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  • 1.
    Bergmark, Åke
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Lundström, Tommy
    Unitarian ideals and professional diversity in social work practice: the case of Sweden2007In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 55-72Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Blid, Mats
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Normality or care: An inventory of Swedish municipalities’ responses to unstable accommodation for vulnerable groups2008In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 397-413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents an inventory of policies and housing support interventions to the homeless and those at risk of becoming homeless in a representative sample of Swedish municipalities. Two types of intervention are included: various types of accommodation for those who are already homeless and daily life support for those at risk, either provided or financed by the social services in the municipality. Data were collected in 2004-2005 through a questionnaire e-mailed to local authority officials, in a stratified sample of about half of the Swedish municipalities (n=147). The results show that two types of housing intervention dominate the field: daily life support and sublet contracts, both of which have a relatively high normality factor, with a setting in normal housing. Daily life support includes care and is usually implemented before the tenant is evicted. The level of care related to various interventions fluctuates more between the municipalities than normality does. The more densely populated municipalities were more engaged in developing housing policies and administrative bodies to handle these. However, the implementation of housing policies does not seem related to improvements in the qualities of the interventions. On the contrary, the local authorities that have housing policies and administrative tools adapted to these policies provided a lower degree of both normality and care in the interventions. The results suggest that aspects of normality and care in the same type of housing interventions vary depending on the type of municipality, while the existence of policies has no influence on care and a negative effect on the degree of normality provided through the interventions.

  • 3.
    Dellgran, Peter
    et al.
    Department of Social Work, Göteborgs Universitet, .
    Espvall, Majen
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Work. Department of Social Work.
    das Dores Guerreiro, Maria
    CIES-ISCTE, Lisboa, Portugal.
    Mauritti, Rosario
    CIES-ISCTE, Lisboa, Portugal.
    Crowding out, crowding in or just a matter of transformation?: Informal financial support in Portugal and Sweden2012In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 393-411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    This investigation examines the role of informal financial support among university students in two different welfare states, Portugal and Sweden. Using data from a questionnaire (N=525), students´ experiences of receiving loans and gifts, and differences in norms and attitudes toward informal financial support, are explored. The data reveals that the Swedish students receive more financial support in terms of monetary loans and gifts from persons in their social network, while Portuguese students support from their parents to a higher degree is embedded in patterns of living conditions. Furthermore, the interaction processes of exchange of support, for both groups is characterised by reflexivity and complexity, not only framed by resource conditions, but also by relational and situational factors. The results are discussed in the theoretical framework of crowding out/crowding in theories.

  • 4.
    Espvall, Majen
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    From obligations to negotiations: Reciprocity and reflexivity in informal financial support2008In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 355-367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the processes of informal support exchange in wider social network relationships with a particular focus on conditions that are of significance for financial support. The intention, with a point of departure in 24 qualitative interviews with single adults in Sweden, is to present an interactionist model to explain how such support is formed and how it can be analysed and understood. The article shows that such support is by no means purely dependent on financial considerations and resources. The types of relationship and the specific situations where individuals are placed in positions that demand reflection upon, and communication about, their need of support can be likened to a negotiation and are of equal importance. Furthermore, the provision of informal support is also influenced by moral and social norms relating to responsibility, care obligations, self-sufficiency and independence, that are, amongst others things, embedded in our social political system.

  • 5.
    Espvall, Majen
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Dellgran, Peter
    Göteborgs universitet, Institutionen för socialt arbete.
    For better or for worse?: Transformation of social network relations due to long-term illness2016In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 795-813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores whether, and if so how, long-term illness affects and changes personal social relations and how these transformations are related to diagnosis, length of the sick leave, age and gender. It is based on qualitative in-depth interviews (N = 10) and a broader representative survey among long-term ill people (n = 319). The results reveal that illness affects the social relationships in both positive and negative directions. On the one hand, the proximity and mobilization of support from family and friends increases during the period of illness and new relationships are included in the networks. On the other hand, the distance within some relationships increases, and some disappear or become less support-rewarding. While the need for social relationships seems, for the majority, to be essential and constant, the results show that the circle of close personal relationships is shifting and that emotional intensity and reciprocal exchange vary.

  • 6.
    Flem, Aina Lian
    et al.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    Jönsson, Jessica H.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Alseth, Ann Kristin
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    Strauss, Helle
    Institute of Social Work/Metropolitan University College, Denmark.
    Antczak, Helle
    Institute of Social Work/Metropolitan University College, Denmark.
    Revitalizing social work education through global and critical awareness: Examples from three Scandinavian schools of social work2017In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 76-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing globalisation, reorganisation of the Scandinavian welfare regimes and the awareness of increasing global roots of local social problems necessitated change in the curriculum of social work in three Scandinavian schools of social work in Denmark, Norway and Sweden. Recent global transformations, increasing global inequalities, increasing forced migration and the emergence of glocal social problems make the traditional education and methods of social work ineffective and in some cases harmful for people in need of social work intervention. This article examines the need to provide critical, global and multilevel perspectives in social work education in order to prepare social work students for the increasing social problems with global roots. The article, which is based on cross-national collaborations in social work education between three Scandinavian countries, addresses global and critical components in theoretical courses, professional training and field practice in the social work education of the countries in question. It is argued that social work education should move beyond the old division of classical and international/intercultural toward including global and critical perspectives in an integrative manner in all programs.

  • 7.
    Jönsson, Jessica H.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Servants of a 'sinking Titanic' or actors of change?: contested identities of social workers in Sweden2018In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Historically, social workers have been an integral part of a well-developed welfare state in Sweden. However, due to the neoliberal changes, which have seen the weakening of the support system for vulnerable groups and individuals, the traditional ‘solidary role’ of social workers has rapidly altered. This has created uncertainty and dilemmas for the identification of many social workers, who still perceive themselves as promoters of ‘welfare of the people’. This article dwells, therefore, on neoliberal transformations and the changing professional identity of practitioners. The study is based on a comprehensive empirical work of interviews with social workers. The results show a growing and widespread unease with new professional roles and functions of social workers as bureaucrats within a neoliberalised organisation of public social work. Some social workers still try to find creative and new ways of working in solidarity, while others, although critical, see adjustment to the new organisational frames as a way to continue their work. It is argued that social workers are not passive actors in the process of neoliberalisation of public social work in Sweden but could actively take different stances and choose their own identifications, in order to maintain the solidary role of social workers.

  • 8.
    Svärd, Veronica
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Hospital social workers' assessment processes for children at risk: positions in and contributions to inter-professional teams2014In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 508-522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores hospital social workers' assessment processes for children at risk within the context of inter-professional teams working in child hospital care in Sweden. Based on qualitative interviews, the study discusses how assessment processes for children at risk can be understood from a professionalism perspective. Three institutionalized norms-juridical, therapeutic, and medical, building on different knowledge systems-are analyzed in relation to the three positions taken by hospital social workers as team members-active, reflective, or passive-leading to different kinds of actions in the assessment processes. The outlined norms and the positions taken involve consequences for the children and their families, but also pose questions for the future professionalization efforts of hospital social work.

  • 9.
    Wörlén, Marie
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Bergmark, Åke
    Institutionen för socialt arbete, Stockholms universitet.
    Priorities and determinants of priorities of Swedish social workers2012In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 645-663Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Priority setting is an integrated part of social work, in Sweden as well as internationally.In this article we explore Swedish social services and how social workers make priorities and what these priorities involve. By use of regression analysis we also study what circumstances are of importance for allocative precedence and what impact different distributive principles have. One primary result is that priorities are made frequently by social workers mostly on what cases to work with next and how much time to spend on every client. Another somewhat expected result is a manifest area bias, suggesting that respondents tend to see to the interests of their own professional domain. The principle of need proved to be the most important of the distributive principles studied, while principles of capacity to benefit and economy were more endorsed by officials working with elderly and disabled than those in other sectors.

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