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  • 1. Ahlström, B H
    et al.
    Skärsäter, I
    Danielson, Ella
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Major depression in a family: what happens and how to manage - a case study2007In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 28, no 7, p. 691-706Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Major depression challenges the ways of living for both individuals and families. The aim of this study was to describe what happens and how to manage major depression in a family. The case in this paper is a family with a mother who is suffering major depression and her son and daughter. Narrative interviews and qualitative content analysis were conducted. The findings revealed six themes: "a stealthy intruder," "moving slowly to helplessness," "saving the situation," "protecting oneself and others," "conveying things that are beyond words," and the "dispersal of shadows." These themes elucidated the family members' varying views of depression and the unique ways they managed the situation.

     

     

  • 2.
    Eivergård, Kristina
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Enmarker, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences. Högskolan i Gävle.
    Hellzen, Ove
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    The Talk About the Psychiatric Patient2016In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 37, no 10, p. 756-764Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Essential to psychiatric nursing practice and care, verbal handovers and ward rounds are reporting systems for communication that shapes psychiatric staff's ability to recognize, understand, and construct patients, as well as patients' ability to construct themselves. Given the centrality of such language in psychiatric practice, the aim of this study was to describe how psychiatric staff talk about patients in psychiatric wards, what their talk encompasses, and what consequences it might pose for patient care. Empirical data were collected from audio recordings of staff discussions of patients during nine verbal handovers and three ward rounds in six different general psychiatric wards in mid and southern Sweden. Findings showed that to describe patients' mood, characteristics, and behavior, nurses used culturally common words and concepts related to three themes-good patients, bad patients, and to stay or be discharged-and six subthemes-looking well, looking poorly, desirable patients, undesirable patients, continuing work, and being discharged. However, since assessments of and decisions about patients' conditions and care used everyday language and did not involve patients' participation, opportunities for patients to participate in their own care were rare.

  • 3.
    Eivergård, Kristina
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences. Ersta Sköndal .
    Enmarker, Ingela
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Livholts, Mona
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Aléx, Lena
    Umeå Universitet.
    Hellzén, Ove
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    The Importance of Being Acceptable: Psychiatric Staffs’ Talk about Women Patients in Forensic Care2019In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 124-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Currently, women comprise about ten percent of those sentenced to psychiatric forensic clinics in Sweden. Those who are sentenced to forensic care because of offending and violent behaviour have already taken a step away from the usually expected female behaviour. On the other hand, there are many women in forensic care who have not committed crimes, but who instead selfharm. Studies have identified a gender bias in diagnosing and care in psychiatric settings, but there are few studies conducted on women in forensic care. The present study therefore examined how the situation of women patients and female norms are expressed in the staff’s talk about these women during verbal handovers and ward rounds at a forensic clinic in Sweden. The aim was to explore how psychiatric staff, in a context of verbal handovers and ward rounds, talk about women who have been committed to forensic psychiatric care, and what consequences this might have for the care of the patients. The content of speech was examined using audio recordings and a method of analysis that was inspired by thematic analysis. The analysis identified that the staff talked about the women in a way that indicates that they expected the women to follow the rules and take responsibility for their bodies in order to be regarded as acceptable patients.                        

  • 4.
    Hedman Ahlström, B.
    et al.
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, I.
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Danielson, Ella
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Children's view of a major depression affecting a parent in the family2011In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 32, no 9, p. 560-567Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to elucidate, from the children's perspective, the meaning for family life of a parent suffering a major depression disorder. Eight children and young adults were interviewed. Phenomenological-hermeneutic analysis generated two themes: (1) "Being a rescuing observer" with the subthemes, "Being attentive" and "Being considerate," and (2) "Being a frustrated observer" with the subthemes, "feeling discomfort" and "being out of it." Children's lives alternate between responsibility and loneliness as they wait for reciprocity in family life to return to normal. Children need support in order to manage their sense of responsibility and loneliness adequately.

  • 5.
    Hellzen, Ove
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Stordal, Eystein
    Hospital Namsos, Namsos, Norway and Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Grav, Siv
    Nord-Trøndelag Univercity College, Namsos, Norway.
    Romild, Ulla Kristina
    Levanger Hospital, Health Trust Nord-Trøndelag, Levanger, Norway, and Swedish National Institute of Public Health, Östersund, Sweden.
    The relationship among neuroticism, extraversion, and depression in the HUNT Study: in relation to age and gender.2012In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 33, no 11, p. 777-785Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between personality and depression in a general population in relation to gender and age. The Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (2006–2008), a large cross-sectional survey, was used. The sample consists of 35,832 men (16,104) and women (19,728) aged 20–89 years, living in the Nord-Trøndelag County of Norway, with valid ratings on the depression subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ). This study demonstrates a relationship between depression and both neuroticism and extraversion in a general population. Older people score low more often on Extraversion (E) than younger people. Interactions were observed between neuroticism and age, gender, and extraversion with depression. The interaction term indicates a high score on Neuroticism (N) enhanced by introversion, older age, and being a male with depression. The findings suggest that health professionals may need to put extra effort into the care of patients with low extraversion and high neuroticism, in order to help those patients avoid depression.

    Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/01612840.2012.713082

  • 6. Jönsson Dahlqvist, Patrik
    et al.
    Wijk, Helle
    Skärsater, Ingela
    Danielson, Ella
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Persons living with bipolar disorder: Their view of the illness and the future2008In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 29, no 11, p. 1217-1236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to describe the meaning of living with bipolar disorder (BD) based on individuals' views of the illness and their future. Interviews were conducted with 18 participants who resided in Sweden and had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder. Qualitative content analysis was employed. The findings revealed that daily life of those with BD was characterized by insecurity and challenges of accepting, understanding, and managing the illness. Increased hope of being able to influence the condition and receiving support to achieve a stable structure in life facilitates the management of daily life. Further research is needed on the next of kins' experiences of living with persons with BD.

  • 7. Lindgren, E.
    et al.
    Söderberg, Siv
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Skär, L.
    Swedish Young Adults' Experiences of Psychiatric Care during Transition to Adulthood2015In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 182-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of young adults with mental illness and the need of psychiatric care has increased during the last decades. The aim of the study was to explore young adults' experiences of psychiatric care during transition to adulthood. Individual interviews were conducted with 11 young adults and analysed according to Grounded Theory. The analyses results showed that support was a prerequisite for transition to adulthood and striving to reach recovery. By being encountered as a person and with a supportive environment, young adults can be motivated to continue care and be encouraged to express feelings. © 2015 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.

  • 8.
    Lindgren, Eva
    et al.
    Lulea University of Technonogy, Department of Health Science, Lulea, Sweden .
    Söderberg, Siv
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Skär, Lisa
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Department of Health, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Being a parent to a young adult with mental illness in transition to adulthood2016In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 98-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parents of young adults with mental illness may face a continued demand for support, even though their children have reached the age of majority. The aim of this study was to explore relatives experiences of parenting a young adult with mental illness in transition to adulthood. Individual interviews were conducted and analysed according to Grounded Theory. The results showed that relatives experienced powerlessness and a sense of inescapable duty with limited possibilities to be relieved. With a family nursing approach, relatives can be supported and, when the young adults needs of care are met, they can be relieved from their burden of responsibility.

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