miun.sePublikasjoner
Endre søk
Begrens søket
1 - 2 of 2
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Treff pr side
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
Merk
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1.
    Kivimäki, Mika
    et al.
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; UCL, London, England.
    Pentti, Jaana
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Univ Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Ferrie, Jane E.
    UCL, London, England; Univ Bristol, Avon, England.
    Batty, G. David
    UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London WC1E 6BT, England..
    Nyberg, Solja T.
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Jokela, Markus
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Virtanen, Marianna
    Uppsala Univ, Uppsala.
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Stockholm Cty Council, Stockholm; Karolinska Inst, Stockholm.
    Dragano, Nico
    Univ Dusseldorf, Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Stockholm Cty Council, Stockholm; Jönköping Univ, Jönköping; Stockholm Univ, Stockholm.
    Goldberg, Marcel
    INSERM, Populat Based Epidemiol Cohorts Unit, Villejuif, France; Versailles St Quentin Univ, Villejuif, France.
    Knutsson, Anders
    Mittuniversitetet, Fakulteten för humanvetenskap, Avdelningen för hälsovetenskap.
    Koskenvuo, Markku
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Koskinen, Aki
    Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kouvonen, Anne
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; SWPS Univ Social Sci & Humanities Wroclaw, Wroclaw, Poland; Queens Univ Belfast, Belfast, North Ireland.
    Luukkonen, Ritva
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Oksanen, Tuula
    Rugulies, Reiner
    Natl Res Ctr Working Environm, Copenhagen, Denmark; Univ Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Siegrist, Johannes
    Univ Dusseldorf, Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Singh-Manoux, Archana
    UCL, London, England; Ctr Res Epidemiol & Populat Hlth, INSERM, Villejuif, France.
    Suominen, Sakari
    Univ Turku, Turku, Finland; Folkhälsan Res Ctr, Helsinki, Finland; Univ Skövde, Skövde; Univ Kent, Canterbury, Kent, England.
    Theorell, Tores
    Stockholm Univ, Stockholm; Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland.
    Vaananen, Ari
    Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland.
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Univ Turku, Turku, Finland; Turku Univ Hosp, Turku, Finland.
    Westerholm, Peter J. M.
    Uppsala Univ, Uppsala.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm Univ, Stockholm.
    Zins, Marie
    INSERM, Populat Based Epidemiol Cohorts Unit, Villejuif, France; Versailles St Quentin Univ, Villejuif, France.
    Strandberg, Timo
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki Univ Hosp, Helsinki, Finland; Univ Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Steptoe, Andrew
    UCL, London, England..
    Deanfield, John
    UCL, London, England.
    Work stress and risk of death in men and women with and without cardiometabolic disease: a multicohort study2018Inngår i: The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology, ISSN 2213-8587, E-ISSN 2213-8595, Vol. 6, nr 9, s. 705-713Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Although some cardiovascular disease prevention guidelines suggest a need to manage work stress in patients with established cardiometabolic disease, the evidence base for this recommendation is weak. We sought to clarify the status of stress as a risk factor in cardiometabolic disease by investigating the associations between work stress and mortality in men and women with and without pre-existing cardiometabolic disease. Methods In this multicohort study, we used data from seven cohort studies in the IPD-Work consortium, initiated between 1985 and 2002 in Finland, France, Sweden, and the UK, to examine the association between work stress and mortality. Work stress was denoted as job strain or effort-reward imbalance at work. We extracted individual-level data on prevalent cardiometabolic diseases (coronary heart disease, stroke, or diabetes [without differentiation by diabetes type]) at baseline. Work stressors, socioeconomic status, and conventional and lifestyle risk factors (systolic and diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, smoking status, BMI, physical activity, and alcohol consumption) were also assessed at baseline. Mortality data, including date and cause of death, were obtained from national death registries. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to study the associations of work stressors with mortality in men and women with and without cardiometabolic disease. Results We identified 102 633 individuals with 1 423 753 person-years at risk (mean follow-up 13.9 years [SD 3.9]), of whom 3441 had prevalent cardiometabolic disease at baseline and 3841 died during follow-up. In men with cardiometabolic disease, age-standardised mortality rates were substantially higher in people with job strain (149.8 per 10 000 person-years) than in those without (97.7 per 10 000 person-years; mortality difference 52.1 per 10 000 person-years; multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.68, 95% CI 1.19-2.35). This mortality difference for job strain was almost as great as that for current smoking versus former smoking (78.1 per 10 000 person-years) and greater than those due to hypertension, high total cholesterol concentration, obesity, physical inactivity, and high alcohol consumption relative to the corresponding lower risk groups (mortality difference 5.9-44.0 per 10 000 person-years). Excess mortality associated with job strain was also noted in men with cardiometabolic disease who had achieved treatment targets, including groups with a healthy lifestyle (HR 2.01, 95% CI 1.18-3.43) and those with normal blood pressure and no dyslipidaemia (6.17, 1.74-21.9). In all women and in men without cardiometabolic disease, relative risk estimates for the work stress-mortality association were not significant, apart from effort-reward imbalance in men without cardiometabolic disease (mortality difference 6.6 per 10 000 person-years; multivariable-adjusted HR 1.22, 1.06-1.41). Interpretation In men with cardiometabolic disease, the contribution of job strain to risk of death was clinically significant and independent of conventional risk factors and their treatment, and measured lifestyle factors. Standard care targeting conventional risk factors is therefore unlikely to mitigate the mortality risk associated with job strain in this population.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Nyberg, Solja T.
    et al.
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Batty, G. David
    UCL, London, England.
    Pentti, Jaana
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Univ Turku, Turku, Finland; Turku Univ Hosp, Turku, Finland.
    Virtanen, Marianna
    Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland; Uppsala Univ, Uppsala; Univ Stockholm, Stockholm.
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Stockholm Cty Council, Stockholm; Karolinska Inst, Stockholm.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Univ Stockholm, Stockholm; Jönköping Univ, Jönköping.
    Goldberg, Marcel
    Paris Descartes Univ, Paris, France; INSERM, Villejuif, France.
    Heikkila, Katriina
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, London, England; Royal Coll Surgeons England, London, England.
    Jokela, Markus
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Knutsson, Anders
    Mittuniversitetet, Fakulteten för humanvetenskap, Avdelningen för hälsovetenskap.
    Koskenvuo, Markku
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Lallukka, Tea
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland.
    Leineweber, Constanze
    Univ Stockholm, Stockholm.
    Lindbohm, Joni V.
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Madsen, Ida E. H.
    Natl Res Ctr Working Environm, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Hanson, Linda L. Magnusson
    Univ Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nordin, Maria
    Univ Stockholm, Stockholm; Umeå Univ, Umeå.
    Oksanen, Tuula
    Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland.
    Pietilainen, Olli
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Rahkonen, Ossi
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Rugulies, Reiner
    Natl Res Ctr Working Environm, Copenhagen, Denmark; Univ Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Shipley, Martin J.
    UCL, London, England; INSERM, Villejuif, France.
    Stenholm, Sari
    Univ Turku, Turku, Finland; Turku Univ Hosp, Turku, Finland; Univ Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
    Suominen, Sakari
    Univ Turku, Turku, Finland; Turku Univ Hosp, Turku, Finland; Univ Skövde, Skövde.
    Theorell, Tores
    Univ Stockholm, Stockholm.
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Univ Turku, Turku, Finland; Turku Univ Hosp, Turku, Finland.
    Westerholm, Peter J. M.
    Uppsala Univ, Uppsala; Univ Stockholm, Stockholm.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Zins, Marie
    Paris Descartes Univ, Paris, France.
    Hamer, Mark
    Loughborough Univ Technol, Loughborough, Leics, England.
    Singh-Manoux, Archana
    UCL, London, England.
    Bell, Joshua A.
    Univ Bristol, MRC, Bristol, Avon, England.
    Ferrie, Jane E.
    UCL, London, England; Univ Bristol, Bristol, Avon, England.
    Kivimaki, Mika
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; UCL, London, England.
    Obesity and loss of disease-free years owing to major non-communicable diseases: a multicohort study2018Inngår i: LANCET PUBLIC HEALTH, ISSN 2468-2667, Vol. 3, nr 10, s. E490-E497Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Obesity increases the risk of several chronic diseases, but the extent to which the obesity-related loss of disease-free years varies by lifestyle category and across socioeconomic groups is unclear. We estimated the number of years free from major non-communicable diseases in adults who are overweight and obese, compared with those who are normal weight. Methods We pooled individual-level data on body-mass index (BMI) and non-communicable diseases from men and women with no initial evidence of these diseases in European cohort studies from the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-Analysis in Working Populations consortium. BMI was assessed at baseline (1991-2008) and non-communicable diseases (incident type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, stroke, cancer, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) were ascertained via linkage to records from national health registries, repeated medical examinations, or self-report. Disease-free years from age 40 years to 75 years associated with underweight (BMI <18.5 kg/m(2)), overweight (>= 25 kg/m(2) to <30 kg/m(2)), and obesity (class I [mild] >= 30 kg/m(2) to < 35 kg/m(2); class II-III [severe] >= 35 kg/m(2)) compared with normal weight (>= 18.5 kg/m(2) to <25 kg/m(2)) were estimated. Findings Of 137 503 participants from ten studies, we excluded 6973 owing to missing data and 10 349 with prevalent disease at baseline, resulting in an analytic sample of 120 181 participants. Of 47 127 men, 211 (0.4%) were underweight, 21 468 (45.6%) normal weight, 20 738 (44.0%) overweight, 3982 (8.4%) class I obese, and 728 (1.5%) class II-III obese. The corresponding numbers among the 73 054 women were 1493 (2.0%), 44 760 (61.3%), 19 553 (26.8%), 5670 (7.8%), and 1578 (2.2%), respectively. During 1 328 873 person-years at risk (mean follow-up 11.5 years [range 6.3-18.6]), 8159 men and 8100 women developed at least one non-communicable disease. Between 40 years and 75 years, the estimated number of disease-free years was 29.3 (95% CI 28.8-29.8) in normal-weight men and 29.4 (28.7-30.0) in normal-weight women. Compared with normal weight, the loss of disease-free years in men was 1.8 (95% CI -1.3 to 4.9) for underweight, 1.1 (0.7 to 1.5) for overweight, 3.9 (2.9 to 4.9) for class I obese, and 8.5 (7.1 to 9.8) for class II-III obese. The corresponding estimates for women were 0.0 (-1.4 to 1.4) for underweight, 1.1 (0.6 to 1.5) for overweight, 2.7 (1.5 to 3.9) for class I obese, and 7.3 (6.1 to 8.6) for class II-III obese. The loss of disease-free years associated with class II-III obesity varied between 7.1 and 10.0 years in subgroups of participants of different socioeconomic level, physical activity level, and smoking habit. Interpretation Mild obesity was associated with the loss of one in ten, and severe obesity the loss of one in four potential disease-free years during middle and later adulthood. This increasing loss of disease-free years as obesity becomes more severe occurred in both sexes, among smokers and non-smokers, the physically active and inactive, and across the socioeconomic hierarchy.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 2 of 2
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf