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  • 1.
    Landstedt, Evelina
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Asplund, Kenneth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Gillander Gådin, Katja
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Understanding adolescent mental health: the influence of social processes, doing gender and gendered power relations2009In: Sociology of Health and Illness, ISSN 0141-9889, E-ISSN 1467-9566, Vol. 31, no 7, p. 962-978Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite a well-documented gender pattern in adolescent mental health, research investigating possible explanatory factors from a gender-theoretical approach is scarce. This paper reports a grounded theory study based on 29 focus groups. The aim was to explore 16- to 19-year-old students' perceptions of what is significant for mental health, and to apply a gender analysis to the findings in order to advance understanding of the gender pattern in adolescent mental health. Significant factors were identified in three social processes categories, including both positive and negative aspects: (1) social interactions, (2) performance and (3) responsibility. Girls more often experienced negative aspects of these processes, placing them at greater risk for mental health problems. Boys' more positive mental health appeared to be associated with their low degree of responsibility-taking and beneficial positions relative to girls. Negotiating cultural norms of femininity and masculinity seemed to be more strenuous for girls, which could place them at a disadvantage with regard to mental health. Social factors and processes (particularly responsibility), gendered power relations and constructions of masculinities and femininities should be acknowledged as important for adolescent mental health.

     

     

  • 2.
    Strandh, Mattias
    et al.
    Sociologiska institutionen, Umeå universitet, Sweden.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Umeå universitet, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Karina
    Sociologiska institutionen, Umeå universitet, Sweden.
    Nordenmark, Mikael
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Russel, Helen
    The Economic and Social Research Institute, Ireland.
    Unemployment, gender and mental health: The role of the gender regime2013In: Sociology of Health and Illness, ISSN 0141-9889, E-ISSN 1467-9566, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 649-665Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Existing research suggests that gender differences in the effect of unemployment on mental health are related to the different positions and roles that are available for men and women in society and the family; roles that are connected with their different psychosocial and economic need for employment. The aim of this article is to analyse the role of gender in the relationship between unemployment and mental wellbeing in Sweden, representing a gender regime with a similar need for employment among women and men, and Ireland, representing a gender regime in which the need for employment differs between women and men. The results, based on longitudinal data from the two countries, show that unemployment was more negatively related to mental health among men than among women in Ireland, while men and women were equally affected by unemployment in Sweden. Factors related to the family and economic situation, as well as gendered selection into the unemployment population, explains the difference in mental health between unemployed men and women in Ireland. The overall conclusion is that the context has a major influence on the relationship between unemployment, gender and mental health.

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