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  • 1.
    Jong, Miek C.
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences. Louis Bolk Institute, Bunnik, The Netherlands.
    Boers, I.
    Louis Bolk Institute, Bunnik, The Netherlands.
    van Wietmarschen, H. A.
    Louis Bolk Institute, Bunnik, The Netherlands.
    Tromp, E.
    St. Antonius Ziekenhuis, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands.
    Busari, J. O.
    Zuyderland Medisch Centrum, Heerlen, the Netherlands.
    Wennekes, R.
    Zuyderland Medisch Centrum, Heerlen, the Netherlands.
    Snoeck, I.
    Isala, Zwolle, The Netherlands.
    Bekhof, J.
    Isala, Zwolle, The Netherlands.
    Vlieger, A. M.
    St. Antonius Ziekenhuis, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands.
    Hypnotherapy or transcendental meditation versus progressive muscle relaxation exercises in the treatment of children with primary headaches: a multi-centre, pragmatic, randomised clinical study2019In: European Journal of Pediatrics, ISSN 0340-6199, E-ISSN 1432-1076, Vol. 178, no 2, p. 147-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many children suffer from headaches. Since stress may trigger headaches, effective techniques to cope with stress are needed. We investigated the effectiveness of two mind-body techniques, transcendental meditation (TM) or hypnotherapy (HT), and compared them with progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) exercises (active control group). Children (9–18 years) suffering from primary headaches more than two times per month received either TM (N = 42), HT (N = 45) or PMR (N = 44) for 3 months. Primary outcomes were frequency of headaches and ≥ 50% reduction in headaches at 3 and 9 months. Secondary outcomes were adequate relief, pain coping, anxiety and depressive symptoms, somatisation and safety of treatment. Groups were comparable at baseline. Headache frequency was significantly reduced in all groups from 18.9 days per month to 12.5 and 10.5 at respectively 3 and 9 months (p < 0.001), with no significant differences between the groups. Clinically relevant headache reduction (≥ 50%) was observed in 41% and 47% of children at 3 and 9 months respectively, with no significant differences between the groups. No differences were observed in secondary outcome measures between the intervention groups. No adverse events were reported. Conclusion: All three techniques reduced primary headache in children and appeared to be safe. Trial registration: NTR 2955, 28 June 2011 (www.trialregister.nl)

    What is Known:

    • Stress may be an important trigger for both tension type headache and migraine in children.

    • Good data are lacking on the effect of transcendental meditation, hypnotherapy or progressive muscle relaxation as possible stress-reducing therapies in children with primary headaches.

    What is New:

    • Three non-pharmacological techniques, i.e., transcendental meditation, hypnotherapy and progressive muscle relaxation exercises, all result in a clinically significant reduction of headaches and use of pain medication.

    • No large differences between the three techniques were found, suggesting that children can choose either one of the three techniques based on personal preferences. 

  • 2.
    Pillas, Demetris
    et al.
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College London, Norfolk Place, London, W2 1PG, United Kingdom .
    Kaakinen, Marika
    Institute of Health Sciences, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland .
    Tzoulaki, Ioanna
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College London, Norfolk Place, London, W2 1PG, United Kingdom .
    Netuveli, Gopalakrishnan
    Department of Primary care and Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom .
    Rodriguez, Alina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology. Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College London, Norfolk Place, London, W2 1PG, United Kingdom .
    Fung, Erik
    Section of Cardiology, Heart and Vascular Center, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH, United States .
    Tammelin, Tuija H
    LIKES - Research Center for Sport and Health Sciences, Jyväskylä, Finland .
    Blane, David
    Department of Primary care and Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom .
    Millwood, Iona Y
    Clinical Trial Service Unit and Epidemiological Studies Unit (CTSU), University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom .
    Hardy, Rebecca
    MRC Unit for Lifelong Health and Ageing, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Royal Free and University College Medical School, London, United Kingdom .
    Sovio, Ulla
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom .
    Pouta, Anneli
    Department of Children, Young People, and Families, National Institute of Health and Welfare, Oulu, Finland .
    Hopstock, Laila Arnesdatter
    Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway .
    Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa
    Department of Clinical Sciences/ Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland .
    Laitinen, Jaana
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Oulu, Finland .
    Vaara, Sarianna
    Department of Children, Young People, and Families, National Institute of Health and Welfare, Oulu, Finland .
    Khan, Anokhi Ali
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College London, Norfolk Place, London, W2 1PG, United Kingdom .
    Chong, Raymond
    Department of Physical Therapy, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA, United States .
    Elliott, Paul
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College London, Norfolk Place, London, W2 1PG, United Kingdom .
    Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College London, Norfolk Place, London, W2 1PG, United Kingdom .
    Infant locomotive development and its association with adult blood pressure.2014In: European Journal of Pediatrics, ISSN 0340-6199, E-ISSN 1432-1076, Vol. 173, no 10, p. 1309-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    UNLABELLED: Evidence from animal models suggests that locomotion and blood pressure share common neurophysiological regulatory systems. As a result of this common regulation, we hypothesized that the development of locomotion in human infants would be associated with blood pressure levels in adulthood. The study sample comprised 4,347 individuals with measures of locomotive and non-locomotive neuromotor development in infancy and adult blood pressure levels within a longitudinal birth cohort study, the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966. Later development in all three stages of locomotive development during infancy was associated with higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels at age 31. For age of walking without support, 0.34 (95 % CI 0.07 to 0.60)-mm Hg higher SBP and 0.38 (95 % CI 0.15 to 0.62)-mm Hg higher DBP were estimated for each month of later achievement (P = 0.012 for SBP; P = 0.001 for DBP). No association was identified for non-locomotive neuromotor development.

    CONCLUSION: These results highlight the positive sequelae of advanced locomotive development during infancy, suggesting that the common regulatory systems between locomotion and blood pressure may influence the development of raised blood pressure over time.

  • 3. Vlieger, Arine
    et al.
    van Vliet, M
    Jong, Miek C
    Attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine: a national survey among paediatricians in the Netherlands2011In: European Journal of Pediatrics, ISSN 0340-6199, E-ISSN 1432-1076, Vol. 170, no 5, p. 619-624Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present survey was to assess attitudes, beliefs, experience, referral patterns and desire for education regarding complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies of paediatricians in the Netherlands. In 2009, the link to an anonymous, self-reporting, 30-item web-based questionnaire was mailed to all members of the Dutch Association of Paediatrics. The questionnaire included questions about demographics and practice characteristics, use of CAM by the paediatrician and/or his family, attitudes towards and knowledge of CAM, and inquiries about CAM use in their practice. A total of 343 (24%) paediatricians responded to the survey: 39% had used some kind of CAM therapy themselves during the past 2 years, of which supplements (64%) and herbal and/or homeopathic remedies (30%) were most frequently mentioned. The majority of the paediatricians (62%) seldom asked parents of patients about CAM use. Referrals to CAM doctors were made by approximately 30% of the paediatricians. In general, more than 50% of the surveyed paediatricians had little knowledge of CAM therapies. Predictors for a positive attitude towards CAM were own CAM use (p < 0.0001), age >45 years (p = 0.02) and perceived knowledge level of CAM (p < 0.005). In conclusion, a significant group of Dutch paediatricians has a positive attitude towards CAM and refers patients to CAM therapies. The majority of paediatricians, however, do not ask patients about CAM use and seem to lack sufficient knowledge on CAM.

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