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  • 1.
    Audulv, Åsa
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Asplund, Kenneth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Norbergh, Karl-Gustaf
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    The integration of chronic illness self-management2012In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 332-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-management is crucial for people living with chronic diseases, but the actual process of integrating self-management has not been explored in depth. In this article, we investigate the integration of self-management into the lives of people with chronic illness. In this longitudinal study, we used an interpretive description approach. Twenty-one individuals were interviewed regularly during the first 3 years after they were diagnosed with a chronic condition. We found self-management integration to be an ongoing process that included four phases: seeking effective self-management strategies, considering costs and benefits, creating routines and plans of action, and negotiating self-management that fits one's life. The participants managed the phases according to their context, e.g., illness experience, life situation, personal beliefs, and social support. Health care providers should therefore facilitate self-management integration by providing support that is adjusted to the person's phase of self-management integration and life context.

  • 2.
    Enarsson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University.
    Sandman, P O
    Umeå University.
    Hellzén, Ove
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    The preservation of order: The use of common approach among staff toward clients in long-term psychiatric care2007In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 718-729Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors performed this grounded theory study to gain a deeper understanding of the kinds of social processes that lead to a need among psychiatric nursing staff to reach a common approach on how to act toward individual clients in long-term psychiatric care. They present a theory about the development of such common approaches among staff. The main findings were that in psychiatric group dwellings, when the internal order is perceived as having been disturbed, the staff preserve or restore the internal order by formulating and reaching a common approach. The staff negotiated with each other to achieve an agreement on how to act and behave toward the individual client. The authors isolate and describe different types of order-disturbing incidents and the common approaches taken by the staff in dealing with them. However, their data also show that staff often had difficulties in maintaining a common approach over time.

  • 3. Juuso, P.
    et al.
    Skär, L.
    Olsson, M.
    Söderberg, Siv
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Meanings of being received and met by others as experienced by women with fibromyalgia2014In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 24, no 10, p. 1381-1390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a common chronic pain syndrome that mostly affects middle-aged women. Our aim with this study was to elucidate meanings of being received and met by others as experienced by women with FM. Interviews with a narrative approach were conducted with 9 women. We analyzed the transcribed interviews with a phenomenological hermeneutical interpretation. The findings revealed two themes: being seen as a malingerer and being acknowledged. Meanings of being received and met by others, as experienced by women with FM, can be understood as a movement between the two perspectives. When they were acknowledged, their feelings of security and trust increased, but the women could not rely on this because others received and met them in such an unpredictable manner. © The Author(s) 2014.

  • 4. Olsson, M.
    et al.
    Skär, L.
    Söderberg, Siv
    Meanings of feeling well for women with multiple sclerosis2010In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 20, no 9, p. 1254-1261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In research concerning multiple sclerosis (MS), the factors that impact on people's well-being and quality of life have been studied, but little has been written about what it means to feel well for women with MS. Therefore, in this study our aim was to describe meanings of feeling well for women with MS. We interviewed 15 women with MS, and a phenomenological hermeneutic interpretation was utilized to analyze the interviews. Through this study it can be understood that finding a pace where daily life goes on means that women with MS feel well when the illness is kept in check and is not the dominant experience. The findings of this study can be used to confirm women's experiences of feeling well, despite living with the consequences of MS. Health care professionals will find the results of this study useful when they reflect on and formulate the care of women with MS when attempting to support the latter's desire to feel well in their daily lives. © The Author(s) 2010.

  • 5. Olsson, M.
    et al.
    Stafström, L.
    Söderberg, Siv
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Meanings of fatigue for women with Parkinson's disease2013In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 741-748Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The existing knowledge of women's experiences of living with Parkinson's disease and fatigue is limited. To gain first-hand knowledge, we interviewed 11 women using a phenomenological hermeneutic interpretation. The results indicate that the familiar daily routines of women with Parkinson's disease had changed in the sense that their bodily attachment to the world had been altered. The body no longer provided smooth access to the surrounding world; rather, the body served as a barrier to daily living. In practice, understanding this barrier can be significant in recognizing how to create positive conditions that support the women's experiences and how to formulate their care in congruence with their needs. © The Author(s) 2013.

  • 6.
    Sundin, Karin
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå.
    Jansson, L.
    Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå.
    The meaning of skilled care providers' relationship with stroke and aphasia patients2001In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 308-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about the reciprocal influence of communication difficulties on the care relationship. To illuminate care providers' lived experiences of relationships with stroke and aphasia patients, narrative interviews were conducted with providers particularly successful at communicating with patients. A phenomenological hermeneutic analysis of the narratives revealed three themes: Calling forth responsibility through fragility, restoring the patient's dignity, and being in a state of understanding. The analysis disclosed caring with regard to the patient's desire, which has its starting point in intersubjective relationship and interplay, in which nonverbal communication is essential--that is, open participation while meeting the patient as a presence. Thus, care providers prepare for deep fellowship, or communion, by being available. They described an equality with patients, interpreted as fraternity and reciprocity, that is a necessary element in presence as communion. The works of Marcel, Hegel, Stern, and Ricoeur provided the theoretical framework for the interpretation.

  • 7. Söderberg, Siv
    et al.
    Lundman, B.
    Norberg, A.
    Struggling for dignity: The meaning of women's experiences of living with fibromyalgia1999In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 575-587Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a common chronic pain syndrome with an obscure etiology, which mostly afflicts middle-aged women. In this study, 14 women with FM were interviewed about the meaning of living with the illness. A phenomenological-hermeneutic method was used to analyze and interpret the interview texts. The findings show that being a woman with FM means living a life greatly influenced by the illness in various ways. The women's experiences of living with FM were presented in three major interlaced themes: loss of freedom, threat to integrity, and a struggle to achieve relief and understanding. This study highlights the importance of meeting people suffering in illness with respect for their human dignity. The care of women with FM must empower the women to bring to bear their own resources so that they can manage to live with the illness.

  • 8.
    Warne, Maria
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Snyder, Kristen
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Education.
    Gillander Gådin, Katja
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Promoting an Equal and Healthy Environment: Swedish Students' View of the Daily Life at School2013In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 23, no 10, p. 1354-1368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Education is an important factor in health equity, but many students still do not complete high school. A focus on the school context rather than on individual problems might help to create a supportive environment for health and learning. In this study we explored factors that promote health and learning from the perspective of vocational and low-achieving high school students in Sweden. We used grounded theory with a constructivist orientation, informed and sensitized by the concept of salutogenesis. Students from a school in a mid-sized municipality in Sweden participated, and we collected data using the photovoice method and interviews. Students identified general factors as significant to their well-being and success in school. The main theme, "promoting driving forces for health and learning," emerged from the categories "longing to be seen by teachers," "longing for support," and "longing for recuperation."

  • 9. Öhman, M.
    et al.
    Söderberg, Siv
    The experiences of close relatives living with a person with serious chronic illness2004In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 396-410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Living with serious chronic illness has a directly threatening effect on the life course of healthy relatives. The aim of this study was to elucidate the meaning of close relatives' experiences of living with a person with serious, chronic illness. Using a narrative approach, the authors interviewed 13 spouses and 1 daughter about the meaning of their experiences. They used a phenomenological hermeneutic method to interpret the interview text. The structural analysis revealed three major themes: A Shrinking Life, Forced to Take Responsibility, and Struggling to Keep Going. Close relatives in this study seemed to be living lives characterized by a reduced sense of individual freedom and an increased sense of responsibility for the care of the ill person. It means struggling to obtain the strength to manage their duty and an inner sense of community and of solidarity. The authors interpret the findings in the light of the works of philosophers who have described ethical demands and natural love between people. © 2004 Sage Publications.

  • 10. Öhman, M.
    et al.
    Söderberg, Siv
    Lundman, B.
    Hovering between suffering and enduring: The meaning of living with serious chronic illness2003In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 528-542Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Illness is part of life and hence always has a place in a life history. All that went on before the time of the illness, how life was in the past and what hopes and dreams were interrupted and changed, all influence the experiences of illness. The authors interviewed 5 women and 5 men with different kinds of serious chronic illnesses and used phenomenological hermeneutic method to interpret the transcribed interviews. They present the findings in three major themes: experiencing the body as a hindrance, being alone in illness, and struggling for normalcy. Participants seemed to hover between an escape from the emotional suffering pain of illness and the emotionless state of enduring. The comprehensive understanding illuminated that living with a serious chronic illness means living a life that is hovering between enduring and suffering but also including the process of reformulation of the self. © 2003 Sage Publications.

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