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  • 1.
    Jong, Miek C.
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences. Louis Bolk Inst, Dept Nutr & Hlth, Bunnik, Netherlands.
    Boers, Inge
    Louis Bolk Inst, Dept Nutr & Hlth, Bunnik, Netherlands.
    van der Velden, Arjan P. Schouten
    St Jansdal Hosp, Dept Surg, Harderwijk, Netherlands.
    van der Meij, Suzan
    Flevo Hosp, Dept Surg, Almere, Netherlands.
    Goker, Emine
    Alexander Monro Hosp, Breast Canc Clin, Bilthoven, Netherlands.
    Timmer-Bonte, Anja N. J. H.
    Alexander Monro Hosp, Breast Canc Clin, Bilthoven, Netherlands.
    van Wietmarschen, Herman A.
    Louis Bolk Inst, Dept Nutr & Hlth, Bunnik, Netherlands.
    A Randomized Study of Yoga for Fatigue and Quality of Life in Women with Breast Cancer Undergoing (Neo) Adjuvant Chemotherapy2018In: Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, ISSN 1075-5535, E-ISSN 1557-7708, Vol. 24, no 9-10, p. 942-953Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To compare the effectiveness of yoga added to standard care (SC) versus SC only, in women with breast cancer during chemotherapy. Design: A multicenter pragmatic, randomized controlled study. Settings/Location: Three hospitals in the Netherlands. Subjects: Women with stage I-III breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy. Interventions: Women were randomized either to a program based on Dru Yoga, once a week yoga sessions for 12 weeks (N=47), or SC only (N=36). Outcome measures: Primary outcome fatigue (Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory [MFI]; general fatigue) and secondary outcomes fatigue (MFI, Fatigue Quality List [FQL]), quality of life (30-item Quality of Life Questionnaire-C of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer [EORTC-QLQ-C-30]) and psychological distress (Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale [HADS], Impact of Events Scale [IES]) were measured at baseline (T0), 3 months (T1), and 6 months (T2) and analyzed on observed cases. Other outcomes were adequate relief, reintegration to work, and adverse events. Results: No significant differences were found in general fatigue at T1 (MFI: yoga; 14.64.5 vs. SC; 14.2 +/- 4.2, p=0.987). Similar findings were observed for other fatigue (sub)scales of MFI and FQL and functional domains of EORTC. With respect to EORTCs symptom scales, women in the yoga group reported significantly less nausea and vomiting compared with SC at T2 (p=0.004), but not at T1 (p=0.807). Depressive symptoms were significantly lower with yoga at T1 (HADS: yoga; 4.7 +/- 4.1 vs. SC; 5.1 +/- 4.2, p=0.031). More women in the yoga group experienced adequate relief compared with SC at T1 (yoga; 51% vs. SC; 19%) and had returned to work at T2 (yoga; 53% vs. SC; 23%). No adverse events were reported with yoga. Conclusions: A Dru-based yoga program failed to demonstrate a significant beneficial effect on fatigue. Possible favorable effects of the yoga program on nausea and vomiting and early return to work in breast cancer survivors warrant further research.

  • 2.
    Klein-Laansma, Christien T
    et al.
    Louis Bolk Institute, Bunnik, The Netherlands.
    Jong, Mats
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    von Hagens, Cornelia
    University Women's Hospital, Universitätsfrauenklinik Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Jansen, Jean Pierre C H
    Louis Bolk Institute, Bunnik, The Netherlands.
    van Wietmarschen, Herman
    Louis Bolk Institute, Bunnik, The Netherlands.
    Jong, Miek C.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences. Louis Bolk Institute, Bunnik, The Netherlands.
    Semi-Individualized Homeopathy Add-On Versus Usual Care Only for Premenstrual Disorders: A Randomized, Controlled Feasibility Study2018In: Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, ISSN 1075-5535, E-ISSN 1557-7708, Vol. 24, no 7, p. 684-693Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMS/PMDD) bother a substantial number of women. Homeopathy seems a promising treatment, but it needs investigation using reliable study designs. The feasibility of organizing an international randomized pragmatic trial on a homeopathic add-on treatment (usual care [UC] + HT) compared with UC alone was evaluated.

    DESIGN: A multicenter, randomized, controlled pragmatic trial with parallel groups.

    SETTINGS/LOCATION: The study was organized in general and private homeopathic practices in the Netherlands and Sweden and in an outpatient university clinic in Germany.

    SUBJECTS: Women diagnosed as having PMS/PMDD, based on prospective daily rating by the daily record of severity of problems (DRSP) during a period of 2 months, were included and randomized.

    INTERVENTIONS: Women were to receive UC + HT or UC for 4 months. Homeopathic medicine selection was according to a previously tested prognostic questionnaire and electronic algorithm. Usual care was as provided by the women's general practitioner according to their preferences.

    OUTCOME MEASURES: Before and after treatment, the women completed diaries (DRSP), the measure yourself concerns and well-being, and other questionnaires. Intention-to-treat (ITT) and per protocol (PP) analyses were performed.

    RESULTS: In Germany, the study could not proceed because of legal limitations. In Sweden, recruitment proved extremely difficult. In the Netherlands and Sweden, 60 women were randomized (UC + HT: 28; UC: 32), data of 47/46 women were analyzed (ITT/PP). After 4 months, relative mean change of DRSP scores in the UC + HT group was significantly better than in the UC group (p = 0.03).

    CONCLUSIONS: With respect to recruitment and different legal status, it does not seem feasible to perform a larger, international, pragmatic randomized trial on (semi-)individualized homeopathy for PMS/PMDD. Since the added value of HT compared with UC was demonstrated by significant differences in symptom score changes, further studies are warranted.

  • 3.
    Lundberg, Kristina
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Kristiansen, Lisbeth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Jong, Miek C
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Jong, Mats
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    District Nurses Experiences of Working with Health Promotion and Lifestyle Interventions Among Patients at Risk of Developing Cardiovascular Disease2014In: Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, ISSN 1075-5535, E-ISSN 1557-7708, Vol. 20, no 5, p. A118-A118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: In preventive health work it is possible to map risk factors at healthy individuals which include information and advice aiming to decrease the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. This preventive health care is in Sweden carried out primarily by the district nurses and they have a key role in promoting health and prevent cardiovascular disease. The aim of the study was to examine district nurses' experiences of working with health promotion among patients with risk factors of cardiovascular disease, and to identify possibilities and obstacles for prevention work in the practical reality.

    Methods: The study has been carried out with a qualitative approach where narrative interviews were performed with a total of 12 district nurses working at health centers in north Sweden. Data transcripts were analyzed with qualitative content analysis.

    Results: The participants express that their work in health promotion is an essence of the job as district nurse. It gives an opportunity to promote healthier lifestyle on an individual level with direct effects on patients' health. Participants are clear about what should be included in the preventive work and mention the topics of diet, exercise, tobacco, alcohol habits and obesity. The district nurses state that education in Motivational Interviewing, (MI), in Physical Activity on Prescription, (PAP) and the colleagues attitudes are important facilitators for making the health promotive work to function in the practical reality. Lack of knowledge (own and among colleagues) and inadequate organizational structures constitute obstacles.

    Conclusion: District nurses are unanimous about what should be included preventive health care. It is experienced as an important part of their duties but has sometimes difficulties to prioritize it. Furthermore, the district nurses consider that knowledge within MI, PAP and the employees' attitudes constitute possibilities while one sees lack of time, negative attitudes and inadequate structures that obstacles for the preventive work.

  • 4.
    Sjöling, Mats
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Rolleri, Marianne
    Landstinget Västernorrland.
    Englund, Erling
    Landstinget Västernorrland.
    Auricular acupuncture versus sham acupuncture in the treatment of women suffering from insomnia2008In: Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, ISSN 1075-5535, E-ISSN 1557-7708, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 39-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Improvement in sleep parameters in relation to acupuncture treatment is often found and referredto as being a positive side-effect in the treatment of other illnesses. There is a lack of randomized studies,which primarily study the direct effect of acupuncture on sleep.Objectives: To investigate whether or not auricular acupuncture has an effect on sleep parameters amongpeople with insomnia.Design: A single-blind, randomized pilot study where the treatment group received auricular acupuncturetreatment (AAT) on active points and the control group received AAT on sham points during a 6-week treatmentperiod.Setting: Participants were recruited from the psychiatric outpatient clinics in the geographical area connectedto a local hospital in central Sweden.Subjects: In all, 28 women were included in the study, with 14 in each group. Their mean and median agewas 53 years.Outcome Measures: Sleep parameters were obtained by using the Karolinska Sleep Diary.Results: No statistically significant differences were observed between the groups relating to parameters associatedwith the definition of insomnia. The treatment group experienced that it was easier to wake up in themorning compared with the control group (repeated-measures analysis of variance, p 0.04). Both groupsshowed a statistically significant recovery in subjective sleep parameters during the study period (weeks 1–6)compared with baseline values (week 0).Conclusions: Only modest evidence was found supporting the hypothesis that AAT may have an effect oninsomnia. Least improvements were found in total sleep time and number of awakenings, 2 parameters directlyassociated with the definition of insomnia. AAT may have a role in the treatment of insomnia, especially incombination with other treatments such as cognitive behavioral therapy. This study provides an example of how to perform studies using alternative therapies for sleep disorders.

  • 5.
    van Vliet, Marja
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Jong, Mats
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Jong, Miek
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    A Barrier Opener for Personal Insights: Nursing and Medical Students Experiences of Participating in an Experiential Mind-Body Skills Program2014In: Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, ISSN 1075-5535, E-ISSN 1557-7708, Vol. 20, no 5, p. A98-A99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study aimed to obtain an in-depth understanding on how nursing-, and medical students participating in a Mind-Body Medicine Skills program experienced participation and what the program has meant to them on a personal and a professional level.

    Methods: Based on a qualitative approach, first and second year students were interviewed 3 months after completion of the program. Interviews were analyzed with a qualitative content analysis. As a part of a larger study evaluating the effects on stress, empathy and self-reflection, this qualitative sub-study included 10 nursing students from Mid Sweden University, Sweden, and 10 medical students from University of Utrecht, The Netherlands. The Mind-Body Medicine Skills program was adapted from the program developed at Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington DC, and included 11 experiential sessions were the students were introduced to different mind-body techniques (mindfulness meditation, guided imagery, bio-feedback etc).

    Results: Data analysis is ongoing and more complete analysis will be presented at the conference. In preliminary analysis an overarching theme has been identified: The Mind-Body Medicine Skills program as a barrier opener of personal insights, and a starting point for a new journey in life. The participants describe how the course have made it possible for them obtain insights about themselves, both by self reflection in relation to experiences and through listening to the stories of the others. It is also described that they currently do not at all times explicitly use the direct techniques, but more separate personalized elements, which they have been able to incorporate in everyday situations: i.e. moments of mindfulness while walking, biking or eating, or taking a moment of breathing and relaxation before dealing with problematic situations with others.

    Conclusion: Participation in the Mind-Body Medicine Skills program can on an individual basis have a deep and profound meaning, stimulating to personal growth.

  • 6.
    van Vliet, Marja
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Jong, Mats
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Jong, Miek C
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Effects of a Mind-Body Medicine Skills Program on Perceived Stress, Empathy and Self-Reflection Among Medicine and Nursing Students: A Quantitative Study2014In: Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, ISSN 1075-5535, E-ISSN 1557-7708, Vol. 20, no 5, p. A99-A99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study aimed to implement and quantitatively evaluate the Mind-Body Medicine (MBM) Skills program among Dutch medical and Swedish nursing students.

    Methods: The MBM Skills program was piloted among second year medical students at Utrecht University and first year nursing students at Mid Sweden University in the period 2011–2013. During the course, the participating students learned and practiced Mind-Body techniques such as relaxation, meditation, guided imagery, biofeedback, physical exercise, art, music and movement. The effects of the MBM skills program on perceived stress, empathy, and self-reflection were evaluated by the following validated scales: Perceived Stress Scale, Interpersonal Reactivity Index, and Groningen Reflection Ability Scale. Participating students and controls answer(-ed) the different questionnaires at baseline, at the end of the course, and 6 and 12 months later.

    Results: In total, 55 medical students and 49 nursing students have participated in the MBM skills program. Baseline analysis (age, gender, mind-body experience, perceived stress, four subscales of the IRI, and self-reflection) demonstrated that participating nursing students were significantly older (p<0.001), and had higher scores for empathetic concern (p<0.001) and self-reflection (p=0.001) than participating medical students. Further, baseline analysis showed no significant differences in baseline characteristics between intervention and control group for medical students, except from significantly higher levels of perceived stress among controls (p=0.008). Regarding nursing students, no differences were found between intervention and control group, except from significantly higher scores for empathetic concern among participants (p=0.023).

    Conclusion: We have successfully implemented the MBM Skills program for medical and nursing students. Baseline analysis showed that participants of the course were not a selected group, except from perceived stress among medical students and empathetic concern among nursing students. Data on the effects of the MBM skills program on perceived stress, empathic concern and self-reflection are currently being evaluated and will be presented at the conference.

1 - 6 of 6
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