009-2509, E-ISSN 1873-4405, Vol. 201, no 29, p. 222-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Accurate determination of the size of nanoparticles has an important role in many different scientific and industrial purposes, such as in material, medical and environment sciences, colloidal chemistry and astrophysics. We describe an effective optical method to determine the size of nanoparticles by analysis of transmission and scattering of visible spectral range data from a designed UV-Vis multi-spectrophotometer. The size of the nanoparticles was calculated from the extinction cross section of the particles using Rayleigh approximation and Mie theory. We validated the method using polystyrene nanospheres, cellulose nanofibrils, and cellulose nanocrystals. A good agreement was achieved through graphical analysis between measured extinction cross section values and theoretical Rayleigh approximation and Mie theory predictions for the sizes of polystyrene nanospheres at wavelength range 450 - 750 nm. Provided that Rayleigh approximation's forward scattering (FS)/back scattering (BS) ratio was smaller than 1.3 and Mie theory's FS/BS ratio was smaller than 1.8. A good fit for the hydrodynamic diameter of nanocellulose was achieved using the Mie theory and Rayleigh approximation. However, due to the high aspect ratio of nanocellulose, the obtained results do not directly reflect the actual cross-sectional diameters of the nanocellulose. Overall, the method is a fast, relatively easy, and simple technique to determine the size of a particle by a spectrophotometer. Consequently, the method can be utilized for example in production and quality control purposes as well as for research and development applications.

  • 23.
    Zhang, Renyun
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Alecrim, Viviane
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andres, Britta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Forsberg, Sven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Mattias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Thermally reduced kaolin-graphene oxide nanocomposites for gas sensing2015In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, p. Art. no. 7676-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Highly sensitive graphene-based gas sensors can be made using large-area single layer graphene, but the cost of large-area pure graphene is high, making the simpler reduced graphene oxide (rGO) an attractive alternative. To use rGO for gas sensing, however, require a high active surface area and slightly different approach is needed. Here, we report on a simple method to produce kaolin-graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposites and an application of this nanocomposite as a gas sensor. The nanocomposite was made by binding the GO flakes to kaolin with the help of 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). The GO flakes in the nanocomposite were contacting neighboring GO flakes as observed by electron microscopy. After thermal annealing, the nanocomposite become conductive as showed by sheet resistance measurements. Based on the conductance changes of the nanocomposite films, electrical gas sensing devices were made for detecting NH3 and HNO3. These devices had a higher sensitivity than thermally annealed multilayer GO films. This kaolin-GO nanocomposite might be useful in applications that require a low-cost material with large conductive surface area including the demonstrated gas sensors.

  • 24.
    Zhang, Renyun
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Forsberg, Viviane
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Engholm, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Öhlund, Thomas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olsen, Martin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Örtegren, Jonas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Photoconductivity of acid exfoliated and flash-light-processed MoS2 films2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 3296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    MoS2 has been studied intensively during recent years as a semiconducting material in several fields, including optoelectronics, for applications such as solar cells and phototransistors. The photoresponse mechanisms of MoS2 have been discussed but are not fully understood, especially the phenomenon in which the photocurrent slowly increases. Here, we report on a study of the photoresponse flash-light-processed MoS2 films of different thicknesses and areas. The photoresponse of such films under different light intensities and bias voltages was measured, showing significant current changes with a quick response followed by a slow one upon exposure to pulsed light. Our in-depth study suggested that the slow response was due to the photothermal effect that heats the MoS2; this hypothesis was supported by the resistivity change at different temperatures. The results obtained from MoS2 films with various thicknesses indicated that the minority-carrier diffusion length was 1.36 mu m. This study explained the mechanism of the slow response of the MoS2 film and determined the effective thickness of MoS2 for a photoresponse to occur. The method used here for fabricating MoS2 films could be used for fabricating optoelectronic devices due to its simplicity.

1 - 24 of 24
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