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  • 1. Malm Renöfält, Birgitta
    et al.
    Jansson, Roland
    Nilsson, Christer
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Spatial patterns of plant invasiveness in a riparian corridor2005In: Landscape Ecology, ISSN 0921-2973, E-ISSN 1572-9761, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 165-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Analysis of landscape-scale patterns of plant invasiveness can assist in interpreting spatial patterns of plant species richness. We investigated downstream variation in plant invasiveness in the riparian corridor of the free-flowing Vindel River in northern Sweden by introducing seeds of an alien species, Helianthus annuus, in 0.25 m(2) plots of natural vegetation from mountain headwaters to the coast and found a significant downstream pattern with middle reaches having the highest invasiveness. We related invasiveness to species richness, both on a reach scale (200-m long stretches of riverbank encompassing the experimental plots) and on the scale of experimental plots. We found no significant correlation between plant invasiveness and species richness, neither at the reach nor at the plot scale. The number of available soil substrates shows a significant positive quadratic relationship with location along the river and substrate fineness shows a near significant negative quadratic relationship with location along the river, with middle reaches having coarser substrates. Several studies have shown that plant species richness in riparian corridors often exhibits a quadratic pattern with highest species richness in the middle reaches of a river, similar to the pattern we found for invasiveness. Although species richness per se might not be a primary factor for invasibility, the same habitat conditions as those supporting plant species richness, can help in explaining large-scale patterns of plant invasion in riparian zones.

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