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  • 1.
    Bengtsson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet.
    Söderholm, Anders
    Umeå universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet.
    Bridging Distances: Organizing Boundry-spanning Technology Development Projects2002In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 263-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technology development is often a boundary-spanning activity where insights and discoveries from different organizations or organizational units are merged into new products or new technical solutions. In some cases, projects of this kind are organized within large multinational firms. In other cases, technology development projects are organized within networks through co-operation between independent companies possessing unique resources that can be utilized as parts of the project. In this paper, we discuss and analyse how distances are bridged in technology development projects. We focus on: (1) the relationship between implicit and explicit knowledge; and (2) different distances inherent in the development effort. Two different bridging processes are proposed as means to overcome distances: a separating-integrating process; and a linking-formalizing process. It is argued that a development project typically runs through either one of these two processes.

  • 2.
    Bengtsson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet.
    Söderholm, Anders
    Umeå universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet.
    Müllern, Tomas
    Wåhlin, Nils
    Umeå universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet.
    A Grammar of Organizing2007Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Biedenbach, Thomas
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet.
    Söderholm, Anders
    Umeå universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet.
    The Challenge of Organizing Change in Hypercompetitive Industries: A Literature Review2008In: Journal of Change Management, ISSN 1469-7017, E-ISSN 1479-1811, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 123-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hypercompetitive, that is, dynamic and unpredictable environments require flexible, innovative and creative organizations, which can easily adapt quickly to the changing rules of the competitive arena. Organizations, therefore, continuously need to change. The management of organizational change in such a merciless environment is together key and restraint. This paper reviews literature covering organizational change in hypercompetitive environments with a focus on projects as the vehicle to create the necessary flexibility. The challenge is thus to combine the need for long-term sustainability with continuous flexibility in terms of how organizational and technological change efforts are designed and carried out. Organizations are well advised to develop a high degree of dynamic capabilities, which are the core of meeting the tensions of the capability and structural challenge. The authors suggest that organizational aspects and capabilities have to go hand in hand as enabler and at the same time facilitator for a successful emergent change process in hypercompetitive industries.

  • 4.
    Blomquist, Tomas
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Hällgren, Markus
    Umeå universitet.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    Umeå universitet.
    Söderholm, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Project-as-Practice: In Search of Project Management Research That Matters2010In: Project Management Journal, ISSN 8756-9728, E-ISSN 1938-9507, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 5-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on projects is not only an immaturefield of research, but it is also insubstantial whenit comes to understanding what occurs in projects.This article contributes to making projectmanagement research matter to the academic aswell as to the practitioner by developing a projectas-practice approach, in alignment with theongoing debate in social science research.The article outlines a framework and argues thatthere are two major challenges to the researcherand also suggests how these challenges can bemet. Underlying notions of the practice approachare outlined to ensure a development of theproject-as-practice approach that makes projectmanagement research matter!

  • 5. Dobers, Peter
    et al.
    Söderholm, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Translation and inscription in development projects: Understanding environmental and health care-related organizational change2009In: Journal of Organizational Change Management, ISSN 0953-4814, E-ISSN 1758-7816, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 480-493Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to argue that the interface between projects is of particular interest when organizing development projects. It offers a theoretical discussion of translation and inscription phases, not only because they are important to the understanding of mobilizing action in development projects, but also because they are crucial in a chain of sequential projects that are organized as responses to new situations.

     

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper uses illustrations of development projects in public management in Sweden to discuss a fundamental organizing problem of projects: how project delimitation and formation take place.

     

    Findings – The paper has focused on organizational change and development projects regarding environmental and health care organization renewal projects. It has analyzed how such projects are organized and linked to context. Development problems and their solutions cannot be divided into a functional structure since they overlap and demand attention by a multitude of perspectives during translation.

     

    Research limitations/implications – It is theoretically interesting to highlight certain slices of the organizational reality in projects. The paper has chosen a project perspective and focus at the beginning and end of projects. In theoretical terms, it has chosen to call these phases translation and inscription.

     

    Practical implications – Projects are different compared with permanent organizations due to the existence of beginnings and endings. On the one hand, permanent organizations are normally “going concerns” where the start is back in history and the end is clouded in a distant future. On the other hand, in a project, translation and inscription phases are unavoidable as they are triggered by the specific conditions underlying beginnings and endings.

     

    Originality/value – Projects with clear boundary-overlapping character cannot be judged with concepts stemming from the methods of construction project management. In contrary, the paper argues that there are two other concepts that can better explain the special organizing problems invoked by the cases cited here: translation and inscription.

     

     

  • 6. Ekstedt, Eskil
    et al.
    Lundin, Rolf A
    Högskolan i Jönköping, IHH, EMM (Entrepreneurskap, Marknadsföring, Management).
    Söderholm, Anders
    Wirdenius, Hans
    Neo-Industrial Organizing: renewal by action and knowledge formation in a project-intensive economy1999Book (Other academic)
  • 7. Geraldi, Joana G
    et al.
    Turner, J Rodney
    Maylor, Harvey
    Söderholm, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Innovation in project management: Voices of researchers2008In: International Journal of Project Management, ISSN 0263-7863, E-ISSN 1873-4634, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 586-589Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports and reflects on the discussions about the nature of the discipline of project management that took place during the 8th conference of the International Research Network of Organizing by Projects (IRNOP VIII), held in Brighton in September 2007. The discussions started with the provocative motion “This house believes that we no longer need the discipline of project management”. The arguments are organised in the following areas: the use of the traditional body of knowledge by practitioners and by academics; the use of project management as a knowledge field by practitioners and by academics. The discussions indicate that project management research is in a fruitful moment of revolution of paradigms. We wish that the new paradigm accepts the plurality of research in projects and we need discussions supporting and also refusing the ‘motion’, and by this means, proposing answers, rather than the answer, to the future of ‘the project management discipline’.

  • 8.
    Henfridsson, Ola
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Informatik.
    Söderholm, Anders
    Umeå universitet.
    Barriers to learning: on organizational defenses and vicious circles in technological adaptation2000In: Accounting, Management and Information Technologies, ISSN 0959-8022, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 33-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On the basis of an interpretive case study, the authors explore the learning implications of introducing First Class in a social services department. The investigated case illustrates how learning efforts easily result in ''vicious circles''; the more learning is sought after, the more solid are the barriers to learning. In this case, the existence of certain organizational virtues - the learning organization and the notion of the professional social worker - were observed to have negative learning implications. Paradoxically, at the espoused level, these two virtues can be understood as healthy signs, although their existence as only virtues makes them basically opposed to learning. The results of this study contribute to existing theory about discontinuity in technological adaptation.

  • 9.
    Hällgren, M
    et al.
    Umeå School of Business, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Jacobsson, M
    Umeå School of Business, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Söderholm, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Embracing the drifting environment: The legacy and impact of a Scandinavian project literature classic2012In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 695-713-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to provide an overview and analysis of the legacy of Christensen and Kreiner's (1991) literally classic Projektledning: att leda och lära i en ofullständig värld (Project Management: to manage and learn in an incomplete world). Design/methodology/approachThe paper is based on a three-step theoretical analysis deduced from the mentioned classic. The first step provides an overview of the content where the core ideas of the book are derived. This is followed by an analysis of the legacy and impact on theory, empirical approaches, and education. Finally, three main takeaways from the book are discussed. FindingsIn tracking the legacy, the paper analyses, discusses, and illustrates how the Scandinavian approach to projects has evolved. It pinpoints the two core insights of the book; the importance of understanding the impact of the institutional environment on operations, and embracing uncertainty as a natural part of everyday organizational reality. Based on these insights it is shown how the book has expanded the theoretical contributions towards a focus on temporary organisations and everyday practice, how it has helped to make situated empirical research matter, and how it has influenced education to deal with real-life project challenges. Research limitations/implicationsThis paper investigates a book available only in the Scandinavian language and thus only available for a Scandinavian research community. As such the review is written from a Scandinavian perspective, with the limitations in terms of objectivity to the book that follow from that. Practical implicationsThe main lessons discussed in relation to the heritage from the book are: an increased focus on the details of organizing, situated multi-level case-studies, and situation-sensitive teaching methodologies. The paper argues that an increased understanding of projects should start with a detailed multi-level analysis of temporary organizing to provide a sound foundation on which to base future research and teaching. Originality/valueThe paper provides an understanding of the origins and diffusion of underpinning ideas of the Scandinavian approach to project management.

  • 10.
    Hällgren, M
    et al.
    Umeå School of Business and Economics, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Nilsson, A
    Umeå School of Business and Economics, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Blomquist, T
    Umeå School of Business and Economics, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Söderholm, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Relevance lost! A critical review of project management standardisation2012In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 457-485Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to critically analyze the consequences of the diffusion of generic project management knowledge. Design/methodology/approachThis paper is conceptual in its nature, using short examples of four different areas (education, research, certification and practice) to show the diffusion of project management knowledge throughout these areas. FindingsIn this paper the authors argue that relevance may be lost at two levels. The first loss occurs when the practice of project management is transferred, through generalisation and standardisation, into what is generally known as “Best Practice”. The second occurs when “Best Practice” is transferred back to where it is applied (education, research, certification and practice). Research limitations/implicationsThe risk of losing relevance has consequences for what one bases one's assumptions of the nature of projects upon. If the assumptions are based on standardized knowledge, without critically assessing its correctness, the likelihood of producing less relevant research is higher. Practical implicationsWith the risk of losing relevance the authors argue that anyone involved in the areas of education, research, certification and practice needs to be cautious of how they perceive and work with the standards. There is a risk that the knowledge becomes even less relevant and students and practitioners are therefore less prepared for reality. Originality/valueThis paper is part of the literature critiquing the standardization of project management knowledge but it is distinct in terms of how the diffusion processes are perceived and utilized in a project setting.

  • 11.
    Hällgren, M
    et al.
    Umeå School of Business, Sweden.
    Söderholm, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Projects-as-Practice: New Approach, New Insights2011In: The Oxford Handbook of Project Management, Oxford University Press, 2011Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article mainly focuses on projects-as-practice based in the social sciences, and it suggests that the situated practice side of a social phenomenon is also important as a basis of study for understanding what is done. While the study is empirical, it focuses on the actions and actors involved in building or organizing environments, rather than simply looking at aggregated social processes or structures. With this approach, projects are seen as the sum of the actions of the people involved, which emphasizes both how people involved in projects act and how their typical workdays are structured. This may shed light on areas such as the importance of project management practice for strategic organizational change or the improvisation that is necessary for project execution.

  • 12.
    Hällgren, Markus
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet.
    Blomquist,, Tomas
    Umeå universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    Umeå universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet.
    Söderholm, Anders
    Umeå universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet.
    Project management practice: making project management research matter2006In: Irnop, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Project theory is not only an immature field of research, it is insubstantial when it comes to understanding what is really going on in projects. This paper contributes to making project research matter to the academic as well as the practitioner through the theoretical development of a project-as-practice approach, aligned with an ongoing debate in social science research. We outline the framework of project-as-practice and argue that there are two major challenges to the researcher: the relevance challenge and the pattern challenge. We suggest how these challenges can be met and give some examples of earlier studies that have done so. The practice approach is not a substitute to present theorizing but rather a complement that brings substance. Finally, underlying notions of the practice approach are outlined in order to have a fruitful future development of a project-as-practice approach that makes project theory matter!

  • 13.
    Hällgren, Markus H
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Söderholm, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Orchestrating deviations in global projects: Projects-as-Practice observations2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 352-367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary projects in a global environment are challenging to manage on a daily basis because of the need for situation-specific attention, on one hand, and the desire for efficiency and standardisation on the other. On the basis of loosely coupled systems theory, this paper investigates how a project team responds to departures from the project plan, de-couples these deviations from other activities in the project, treats the deviations and re-couples them. Through participant observations, interviews, as well as vocabulary used by project managers, the paper identifies two general sequences of de-coupling and re-coupling in responding to deviations. In "good enough" practice flexibility initially dominates the sequence, postponing stabilization of the situation until later when the appropriateness of the previous actions is considered. "Carefully assessed" practice on the other hand is initially dominated by creating a stable situation, and secondly flexibility is required in the search for the solution. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 14.
    Hällgren, Markus
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet.
    Söderholm, Anders
    Umeå universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet.
    Moral? I don't care, I just run a project!2009In: Feelings and business: Essays in honor of Claes Gustafsson, Stockholm: Santérus Academic Press Sweden, 2009, p. 129-149Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Jacobsson, M
    et al.
    Umeå School of Business, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Söderholm, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Breaking out of the straitjacket of project research: In search of contribution2011In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 378-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how a different and partly new strategy is needed in order to make research on projects relevant and interesting to a wider scientific community, including organisation and management theory. Design/methodology/approach – The aim is accomplished through a mystery-focused process that identifies what is not explained and continuously confronts empirical data with theoretical explanations in an interactive manner. Findings – Based on a phenomenology-stimulated meta-analysis of the field of project research, the paper outlines an alternative view of the field of project research and four streams of research, each of which is represented by its own scope, focus, audience and “taken-for-granted” assumptions. The streams are: in search of best practice, in search of legitimacy, in search of inspiration and in search of contribution. Research limitations/implications – The paper suggests that, in order to make an true impact on management and social science theories in general, projects must be redefined as objects of study rather than the raison d'être. The inherent paradox, and the conclusion of the paper is that, in order to become more relevant for a broader research community, projects must be reduced to an empirical illustration, a case among others. Originality/value – The paper provides a meta-analysis of the project management research field and offers new insights into challenges that need to be addressed in order to make project management research relevant for a wider management research community.

  • 16.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Umea Sch Business & Econ, Management Sect, Umea, Sweden..
    Lundin, Rolf A.
    Jonkoping Univ, Jonkoping Int Business Sch, Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Söderholm, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Business, Economics and Law.
    Researching Projects and Theorizing Families of Temporary Organizations2015In: Project Management Journal, ISSN 8756-9728, E-ISSN 1938-9507, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 9-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following contemporary development in which most temporary, focused, and organized endeavors can be regarded as a project and studied as a temporary organization, here we ask: How can these phenomena be defined without hindering pluralism in understanding, development, and theorizing? Based on the notions of family resemblance-the idea that it is not a specific trait, but a variety of traits that are shared by some, but not all, members of a family-we propose a new dynamic framework we believe is useful in advancing the studies of projects and temporary organizations toward more opportunities for rigorous theorizing.

  • 17.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Umeå.
    Lundin, Rolf A.
    Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping University, Jönköping.
    Söderholm, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Business, Economics and Law.
    Towards a multi-perspective research program on projects and temporary organizations: Analyzing the Scandinavian turn and the rethinking effort2016In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 752-766Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze important parts of the contemporary development of project research and to outline plausible and desirable directions for the future. Design/methodology/approach: This is accomplished through a review of the “Scandinavian School of Project Management” and “Rethinking Project Management,” which is complemented with a set of questions distributed to 27 active researchers within the project research field from around the world. Findings: Through the analysis the authors show how the two streams have more similarities than differences, despite the fact that they have been initiated in very different contexty 8ts and ways. The authors could also conclude that the “Scandinavian School” appears stronger on the international scene than in the Nordic countries, and that general perception of what the “school” stands for has changed and been blurred with time. Based on the analysis the authors also proposed the need for a broad, more coherent research effort in terms of a multi-perspective research program on projects and temporary organizations. The essence of this would be: an action research profile to improve practice and foresee the future; a combined research focus on institutional change and project practice to ensure both theoretical and empirical progress; and a strong global perspective to further enrich both theory and practice. Research limitations/implications: This research has obvious limitations in terms of empirical scope and response selection. The questionnaire results should therefore be interpreted with care. Originality/value: The value of this research lies in its reflective nature and the proposed trajectory of the project research domain.

  • 18.
    Lundin, R A
    et al.
    ESOL-MMTC, Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Söderholm, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Business, Economics and Law.
    Temporary organizations and end states: A theory is a child of its time and in need of reconsideration and reconstruction2013In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 587-594Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to respond to the research note on the article “A theory on temporary organizations” by reminding readers about the lack of timelessness in the social sciences and alluding to some alternative theory formulations. Design/methodology/approachBy describing/analyzing the context within which “A theory” was developed, the notion that any theory is a child of its time is explicated. Thus, an understanding for the need for reconsideration and reconstruction in social science theory is created. FindingsA necessary step in the work is to come up with ideas as to how crucial elements get transformed and is related to social development. The argument is that when it comes to the use of the word project is under change which creates a tension as to the appropriate realm for a theory of temporary organizations. A theory building on the notion of end state appears to be useful. Practical implicationsA theory incorporating the notion of end state opens up for new ideas on how to manage projects. The traditional project management guidelines might inhibit good solutions to focused behavior. An end state approach is more open for changes in the environment and in ambitions. Originality/valueThe theme opens up for less rigid approaches in relation to traditional project management. The crucial role that planning beforehand is considered to have will be transformed to other mechanisms, triggering planning and rethink.

  • 19.
    Lundin, Rolf A.
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, IHH, Media Management and Transformation Centre.
    Söderholm, Anders
    Ledning för förnyelse i landsting: Strategiska projekt i komplexa organisationer1997Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Sahlin-Andersson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Företagsekonomiska institutionen.
    Söderholm, Anders
    Umeå School of Business and Economics.
    Beyond project management: New Perspectives on the temporary - permanent dilemma2002Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Sahlin-Andersson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Företagsekonomiska institutionen.
    Söderholm, Anders
    The Scandinavian School of Perspectives2002In: Beyond project management. New perspectives on the temporary - permanent dilemma, Malmö: Liber, 2002, p. 241-260Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Sahlin-Andersson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Företagsekonomiska institutionen.
    Söderholm, Anders
    Visionen om framtidens Södertörn: organisering av ett regionalt utvecklingsprojekt1987Report (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Söderholm, Anders
    Umeå universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet.
    Project management of unexpected events2007In: International Journal of Project Management, ISSN 0263-7863, E-ISSN 1873-4634, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 80-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unexpected events and environmental impact not planned for are common during project implementation. This article explores how unexpected events are dealt with in projects using qualitative case study data from four different cases. Results show four different approaches to deal with unexpected events: innovative action, applying detachment strategies, setting up intensive meeting schedules and negotiating project conditions are common approaches to deal with the unexpected events. The discussion shed new light on one common situations during project execution – i.e. dealing with unexpected events – that is not normally included in the best practice models of project management.

  • 24.
    Söderholm, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet.
    Engwall, Mats
    Funktionschefer i projektorganiserade företag2008In: Projektliv: Villkor för uthållig projektverksamhet, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2008, p. 217-230Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Söderholm, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet.
    Gemünden, Hans Georg
    Winch, Graham M
    Projects and programmes: Strategies for creating value in the face of uncertainty: Papers presented at EURAM 20072008In: International Journal of Project Management, ISSN 0263-7863, E-ISSN 1873-4634, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 1-3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Söderholm, Anders
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Remington, Kaye
    University of Technology, Sydney.
    Time: one factor influencing the project managementof change2010In: International Journal of Project Organisation and Management, ISSN 1740-2891, E-ISSN 1740-2905, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 221-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using the concept of ‘time’ as a lens, this paper explores anorganisational change project in order to compare different world views thatmight affect project delivery. Observations which have time as a centralelement in their construction are reported from a case study involving actionresearch. The paper explores some apparent dissonances observed around thesocial experience of time: future and past orientation; organisational andprofessional and personal constructs; ‘clock time’ or chronos, in comparisonwith the qualitative time concept, kairos. Recommendations are made withrespect to time for management of change as a project.

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