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  • 1.
    Pojskic, Haris
    et al.
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Pagaduan, Jeffrey
    College of Human Kinetics, University of the Philippines.
    Babajic, Fuad
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Uzicanin, Edin
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Muratovic, Melika
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Tuzla.
    Tomljanovic, Mario
    School of Kinesiology, University of Split.
    Acute effects of prolonged intermittent low-intensity isometric warm-up schemes on jump, sprint, and agility performance in collegiate soccer players2015In: Biology of Sport, ISSN 0860-021X, E-ISSN 2083-1862, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 129-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of different warm-up interventions on jump, sprint and agility performance in collegiate soccer players. Twenty-one healthy male college soccer players (age: 20.14 ± 1.65 years; body height: 179.9 ± 8.34 cm; body mass: 74.4 ± 13.0 kg; % body fat: 9.45 ± 4.8) participated in the study. Subjects underwent four different randomized warm-up protocols separated by at least 48 hours. The warm-up schemes were: 1. no conditioning contraction protocol (NCC); 2. dynamic stretching (DS); 3. prolonged intermittent low-intensity isometric exercise (ST); and, 4. ST with an additional external load equal to 30% of body weight (ST + 30% BW). All interventions were preceded by a general warm-up. Results from one-way repeated measures ANOVA demonstrated a significant difference in countermovement jump (CMJ) at F(3,60) = 10.2, ηρ² = 0.337, p < 0.01. Post hoc analysis revealed a significant difference in CMJ performance in DS when compared to NCC and ST + 30% BW. No significant difference in CMJ was observed between DS and ST. CMJ scores in NCC, ST, and ST + 30% BW were non-significant. There was a significant difference in speed; F(3, 60) = 6.61, ηρ² = 0.248, p < 0.01. Post hoc analysis revealed significantly better time in DS than NCC and ST. However, no difference in speed was observed between DS and ST + 30% BW. Similarly, speed was similar in NCC, ST and ST + 30% BW. A significant difference in agility performance was also observed; F(3, 60) = 24.1, ηρ²= 0.546, p < 0.01. Post hoc analysis revealed significantly greater performance gains in DS than NCC. No significant difference in agility was observed in DS, ST and ST + 30% BW. In conclusion, a prolonged intermittent low-intensity isometric protocol using bodyweight only showed similar benefits with dynamic stretching in countermovement jump performance. When the same isometric condition with additional load equal to 30% of bodyweight was applied, effects in speed and agility were similar to dynamic stretching.

  • 2.
    Zinner, C.
    et al.
    Univ Wurzburg, Dept Sport Sci, Judenbuhlweg 11, D-97082 Wurzburg, Germany.
    Krueger, M.
    German Sport Univ Cologne, Inst Training Sci & Sport Informat, Sportpk Mungersdorf 6, D-50933 Cologne, Germany.
    Reed, J. L.
    Univ Ottawa, Fac Hlth Sci, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5, Canada.
    Kohl-Bareis, M.
    Univ Appl Sci Koblenz, RheinAhrCampus Remagen, Landau, Germany.
    Holmberg, Hans-Christer
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Sperlich, Billy
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences. Univ Wurzburg, Dept Sport Sci, Judenbuhlweg 11, D-97082 Wurzburg, Germany.
    Exposure to a combination of heat and hyperoxia during cycling at submaximal intensity does not alter thermoregulatory responses2016In: Biology of Sport, ISSN 0860-021X, E-ISSN 2083-1862, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 71-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that breathing hyperoxic air (FinO2 = 0.40) while exercising in a hot environment exerts negative effects on the total tissue level of haemoglobin concentration (tHb); core (T-core) and skin (T-skin) temperatures; muscle activity; heart rate; blood concentration of lactate; pH; partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) and carbon dioxide; arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2); and perceptual responses. Ten well-trained male athletes cycled at submaximal intensity at 21 degrees C or 33 degrees C in randomized order: first for 20 min while breathing normal air (FinO2 = 0.21) and then 10 min with FinO2 = 0.40 (HOX). At both temperatures, SaO2 and PaO2, but not tHb, were increased by HOX. Tskin and perception of exertion and thermal discomfort were higher at 33 degrees C than 21 degrees C (p < 0.01), but independent of FinO2. Tcore and muscle activity were the same under all conditions (p > 0.07). Blood lactate and heart rate were higher at 33 degrees C than 21 degrees C. In conclusion, during 30 min of submaximal cycling at 21 degrees C or 33 degrees C, T-core, T-skin and T-body, tHb, muscle activity and ratings of perceived exertion and thermal discomfort were the same under normoxic and hyperoxic conditions. Accordingly, breathing hyperoxic air (FinO2 = 0.40) did not affect thermoregulation under these conditions.

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