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  • 1.
    Hellzén, Ove
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Kristiansen, Lisbeth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Norbergh, Karl-Gustaf
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Being an outsider: nurses' statements about a vignette of an elderly resident with a schizophrenia diagnosis and dementia behaviour.2004In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 213-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an exploratory study of nurses' approach to elderly people with a diagnosis of long-term schizophrenia, the aim was to investigate nurses' views of the care of an elderly fictitious person with long-term schizophrenia. All the nurses in one municipality in northern Sweden working at seven different units were investigated. A vignette, which was based on a case description in a previous study of an 84-year-old woman with severe dementia and problematic behaviour, was used after a minor alteration. In this study, the woman's age in the case description was changed from 84 to 68 years and the diagnosis was changed from severe dementia to long-term schizophrenia; otherwise, the description was the same as in the original case. The main finding was the nurses' inability to see the resident as anything other than what the 'label', the diagnosis, said. The nurses are interpreted as being caught in a dilemma of loyalty - on the one hand, the loyalty to the organization with its traditional goals and means and, on the other hand, the loyalty to the resident with her wishes in the forefront of their minds.

  • 2. Johansson, I M
    et al.
    Skärsäter, I
    Danielson, Ella
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Encounters in a locked psychiatric ward environment2007In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 366-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This focused ethnographic study aims at describing encounters in the healthcare environment on a locked psychiatric ward. It was carried out in Sweden on an acute psychiatric ward for patients with affective and eating disorders. Data were collected through participant observations and informal interviews, and analysed by qualitative content analysis. The result shows that the healthcare environment on this locked psychiatric ward offered a space for encounters between people, in a continuum from professional care to private meetings and social events. It included joy and friendship as well as unintentional insights into other patients' suffering. The characteristics of the encounters formed three themes: the caring relationship, the uncaring relationship and the unrecognized relationship. The caring and the uncaring relationship concerned relationships between staff and patients or their next of kin. These revealed contrasting qualities such as respect and flexibility as well as lack of respect and mistrust. The unrecognized relationship theme visualized the patients' relationships with each other and included both supportive and intrusive elements that were probably significant for the outcome of care. The unrecognized relationship contributes with new knowledge about conditions for patients in inpatient care, and indicates that the patients' relationships with each other merit greater attention.

     

     

  • 3.
    Johansson, I. M.
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Skärsäter, I.
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Danielson, Ella
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    The experience of working on a locked acute psychiatric ward2013In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 321-329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study's aim was to elucidate health-care staff experience of working on a locked acute psychiatric ward. In many countries changes in health care has contributed to fewer beds available in inpatient care, and a concentration of patients with severe psychiatric conditions. This implies a changing work environment in acute psychiatric care. Qualitative interviews with health-care staff (n= 10) were carried out on a ward for patients with affective disorder and eating disorder in a Swedish hospital. Qualitative content analysis was used. Four themes were identified from the data: 'undergoing changes in care delivery', 'feeling a need for security and control', 'managing the demands at work' and 'feeling a sense of responsibility'. This study adds to earlier research into how a sense of responsibility can place a significant burden on health-care staff working on a locked psychiatric ward and also contribute to increased control of patients. This study also shows that relationships and power structures among health-care staff need to be addressed when organizational changes are made in care delivery. Further research is needed to reach a comprehensive understanding of care on locked acute psychiatric wards, including a development of nursing and medicine as knowledge domains in one common context. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing.

  • 4.
    Jönsson, P. D.
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Hlth & Care Sci, Vardalinst, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Wijk, H.
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Patient Safety & Qual Improvement, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Danielson, Ella
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Skarsater, I.
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Hlth & Care Sci, Sahlgrenska Acad, Vardalinst, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Outcomes of an educational intervention for the family of a person with bipolar disorder: a 2-year follow-up study2011In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 333-341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to analyse the outcomes of an educational intervention for family members living with a person with bipolar disorder. A longitudinal study was conducted comprising a 10-session educational intervention designed for families with members in outpatient mental health care. Thirty-four family members agreed to participate. Data were collected on five occasions, at baseline and during a 2-year follow-up through self-assessment instruments: the Carers of Older People in Europe Index, the Jalowiec Coping Scale-40, the Sense of Coherence questionnaire and the Social Adaptation Self-evaluation Scale. The results showed that the condition had a considerable negative impact on the family members as carers, but the educational intervention increased their understanding, which facilitated the management of their lives. A significant improvement in stress management was seen over time and social functioning was retained. The study showed that families living with one member with bipolar disorder benefited from the educational intervention in terms of increasing understanding of the condition and reducing stress. Mental health care needs to develop educational interventions further and offer the families support to strengthen their ability to manage with the situation.

  • 5.
    Lilja, Lars
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Hellzén, M
    Lind, I
    Hellzén, Ove
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    The meaning of depression: Swedish nurses' perceptions of depressed inpatients2006In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 269-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People suffering from depressive disorder are affected by one of the western world's largest medical groups of disorders in both psychiatric and general medicine. Drug treatment is usually the first-line intervention and has been shown to be an effective treatment. Other therapies, including nursing interventions that could be implemented in care, are infrequently used. It is therefore important to understand whether nurses' perceptions of depressed people could be explained from the medical model by defining the nurses' view of psychiatric inpatients. Therefore, the aim of this study was, with the clinical picture as the starting point, to investigate the nurses' view of hospitalized patients with a diagnosis of depression. In this prospective study, 155 nurses' opinion of depression among depressive inpatients was assessed using a questionnaire based on the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale. To elucidate the relationship between the variables in the questionnaire, factor analysis rotated by the Varimax method with Kaiser's normalization was used. The factor analysis identified five factors. The number of variables was reduced from 61 to 34. Based on the factor interpretation, an initial factor structure for the depressive inpatient was defined. The identified factors were interpreted and labelled to create the nurses' fused 'picture' or meaning of the depressed inpatient as an individual who experienced feelings of annihilation, alienation, fatigue, emptiness and affliction, an individual who is disconnected from the whole of temporality.

  • 6.
    Pejlert, Anita
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Asplund, Kenneth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Gilje, F
    Norberg, Astrid
    The meaning of caring for patients on a long-term psychiatric ward as narrated by formal care providers1998In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 255-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Seventeen care providers were interviewed about their caring experiences on a hospital psychiatric ward. The interviews focused on the meaning of their work, including the care they provide and the nature of the patient as a person. The study was guided by a phenomenological hermeneutic perspective inspired by Ricoeur (1976). The analysis focused on context and form. Three themes illuminate the meaning of care provided. These themes are as follows; being in the midst of human storage, moving towards a human care of relations, and struggling with 'the old' and 'the new'. Experiencing work as being in the midst of a human storage reflects the historical and human situation of warehousing psychiatric patients. The care providers are experiencing a shift in their view of the patient and the meaning of their work, towards a more human care of relations. For these care providers, there is a struggle between the past, the present and the future. This struggle between 'the old' and 'the new' conveys a struggle between doing as a nurse, which dominates the past, and relating, which is, or needs to be, the current and future focus in psychiatric care. The shift in view distinguished itself by the care providers viewing the patient as being vulnerable and having problems with relations. The results have been interpreted and discussed in the light of a previously published interview study with the patients, carried out at the same time on the same ward. Attending to ingrained attitudes of the past and their influence on new approaches to care is essential to understanding not only changes in ways of doing nursing tasks, but also ways of relating.

     

  • 7.
    Pejlert, Anita
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Asplund, Kenneth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Stories about living in a hospital ward as narrated by schizophrenic patients1995In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 2, no 5, p. 269-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ten schizophrenic patients were interviewed about their own experiences of life in a hospital ward, of their care provider and of the care received. The interview texts were analysed using a phenomenological hermeneutic method. Fatigue, thinking about problems/inner activities, relations and longings for the pre-illness days were themes that occurred in the stories. Seven of the ten interviewees stated that they suffered from fatigue. They were preoccupied with an inner dialogue, trying to solve problems on their own. The patients were alone in their stories. The problems that the patients expressed with regard to relationships arose because they both longed for and feared contact with others, and they felt that they were not 'themselves' when they were with others. For developing care, the importance of learning more about the patients' experiences, especially regarding fatigue, is emphasized.

     

     

  • 8.
    Rönngren, Ylva
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Björk, Annette
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Haage, David
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    Kristiansen, Lisbeth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    LIFEHOPE.EU – Lifestyle & Healthy Outcome in Physical Education: Development of a lifestyle intervention program for people with severe mental illness: Physical activity, dietary changes, and cognitive adaptation training2014In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 21, no 10, p. 924-930Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People with severe mental illness (SMIs) are more prone to physicalillnesses, increased mortality and cognitive impairments, all of whichnegatively influence their daily lives. Physical activity (PHYS)programmes have helped alleviate SMI. LIFEHOPE is an ongoing researchproject with the purpose of developing a sustainable lifestyleintervention for physical and mental health. PHYS/cognitive adaptationtraining (CAT) is a newly created lifestyle intervention that providesgroup education and is based on CAT. It provides individualized supportfor PHYS and dietary change in a natural nursing environment. The aim ofthis study was to obtain further knowledge for developing a sustainablelifestyle programme by exploring psychiatric clients' experiences withPHYS and lifestyle habits, which we did by interviewing a localreference group, community mental healthcare users and community mentalhealthcare workers. Then, we developed a lifestyle programme for peoplewith SMI using information obtained from these focus group interviews.Our results suggest that there is a need for support and education, aswell as active interventions, in carrying out PHYS and dietary changesamong people with SMIs, and the PHYS/CAT may be a useful strategy.

1 - 8 of 8
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