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  • 1.
    Alecrim, Viviane
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Zhang, Renyun
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andres, Britta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Dahlström, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Norgren, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Andersson, Mattias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Exfoliated Layered Materials for Digital Fabrication2015In: NIP & Digital Fabrication Conference, 2015, Vol. 1, p. 192-194Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We introduced an exfoliation method of MoS2 in a 3% solution of sodium dodecyl surfactant at high concentration (i.e. 2 g/L). The bulk MoS2 was thinned by mechanical exfoliation between sand papers and the resulting powder was used to prepare dispersions by liquid exfoliation through probe sonication. The resulting dispersion consisted of very thin MoS2 nanosheets in surfactant solution with average lateral size around 126 nm. This may be interesting for applications in inkjet printed electronics.

  • 2.
    Andres, Britta
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Dahlström, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Blomquist, Nicklas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Norgren, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Cellulose binders for electric double-layer capacitor electrodes: The influence of cellulose quality on electrical properties2018In: Materials & design, ISSN 0264-1275, E-ISSN 1873-4197, Vol. 141, p. 342-349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose derivatives are widely used as binders and dispersing agents in different applications. Binders composed of cellulose are an environmentally friendly alternative to oil-based polymer binding agents. Previously, we reported the use of cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) as binders in electrodes for electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs). In addition to good mechanical stability, we demonstrated that CNFs enhanced the electrical performance of the electrodes. However, cellulose fibers can cover a broad range of length scales, and the quality requirements from an electrode perspective have not been thoroughly investigated. To evaluate the influence of fiber quality on electrode properties, we tested seven samples with different fiber dimensions that are based on the same kraft pulp. To capture the length scale from fibers to nanofibrils, we evaluated the performance of the untreated kraft pulp, refined fibers, microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) and CNFs. Electrodes with kraft pulp or refined fibers showed the lowest electrical resistivity. The specific capacitances of all EDLCs were surprisingly similar, but slightly lower for the EDLC with CNFs. The same electrode sample with CNFs also showed a slightly higher equivalent series resistance (ESR), compared to those of the other EDLCs. Graphite dispersions with MFC showed the best dispersion stability. 

  • 3.
    Andres, Britta
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Dahlström, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Engström, Ann-Christine
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Forsberg, Sven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Blomquist, Nicklas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Cellulose-based binder systems for electrochemical electrodes2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Andres, Britta
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Engström, Ann-Christine
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Blomquist, Nicklas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Forsberg, Sven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Dahlström, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Electrode Mass Balancing as an Inexpensive and Simple Method to Increase the Capacitance of Electric Double-Layer Capacitors2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 9, p. 1-12, article id e0163146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Symmetric electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) have equal masses of the same active material in both electrodes. However, having equal electrode masses may prevent the EDLC to have the largest possible specific capacitance if the sizes of the hydrated anions and cations in the electrolyte differ because the electrodes and the electrolyte may not be completely utilized. Here we demonstrate how this issue can be resolved by mass balancing. If the electrode masses are adjusted according to the size of the ions, one can easily increase an EDLC's specific capacitance. To that end, we performed galvanostatic cycling to measure the capacitances of symmetric EDLCs with different electrode mass ratios using four aqueous electrolytes-Na2SO4, H2SO4, NaOH, and KOH (all with a concentration of 1 M)-and compared these to the theoretical optimal electrode mass ratio that we calculated using the sizes of the hydrated ions. Both the theoretical and experimental values revealed lower-than-1 optimal electrode ratios for all electrolytes except KOH. The largest increase in capacitance was obtained for EDLCs with NaOH as electrolyte. Specifically, we demonstrate an increase of the specific capacitance by 8.6% by adjusting the electrode mass ratio from 1 to 0.86. Our findings demonstrate that electrode mass balancing is a simple and inexpensive method to increase the capacitance of EDLCs. Furthermore, our results imply that one can reduce the amount of unused material in EDLCs and thus decrease their weight, volume and cost.

  • 5.
    Andres, Britta
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Forsberg, Sven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Dahlström, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Blomquist, Nicklas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Enhanced electrical and mechanical properties of nanographite electrodes for supercapacitors by addition of nanofibrillated cellulose2014In: Physica status solidi. B, Basic research, ISSN 0370-1972, E-ISSN 1521-3951, Vol. 251, no 12, p. 2581-2586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Graphene and porous carbon materials are widely used as electrodes in supercapacitors. In order to form mechanically stable electrodes, binders can be added to the conducting electrode material. However, most bindersdegrade the electrical performance of the electrodes. Here we show that by using nanofibrillated cellulose(NFC) as binder the electrical properties, such as capacitance, were enhanced. The highest capacitance was measured at a NFC content of approximately 10% in ratio to the total amount of active material. NFC is a good ionconductor and improves the access of ions in the electrodes. Thus, electrodes made of a mixture of nanographite and NFC achieved larger capacitances in supercapacitors than electrodes with nanographite only. In addition to electrical properties, NFC enhanced the mechanical stability and wet strength of the electrodes significantly. Furthermore, NFC stabilized the aqueous nanographite dispersions, which improved the processability. Galvanostatic cycling was performed and an initial transient behaviour of the supercapacitors during the first cycles was observed. However, stabilized supercapacitors showed efficiencies of 98–100 %.

  • 6.
    Dahlström, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of applied science and design.
    Quantitative microscopy of coating uniformity2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Print quality demands for coated papers are steadily growing, and achieving coating uniformity is crucial for high image sharpness, colour fidelity, and print uniformity. Coating uniformity may be divided into two scales: coating thickness uniformity and coating microstructure uniformity, the latter of which includes pigment, pore and binder distributions within the coating layer. This thesis concerns the investigation of both types of coating uniformity by using an approach of quantitative microscopy.First, coating thickness uniformity was analysed by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of paper cross sections, and the relationships between local coating thickness variations and the variations of underlying base sheet structures were determined. Special attention was given to the effect of length scales on the coating thickness vs. base sheet structure relationships.The experimental results showed that coating thickness had a strong correlation with surface height (profile) of base sheet at a small length scale. However, at a large length scale, it was mass density of base sheet (formation) that had the strongest correlation with coating thickness. This result explains well the discrepancies found in the literature for the relationship between coating thickness variation and base sheet structure variations. The total variance of coating thickness, however, was dominated by the surface height variation in the small scale, which explained around 50% of the variation. Autocorrelation analyses were further performed for the same data set. The autocorrelation functions showed a close resemblance of the one for a random shot process with a correlation length in the order of fibre width. All these results suggest that coating thickness variations are the result of random deposition of particles with the correlation length determined by the base sheet surface textures, such as fibre width.In order to obtain fundamental understandings of the random deposition processes on a rough surface, such as in paper, a generic particle deposition model was developed, and systematic analyses were performed for the effects of particle size, coat weight (average number of particles), levelling, and system size on coating thickness variation. The results showed that coating thickness variation3grows with coat weight, but beyond a certain coat weight, it reaches a plateau value. A scaling analysis yielded a universal relationship between coating thickness variation and the above mentioned variables. The correlation length of coating thickness was found to be determined by average coat weight and the state of underlying surfaces. For a rough surface at relatively low coat weight, the correlation length was typically in the range of fibre width, as was also observed experimentally.Non-uniformities within the coating layer, such as porosity variations and binder distributions, are investigated by using a newly developed method: field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) in combination with argon ion beam milling technique. The combination of these two techniques produced extremely high quality images with very few artefacts, which are particularly suited for quantitative analyses of coating structures. A new evaluation method was also developed by using marker-controlled watershed segmentation (MCWS) of the secondary electron images (SEI).The high resolution imaging revealed that binder enrichment, a long disputed subject in the area, is present in a thin layer of a 500 nm thickness both at the coating surface and at the base sheet/coating interface. It was also found that the binders almost exclusively fill up the small pores, whereas the larger pores are mainly empty or depleted of binder.

  • 7.
    Dahlström, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Sample Preparation Using Argon Ion Beam Milling2013In: Argon: Production, Characteristics and Applications / [ed] Bogos Nubar Sismanoglu, Homero Santiago Maciel, Marija Radmilovic-Radjenovic, Rodrigo Savio Pessoa (Physics Department, Lab of Optics and Spectroscopy, Lab of Plasmas and Processes and Lab of Mechanics, Heath and Waves, Technological Institute of Aeronaut, Hauppauge, NY: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2013, p. 223-240Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Surface and cross section analysis can provide important information on material properties. It has, however, been difficult to characterise the internal structure at a micro scale using cross sections prepared with conventional methods, such as e.g. mechanical grinding and polishing, because these procedures can damage the surface and introduce artefacts. A few years ago, a new precision argon ion beam cross section polisher was shown to be a suitable sample preparation technique for microstructure characterisation. It produces high quality cross sections free from artefacts and distortions. This technique can be used for cross section preparation of a wide variety of materials including composites, metals, ceramics and polymers. Argon ion beam milling can also be used in combination with focused ion beam (FIB) as a final step to remove FIB-damaged layers before nano- and microstructure characterisation in high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM).

  • 8.
    Dahlström, Christina
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Allem, Rafik
    FPInnovations, Pointe Claire, PQ, Canada.
    Uesaka, Tetsu
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    New Method for Characterizing Paper Coating Structures Using Argon Ion Beam Milling and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy2011In: Journal of Microscopy, ISSN 0022-2720, E-ISSN 1365-2818, Vol. 241, no 2, p. 179-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have developed a new method for characterizing microstructures of paper coating using argon ion beam milling technique and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The combination of these two techniques produces extremely high-quality images with very few artefacts, which are particularly suited for quantitative analyses of coating structures. A new evaluation method has been developed by using marker-controlled watershed segmentation technique of the secondary electron images. The high-quality secondary electron images with well-defined pores makes it possible to use this semi-automatic segmentation method. One advantage of using secondary electron images instead of backscattered electron images is being able to avoid possible overestimation of the porosity because of the signal depth. A comparison was made between the new method and the conventional method using greyscale histogram thresholding of backscattered electron images. The results showed that the conventional method overestimated the pore area by 20% and detected around 5% more pores than the new method. As examples of the application of the new method, we have investigated the distributions of coating binders, and the relationship between local coating porosity and base sheet structures. The technique revealed, for the first time with direct evidence, the long-suspected coating non-uniformity, i.e. binder migration, and the correlation between coating porosity versus base sheet mass density, in a straightforward way.

  • 9.
    Dahlström, Christina
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Andres, Britta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Faria, Gregorio C
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, São Carlos Physics Institute, University of São Paulo.
    Engström, Ann-Christine
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Duong, Duc, T.
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University.
    Salleo, Alberto
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University.
    Structural Change of Cellulose Nanofibers in Supercapacitor Electrodes during Galvanostatic Cycling2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Graphene and other carbon-based materials are often used as electrodes in electrochemical double-layer supercapacitors (EDLCs), due to their ability to store electrical energy. Cellulose nanofibers (CNF) have been proven to be suitable as a dispersion agent and binder in graphite based electrodes for supercapacitor applications, especially due to their capability to improve the wet and dry strength of the electrode. At the same time the capacitance is maintained or even increased with addition of CNF. It is reasonable to believe that the addition of CNF manages to stabilize smaller graphite particles in the dispersion which results in larger internal surface area in the dry material.

     

    When the amount of CNF is around 20 wt%, (in ratio to the total mass of active material), both scanning electron microscopy and XPS analysis showed that the surface is almost completely covered with the nano-cellulose. Even with this isolating layer of cellulose it is interesting to note that the capacitance is as high as 90 F/g, compared to around 50 F/g for the lowest CNF amount of 5 wt%. However, by applying voltage pulses during the galvanostatic cycling procedure for capacitance measurements, an initial transient behavior is observed during the first cycles. Therefore the capacitance is calculated after 4000 charge and discharge curves, when curves are completely stabilized. We found that the electrode structure changes significantly during this capacitance measurement and already after a short pulse of 10 s and 0.3 V the structural change is noticeable. After cycling for 24 hours, a completely new structure emerges where large fiber-like structures are developed with diameters around 20-30 µm. The galvanostatic cycling procedure has created fiber-like cellulose structures around 1000 times larger than the initial size of the nano-cellulose.

     

    Structural properties of the electrode have often been related to the electronic properties in the supercapacitor. Our result shows that due to this change in the CNF structure, the electrode properties after galvanostatic cycling are indeed also of interest to study. This structural change might be critical to device performance and durability.    

  • 10.
    Dahlström, Christina
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Andres, Britta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Forsberg, Sven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Coating Uniformity and its Effect on Supercapacitor Capacitance2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Dahlström, Christina
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of applied science and design.
    Uesaka, Tetsu
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of applied science and design.
    Coating Microstructures: Binder Distributions2012In: 12th TAPPI Advanced Coating Fundamentals Symposium Proceedings, Co-located with the 16th International Coating Science and Technology Symposium, ISCST 2012, Tappi , 2012, p. 250-257Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

     Non-uniformities within the coating layer, such as porosity variations and binder distributions, are known to affect print uniformity and barrier properties. However, in the literature the results on coating microstructures are rather limited or sometimes conflicting.We obtained high quality images of coated paper cross sections using field emission scanning electron microscopy in combination with a new argon ion beam milling technique to directly observe and analyse the binder and pore distribution. This technique produces high quality images that allow microstructure characterisation of the coating layer.The binder distribution measurements showed that the binder is almost exclusively filling up the small pores, whereas the larger pores are mainly empty and depleted of binder.

  • 12.
    Dahlström, Christina
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of applied science and design.
    Uesaka, Tetsu
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of applied science and design.
    Microstructure Variations in Paper Coating: Direct Observations2012In: Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, ISSN 0888-5885, E-ISSN 1520-5045, Vol. 51, no 24, p. 8246-8252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-uniformities in the coating layer, such as porosity variations and binder distributions, are known to affect print uniformity and barrier properties. However, in the literature the results are rather scarce or sometimes conflicting.

    We acquired high quality images of coated paper cross sections using field emission scanning electron microscopy in combination with a new argon-ion-beam milling technique to directly observe and analyse the coating microstructures in relation to underlying base sheet structures.

    The results showed that coating porosity varied with mass density of the underlying base sheet for the relatively bulky clay/GCC coating, whereas for the more compact clay coating, the effect was small. Areas with more fibres in the base sheet were more compressed by calendering, resulting in a decreased coating porosity. A unique binder enriched layer of less than 500 nm thickness was found at the coating surface as well as at the coating/base sheet interface.

  • 13.
    Dahlström, Christina
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Uesaka, Tetsu
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    New Insights into Coating Uniformity and Base Sheet Structures2009In: Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, ISSN 0888-5885, E-ISSN 1520-5045, Vol. 48, no 23, p. 10472-10478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Base sheet structures, such as surface roughness and mass density distribution (formation), have been known to affect coating uniformity. However, the literature is not necessarily consistent in determining which structure controls coating uniformity. This study employed scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and image analysis, combined with autocorrelation and frequency analyses, to investigate the fundamental mechanisms of coating and to resolve some of the controversies in the literature regarding the base sheet effects. The results showed that coating thickness variation resembles a process of random deposition with leveling. At small length scales (in the size of fiber width), leveling causes a very strong dependence of coating thickness variations on the surface profile of the base sheet, whereas at larger length scales, coating thickness variation diminishes in its intensity by the same leveling effect, but still retains a significant correlation with base sheet structure, particularly formation. Frequency analyses clearly showed that the discrepancies in the results for the base sheet effects in the literature are due to the length scales used in the experiments, that is, the sampling area and the resolution of the measurements.

  • 14.
    Dahlström, Christina
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Uesaka, Tetsu
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Surface Evolution of Pigment CoatingManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

        We studied the surface evolution of coating by using a random deposition model of particles. In order to capture the real coating structure development, we included a volume exclusion effect to represent particle-particle interaction, and a levelling effect to represent surface tension effect. In this study we investigated three cases: (1) random deposition on a flat surface, (2) random deposition on a flat surface with levelling, and (3) random deposition on a rough surface with levelling.

    When plotting in logarithmic scale, the roughness initially increased linearly with average number of particles deposited for all three cases but reached saturation after a certain amount of deposited particles. The result resembles a ballistic deposition process where agglomerates are developed over the surface due to lateral growth. Even a flat, uniform surface creates roughness during random deposition of particles.

    Autocorrelation analysis showed that the correlation length continues to increase with the number of particles deposited. The aggregated structures were easily seen in the autocorrelation function.

    Experimental and simulated data on the rough surface were compared and they were in agreement, confirming that the coating process is essentially a random process with some local correlation in the length scale of a typical fibre width. 

  • 15.
    Dahlström, Christina
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Uesaka, Tetsu
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Norgren, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Base Sheet Structures that Control Coating Uniformity: Effects of Length Scale2008In: TAPPI Advanced Coating Fundamentals Symposium Proceedings, TAPPI Press, 2008, p. 124-133Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Characterization of the base sheet properties and coating layer properties was performed by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of paper cross-sections and image analysis. Frequency analysis was used to study how the base sheet properties affect coating thickness uniformity at different length scales. Samples analysed were Lightweight Coated (LWC) base sheets blade-coated on only one side with coat weights of 12 and 22 g/m2. A number of images were taken in sequence giving a total length of more than 6 mm. The results showed that the surface height variations of the base sheet control coating uniformity in the entire examined length scale, but with different mechanisms. At short wavelengths the coating mechanism was “level coating” where the coating suspension fills small pores (“levels”), whereas at longer wavelengths the coating suspension follows the surface profile and “contour coating” becomes more prevalent. In other words, the level- and contour-coatings represent the coating mechanisms in different length scales. Surface height variations can be explained by base sheet thickness only at short wavelengths, but at all other wavelengths the surface height variations were very much independent of the base sheet structure properties measured.

  • 16.
    Eivazihollagh, Alireza
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Bäckström, Joakim
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Dahlström, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Carlsson, Fredrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Ibrahem, Ismail
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Lindman, Björn
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Edlund, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Norgren, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    One-pot synthesis of cellulose-templated copper nanoparticles with antibacterial properties2017In: Materials letters (General ed.), ISSN 0167-577X, E-ISSN 1873-4979, Vol. 187, p. 170-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report a facile in situ synthesis of spherical copper nanoparticles (NPs) templated by a gelled cellulose II matrix under alkaline aqueous reaction conditions. In under 20 min, the hybrid material could be obtained in a one-pot reaction. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) revealed that the polycrystalline NPs of 200–500 nm were well distributed in the regenerated cellulose matrix. The average Cu crystallite size was of the order of 20 nm, as estimated from both X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FE-SEM. XRD data also indicated that the composite contained up to approximately 20% Cu2O. In suspensions containing the hybrid material, growth of Escerichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus strains was inhibited by 80% and 95%, respectively, after 72 h. The synthesis procedure offers a general approach to designing various low-cost hybrid materials of almost any shape, and the concept could be extended to utilization areas such as catalysis, functional textiles, and food packaging as well as to electronic applications.

  • 17.
    Eivazihollagh, Alireza
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering. FSCN.
    Norgren, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering. FSCN.
    Dahlström, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering. FSCN.
    Edlund, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering. FSCN.
    Controlled Synthesis of Cu and Cu2O NPs and Incorporation of Octahedral Cu2O NPs in Cellulose II Films2018In: Nanomaterials, ISSN 2079-4991, Vol. 8, no 4, article id 238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, Cu and Cu2O nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized through chemical reduction of soluble copper-chelating ligand complexes using formaldehyde as a reducing agent. The influence of various chelating ligands, such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), and a surface-active derivative of DTPA (C12-DTPA), as well as surfactants (i.e., hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride (DoTAC), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and dimethyldodecylamine-N-oxide (DDAO)), on morphology and the composition of produced NPs was investigated. In the absence of surfactants, spherical copper particles with polycrystalline structure could be obtained. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed that, in the presence of EDTA, the synthesized NPs are mainly composed of Cu with a crystallite size on the order of 35 nm, while with DTPA and C12-DTPA, Cu2O is also present in the NPs as a minority phase. The addition of ionic surfactants to the copper–EDTA complex solution before reduction resulted in smaller spherical particles, mainly composed of Cu. However, when DDAO was added, pure Cu2O nano-octahedrons were formed, as verified by high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR-SEM) and XRD. Furthermore, a hybrid material could be successfully prepared by mixing the octahedral Cu2O NPs with cellulose dissolved in a LiOH/urea solvent system, followed by spin-coating on silica wafers. It is expected that this simple and scalable route to prepare hybrid materials could be applied to a variety of possible applications.

  • 18.
    Faria, Gregorio Couto
    et al.
    Stanford University, Instituto de Física de São Carlos (IFSC).
    Duong, Duc Trong
    Stanford University.
    Dahlström, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Rivnay, Jonathan
    École Nationale Supérieure des Mines de Saint Étienne.
    Malliaras, George
    École Nationale Supérieure des Mines de Saint Étienne.
    Owens, Roisin
    École Nationale Supérieure des Mines de Saint Étienne.
    Salleo, Alberto
    Stanford University.
    Modeling Transient Drain Current Response in Biofunctionalized Organic Electrochemical Transistors2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Forsberg, Sven
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andres, Britta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Blomquist, Nicklas
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Dahlström, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Engström, Ann-Christine
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Paper-based supercapacitors2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Forsberg, Sven
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Kumar, Vinay
    Åbo Akademi University.
    Engström, Ann-Christine
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Maristiina, Nurmi
    Åbo Akademi University.
    Dahlström, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Martti, Toivakka
    Åbo Akademi University.
    Effect of calendering and coating formulations on conductivity in paper-based electrodes2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Forsberg, Viviane
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Zhang, Renyun
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Bäckström, Joakim
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Dahlström, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Norgren, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Andres, Britta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Liquid Exfoliation of Layered Materials in Water for Inkjet Printing2016In: Printing for Fabrication 2016: Materials, Applications, and Processes, USA: Curran Associates, Inc., 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    MoS2 is a layered material which is abundant and non-toxic and has been increasingly studied during the last few years as a semiconducting alternative to graphene. While most studies have been performed on single MoS2 nanosheets, for example to demonstrate high-performance electronic transistors, more work is needed to explore the use of MoS2 in printed electronics. The importance of using MoS2 as a printed electronic material could be understood by considering the several orders higher electron mobility in MoS2, even in several nanometer thick layers, compared to the organic and other materials used today. In the few studies performed so far on printing MoS2, the developed dispersions used mainly organic solvents that might be detrimental for the environment. Here, we show an environmentally friendly liquid-based exfoliation method in water where the solution was stabilized by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant. The dispersions consisted of very thin MoS2 nanosheets with average lateral size of about 150 nm, surface tension of 28 mN m-1 and a shelf life of a year. Although both the concentration and viscosity was less than optimal, we were able to inkjet print the MoS2 solution on paper and on PET films, using multiple printing passes. By tuning the concentration/viscosity, this approach might lead to an environmentally friendly MoS2 ink suitable for printed electronics.

  • 22.
    Forsberg, Viviane
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Zhang, Renyun
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Bäckström, Joakim
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Dahlström, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Norgren, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Andres, Britta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Liquid Exfoliation of Layered Materials in Water for Inkjet Printing2016In: Journal of Imaging Science and Technology, ISSN 1062-3701, E-ISSN 1943-3522, Vol. 60, no 4, p. 1-7, article id 040405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    MoS2 is a layered material which is abundant and non-toxic and has been increasingly studied during the last few years as a semiconducting alternative to graphene. While most studies have been performed on single MoS2 nanosheets, for example to demonstrate high-performance electronic transistors, more work is needed to explore the use of MoS2 in printed electronics. The importance of using MoS2 as a printed electronic material could be understood by considering the several orders higher electron mobility in MoS2, even in several nanometer thick layers, compared to the organic and other materials used today. In the few studies performed so far on printing MoS2, the developed dispersions used mainly organic solvents that might be detrimental for the environment. Here, we show an environmentally friendly liquid-based exfoliation method in water where the solution was stabilized by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant. The dispersions consisted of very thin MoS2 nanosheets with average lateral size of about 150 nm, surface tension of 28 mN m(-1), and a shelf life of a year. Although both the concentration and viscosity was less than optimal, we were able to inkjet print the MoS2 solution on paper and on PET films, using multiple printing passes. By tuning the concentration/viscosity, this approach might lead to an environmentally friendly MoS2 ink suitable for printed electronics.

  • 23.
    Forsberg, Viviane
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Zhang, Renyun
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Joakim, Bäckström
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Dahlström, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Andres, Britta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Norgren, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Andersson, Mattias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Hummelgård, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Exfoliated MoS2 in Water without Additives2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 4, article id 0154522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many solution processing methods of exfoliation of layered materials have been studied during the last few years; most of them are based on organic solvents or rely on surfactants andother funtionalization agents. Pure water should be an ideal solvent, however, it is generallybelieved, based on solubility theories that stable dispersions of water could not be achievedand systematic studies are lacking. Here we describe the use of water as a solvent and thestabilization process involved therein. We introduce an exfoliation method of molybdenumdisulfide (MoS2) in pure water at high concentration (i.e., 0.14±0.01 g L−1). This was achieved by thinning the bulk MoS2by mechanical exfoliation between sand papers and dis-persing it by liquid exfoliation through probe sonication in water. We observed thin MoS2nanosheets in water characterized by TEM, AFM and SEM images. The dimensions of thenanosheets were around 200 nm, the same range obtained in organic solvents. Electropho-retic mobility measurements indicated that electrical charges may be responsible for the sta-bilization of the dispersions. A probability decay equation was proposed to compare thestability of these dispersions with the ones reported in the literature. Water can be used as asolvent to disperse nanosheets and although the stability of the dispersions may not be ashigh as in organic solvents, the present method could be employed for a number of applications where the dispersions can be produced on site and organic solvents are not desirable.

  • 24.
    Henshaw Osong, Sinke
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Dahlström, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Forsberg, Sven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Andres, Britta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Engstrand, Per
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Norgren, Sven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Olin, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Engström, Ann-Christine
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Development of CTMP-based nanofibrillated Cellulose /nanographite composites for paper applications2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Kumar, V.
    et al.
    Åbo Akad Univ, Turku, Finland.
    Forsberg, S.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Engström, A.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Nurmi, M.
    Åbo Akad Univ, Turku, Finland.
    Dahlström, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Toivakka, Martti
    Åbo Akad Univ, Turku, Finland.
    Conductive carbon-nanocellulose coatings on paper2017In: TAPPI Journal, ISSN 0734-1415, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 310-311Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Kumar, V.
    et al.
    Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland.
    Forsberg, Sven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Engström, Ann-Christine
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Nurmi, M.
    Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland.
    Dahlström, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Toivakka, M.
    Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland.
    Conductive carbon-nanocellulose coatings on paper2017In: Paper Conference and Trade Show, PaperCon 2017: Renew, Rethink, Redefine the Future, TAPPI Press , 2017, p. 26-35Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Kumar, Vinay
    et al.
    Åbo Akad Univ, Turku, Finland.
    Forsberg, Sven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Engström, Ann-Christine
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Nurmi, Maristiina
    Åbo Akad Univ, Turku, Finland.
    Andres, Britta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Dahlström, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Toivakka, Martti
    Åbo Akad Univ, Turku, Finland.
    Conductive nanographite-nanocellulose coatings on paper2017In: Flexible And Printed Electronics, ISSN 2058-8585, Vol. 2, no 3, article id aa728eArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Paper products with active and functional coatings have attracted interest in recent years to counter the stagnating demand for traditional graphic paper grades. Conductive coatings have potential uses in various energy generation and storage applications, e.g. in batteries, supercapacitors, and photovoltaics. The current work aims to demonstrate large-scale production of flexible low-cost nanographite coatings on paper-based substrate. The large aspect ratio of graphene present in the suspension limits solids content to very low values, which makes it challenging to create thick coating layers required for high conductivity. The use of nanocellulose binder together with a custom-built slot-coating device enables roll-to-roll coating of thick conductive coatings on paper. The rheological and water-retention properties of nanographite-nanocellulose suspensions are reported. The influence of coat weight, carbon black addition, and calendering on coating structure and the resulting conductivity of the coatings is investigated. Impact of humidity and bending/creasing of coated samples on their electrical performance is explored as well. The lowest surface resistances obtained were in the range 1-2 Ohm/square, for 15 g m(-2) coat weight. Increasing the coat weight and calendering nip load resulted in higher conductivity of coatings. Carbon black addition deteriorated the conductivity somewhat, probably due to increased porosity of coatings. Moisture and creasing did not affect significantly the conductivity of high coat weight and calendered samples. The results reported are very encouraging for future research on further improving the electrical performance of such carbon coatings.

  • 28.
    Osong, Sinke Henshaw
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Dahlström, Christina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Forsberg, Sven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences. Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Andres, Britta
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Engstrand, Per
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Norgren, Sven
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Engström, Ann-Christine
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Nanofibrillated cellulose/nanographite composite films2016In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 2487-2500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Though research into nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) has recently increased, few studies have considered co-utilising NFC and nanographite(NG) in composite films, and, it has, however been a challenge to use high-yield pulp fibres (mechanical pulps) to produce this nanofibrillar material. It is worth noting that there is a significant difference between chemical pulp fibres and high-yield pulp fibres, as the former is composed mainly of cellulose and has a yield of approximately 50 % while the latter is consist of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, and has a yield of approximately 90 %. NFC was produced by combining TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethypiperidine-1-oxyl)-mediated oxidation with the mechanical shearing of chemi-thermomechanical pulp (CTMP) and sulphite pulp (SP); the NG was produced by mechanically exfoliating graphite. The different NaClO dosages in the TEMPO system differently oxidised the fibres, altering their fibrillation efficiency. NFC-NG films were produced by casting in a Petri dish. We examine the effect of NG on the sheet-resistance and mechanical properties of NFC films. Addition of 10 wt% NG to 90 wt% NFC of sample CC2 (5 mmol NaClO CTMP-NFC homogenised for 60 min) improved the sheet resistance, i.e. from that of an insulating pure NFC film to 180 Omega/sq. Further addition of 20 (CC3) and 25 wt% (CC4) of NG to 80 and 75 wt% respectively, lowered the sheet resistance to 17 and 9 Omega/sq, respectively. For the mechanical properties, we found that adding 10 wt% NG to 90 wt% NFC of sample HH2(5 mmol NaClO SP-NFC homogenised for 60 min) improved the tensile index by 28 %, tensile stiffness index by 20 %, and peak load by 28 %. The film's surface morphology was visualised using scanning electron microscopy, revealing the fibrillated structure of NFC and NG. This methodology yields NFC-NG films that are mechanically stable, bendable, and flexible.

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