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  • 1.
    Dorell, Åsa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Örnsköldsvik.
    Bäckström, Britt
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Ericsson, Marie
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Johansson, Maria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Östlund, Ulrika
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Sundin, Karin
    Umeå University, Örnsköldsvik.
    Experiences With Family Health Conversations at Residential Homes for Older People2016In: Clinical Nursing Research, ISSN 1054-7738, E-ISSN 1552-3799, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 560-582Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to highlight family members’ experiences of participating in Family Health Conversation (FamHC), based on families in which a family member was living in a residential home for older people. A total of 10 families and 22 family members participated in evaluating family interviews 1 month after participating in FamHC. The interviews were analyzed by qualitative content analysis. The main finding was being a part of FamHC increased family members’ insights, understanding, and communication within the family. Getting confirmation from nurses was essential to cope with the new life situation, which also meant that they felt comfortable to partly hand over the responsibility for the older person who moved to the residential home. By being open and expressing their feelings, a bad conscience could be relieved. These findings showed that FamHC could be helpful for family members in adapting to this novel situation.

  • 2.
    Johansson, Maria
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund.
    Flykt, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology and Social Work.
    Frank, Jens
    SLU, Riddarhyttan.
    Støen, Ole-Gunnar
    Norwegian Institute for Nature Research (NINA), Trondheim, Norway.
    Controlled exposure reduces fear of brown bears2019In: Human Dimensions of Wildlife, ISSN 1087-1209, E-ISSN 1533-158X, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 363-379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fear of large carnivores such as brown bears may restrict people’s outdoor activities regardless of experts’ estimated risk of attack. This research study empirically examined three exposure interventions in the form of guided walks intended to give people living in brown bear areas tools for coping with their fear. All interventions significantly reduced fear, decreased people’s perceived vulnerability, and increased their social trust in wildlife management authorities. The walk including an encounter with a radio-collared bear in a wild bear habitat resulted in the largest reduction in fear, followed by the walk in the wild bear habitat only and then the walk in a park with captive bears. The wild bear habitat walk was the intervention best suited for further development as it may be used in any area where bears occur and without affecting animal welfare. 

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