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  • 1.
    Ankre, Rosemarie
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Wall Reinius, Sandra
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Methodological Perspectives: The Application of Self-Registration Cards in the Swedish Coasts and Mountains2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 74-80Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Brouder, Patrick
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography. Brock Univ, Dept Geog, St Catharines, ON L2S 3A1, Canada.
    Fullerton, Christopher
    Brock Univ, Dept Geog, St Catharines, ON L2S 3A1, Canada.
    Exploring Heterogeneous Tourism Development Paths: Cascade Effect or Co-evolution in Niagara?2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 15, no 1-2, p. 152-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tourism is often galvanised around a central theme based on a region's strengths in product supply and promotional opportunity, which usually results in an identifiable regional brand. However, this also hides the existing heterogeneity of tourism supply, especially in regions with an established brand. Securing long-term community economic development requires a broader focus since some unheralded tourism development paths may prove resilient over the long term and ultimately contribute to community development. This paper investigates the less central stakeholders in the Niagara region of Canada and explores how future studies might integrate marginal tourism stakeholders in studies of the regional tourism economy. Through semi-structured interviews with regional tourism stakeholders, the analysis of the Niagara region, based on perspectives of co-evolution from evolutionary economic geography, reveals a new perspective on tourism development by focussing on the place of marginal stakeholders in a region with a strong tourism brand. The region exhibits strong path dependence based on its industrial and agricultural legacy but long-term, organic, incremental processes of change within the region are creating new tourism development paths. These new paths co-evolve with the dominant tourism paths as well as other community development initiatives leading to positive change across the region.

  • 3.
    Cetin, Gurel
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography. Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Yarcan, Sukru
    Nisantasi University, Istanbul, Turkey.
    The professional relationship between tour guides and tour operators2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 345-357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tour operators and tour guides are major stakeholders during production and operation of organized package tours. However, the relationship between them received little attention in tourism literature. This study intends to identify the dimensions of the relationship between the two parties and importance attained to different guiding roles both by tour operators and guides. It also explores the attitude gaps between tour operators and guides on various guiding attributes. The analyzed data were collected from 110 professional tour guides and 56 inbound tour operators. Numerous differences in perceptions were identified regarding importance attained to foreign language skills, group cohesion, holiday experience creation, entertainment, representation skills, contract compliance, image creation, itinerary compliance and identification with tour operators.

  • 4.
    Fredman, Peter
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Tyrväinen, Liisa
    Finnish Forest Research Institute.
    Frontiers in Nature-based Tourism: Editorial2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 177-189Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Fredman, Peter
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Wall-Reinius, Sandra
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Grundén, Anna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    The Nature of Nature in Nature-based Tourism.2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 289-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is obvious that nature plays a key role in nature-based tourism. But how important are natural environments for nature-based tourism supply? What kind of natural environments are demanded, and how can or should such environments be accessed? These issues are addressed in this paper using a two-dimensional model of the nature-based tourism servicescape. Based upon a grounded theory mixed-method approach, we analyze to what extent nature-based tourism companies in Sweden depend upon natural environments and facilities (naturalness dimension), and open access and exclusive rights to natural resources (access dimension). Findings show that this sector considers open access much more important than exclusive rights, while naturalness and facilities both represent important attributes. The exception being companies providing extractive activities (e.g. hunting), in particular those with a majority of international customers, where exclusive rights to resources are much more important. This paper provides new knowledge how the nature-based tourism industry can be supported through nature protection, sustainable management of natural resources, public infrastructure and access policies.

  • 6.
    Fredman, Peter
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Yuan, Mike
    Lakehead university, Canada.
    Primary Economic Impacts at Three Spatial Levels: The Case of Fulufjället National Park, Sweden2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 11, no Suppl 1, p. 74-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The changing nature of Swedish national parks from a primarily resource protection emphasis to a more multiple use philosophy, including tourism, requires new ways of looking at park-related planning and development. Tourism must not be considered in a vacuum spatially but from a broad regional perspective as its economic impact is greater than just that which occurs in or adjacent to a park. The aim of this study was to analyze primary economic impacts (expenditures) at three different spatial levels (in the park, the gateway communities, and the region outside these gateway communities) associated with tourism to Fulufjället National Park in Sweden. Results show that park visitors do have significant economic expenditures beyond the national park and nearby gateway communities. The probability of expenditures, and the magnitude of those expenditures, increases with a wider geographical scale of analysis. These observations illustrate the importance of examining national park tourism from a wider spatial perspective and to ensure a diversity of opportunities are available outside the park that will complement the activities inside the park.

  • 7.
    Garms, Mareike
    et al.
    Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, Applied Geography and Environmental Planning Research Group, Oldenburg, Germany.
    Fredman, Peter
    Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway.
    Mose, Ingo
    Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, Applied Geography and Environmental Planning Research Group, Oldenburg, Germany.
    Travel Motives of German Tourists in the Scandinavian Mountains: the Case of Fulufjället National Park2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 239-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the travel motives of German visitors to Fulufjället National Park (FNP). The park attracts more than one-third international visitors, which is a high proportion compared to other regions in the Scandinavian mountains. Data for this study were derived from a mixed-method approach including a visitor survey and on-site interviews conducted in summer 2014. Factor and reliability analysis revealed, along with the usage of recreational experience preference scales, five motivational factors with an appropriate internal consistency including focus on self, nature, freedom, others, and experiences. As a result, the self-related and socialness factors play a subordinate role within the travel decision of German visitors. Instead, it is the outstanding scenery of FNP that provides German visitors with rewarding experiences in the Scandinavian “wilderness”. Results from the study are discussed with respect to national park management and business development.

  • 8.
    Ioannides, Dimitri
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Book review: Collaborative economy and tourism: perspectives, politics, policies and prospects2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 18, p. S105-S107Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Kronenberg, Kai
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Fuchs, Matthias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Salman, Khalik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Business, Economics and Law.
    Lexhagen, Maria
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Höpken, Wolfram
    Business Informatics Group, University of Applied Sciences Ravensburg-Weingarten, Doggenried Str., DE-88250 Weingarten, Germany .
    Economic effects of advertising expenditures – a Swedish destination study of international tourists2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 352-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study estimates the effects of advertising on internationaltourism demand for the leading Swedish mountain destination Åre. In contrast to previous studies, which primarily focus ontourism demand at a national or sectorial level, this research isconducted at the destination level. The study considers pricelevels at tourism destinations and tourists’ income asdeterminants for tourism demand. However, following advertisingtheories and previous research, the dominance of the marketpower function (i.e. product differentiation) and the informationfunction (i.e. market transparency) are identified as major codeterminantsfor international tourism demand. Demand elasticitycoefficients are empirically estimated for the origin countriesNorway, Finland, the Russian Federation, Denmark and the UK.Findings show that advertising is a significant driver of tourismdemand from Norway, the UK and Russia. Interestingly, incomeand tourism price levels are less significant drivers of demand inall analysed origin markets.

  • 10.
    Lexhagen, Maria
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Nysveen, Herbjørn
    An Update on Swedish and Norwegian Tourism Websites: The Importance of Reservation Services and Value-added Services2001In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 150-154Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Lundberg, Christine
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Critical service encounters in hotel restaurants: The personnel's perspective2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores frontline hotel restaurant workers' experiences of critical service encounters by employing the Five Aspects Meal Model (FAMM) as a frame of reference. The questions raised in this study were: Which satisfactory and dissatisfactory incidents can be found in the different aspects of the restaurant experience according to employees? How can they be categorised under these aspects? A critical incident technique was employed to collect experiences of critical service encounters together with projective techniques. The findings of the study suggest that frontline workers experience critical service encounters related to four (Room, Meeting, Product, Management Control System) out of the five aspects of FAMM. Only a limited number of incidents were found in the Room aspect compared to the other three aspects. The largest proportions of incidents were found in Meeting and Product aspects of the meal experience. This insight may guide management of restaurants when making decisions in, for example, the recruitment, information and training of workers, the development of products and suitable management control systems as well as design of physical surroundings. Earlier research has explored the meal experience from a management as well as customer perspective. In this study, employees' experiences are in focus, which constitute the main research contribution of the study. © 2011 Taylor & Francis.

  • 12.
    Margaryan, Lusine
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Fredman, Peter
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Natural amenities and the regional distribution of nature-based tourism supply in Sweden2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 145-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nature-based tourism is often perceived as one of the easiest and readily-available tools for regional development and diversification of rural economies, and Sweden is not an exception. Successful tourism development, however, depends on various amenities, which vary with region. This article, based on a national survey among nature-based tourism service providers in Sweden, discusses general characteristic of Swedish nature-based tourism supply, reveals the most important natural amenities from the supply perspective and discusses the patterns of their regional variation. It is further investigated how distributions of various amenities is related to the density of nature-based tourism operations across regions. The scope of the analysis includes three levels: country, land and county. Results show that nature-based tourism in Sweden is a highly diversified sector, which demonstrates significant north-south variations, visible on the level of the three lands. On the level of counties, natural and human-made amenities are comparable in their power to predict distribution of NBT operations, suggesting that the border between NBT and other forms of tourism is not as distinct as is often imagined.

  • 13.
    Nordvall, Anders
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Tourism Studies and Geography.
    Organizing Periodic Events: A Case Study of a Failed Christmas Market2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 442-460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Periodic events are under constant threat of failure yet research onevent failure is limited – even if often highlighted as a researchpriority. The destination management organization in themountain resort of Åre sought to establish a new ChristmasMarket to increase the number of visitors in the winter pre-seasonbut the event was not a success and the destination failed in itsambition to establish a periodic event. The Market was studiedduring its first three years using action research, interviews anddirect observation and provided insights into the organization ofperiodic events. In order to understand the failure of the Market,empirical data were analyzed using concepts related to twodiscrete organizational types: permanent and temporary. Theresults show that the failure in Åre cannot be explained throughthe use of a single conceptual model, but can be understoodwhen both models are utilized. The conclusion is that periodicevents can be understood as phenomena that are characterizedby permanent as well as temporary organization.

  • 14.
    Pettersson, Robert
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Getz, Donald
    Event experiences in time and space: a study of the visitors to the 2007 world alpine ski championships in Åre, Sweden2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 9, no 2-3, p. 308-326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The spatial and temporal nature of event experiences was studied through interviews, participant observation and photography at a major sporting event. Results contribute to better understanding of how visitors interact with the event setting and with each other, and help build theory on experiences, their design and management. Event tourists were observed spatially and temporally while enjoying various elements of the host village and four event arenas, while photographs and notes made by participant observers enabled a more focused evaluation of positive and negative experiences. Results identified the importance of social factors, as visitors wanted to be where the others were, revealed that surprise created positive experiences, and identified the existence of experiential “hot spots” defined in both time and space. It is concluded that positive experiences are more important than negative ones in terms of overall satisfaction. Implications are drawn regarding the nature of event experiences, their design and management, and on related methodological development.

  • 15.
    Raadik, Jana
    et al.
    Colorado State Univ, Ft Collins, CO 80523 USA.
    Cottrell, Stuart P.
    Colorado State Univ, Ft Collins, CO 80523 USA.
    Fredman, Peter
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Ritter, Paul
    Colorado State Univ, Ft Collins, CO 80523 USA.
    Newman, Peter
    Colorado State Univ, Ft Collins, CO 80523 USA.
    Understanding Recreational Experience Preferences: Application at Fulufjallet National Park, Sweden2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 231-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the recreational experience preferences (REP) of visitors to Fulufjallet National Park, Sweden. Data were derived from a pilot study conducted in the summer of 2005 by Colorado State University on behalf of the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency and the European Tourism Research Institute. A total of 107 Swedish and international visitors were surveyed on-site. Analysis included reliability and exploratory factor analyses to investigate the motivational aspects of visitors to Fulufjallet National Park. Aims were to examine motivations of visitors in a Northern European national park using REP items from a North American context and to examine REP's potential for cross-cultural use. Four primary REP dimensions were identified including self-discovery, experience of places, seeking solitude and challenging self. Implications for management and the Scandinavian context are given along with the cultural context of allemansratten and friluftsliv.

  • 16.
    Salman, Khalik
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Arnesson, Leif
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Sörensson, Anna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Shukur, G
    Department of Economics and Statistics, Jönköping University, Centre of Labour Market Policy Research (CAFO), Linnaeus University, Växjö University, Sweden.
    Estimating international tourism demand for selected regions in Sweden and Norway with iterative seemingly unrelated regressions (ISUR)2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 395-410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper estimates the demand for tourism to Sweden and Norway from five countries: Denmark, the United Kingdom, Switzerland, Japan, and the United States. For each visiting country, and for selected regions in Sweden and Norway, we specify separate equations by including relative information. We then estimate these equations using Zellner's Iterative Seemingly Unrelated Regressions (ISUR). The benefit of this model is that the ISUR estimators utilize the information present in the error correlation of the cross regressions (or equations) and hence are more efficient than single equation estimation methods such as ordinary least squares. Monthly time series data from January 1993 to December 2006 are used. The results show that the consumer price index, some lagged dependent variables, and several monthly dummies (representing seasonal effects) have a significant impact on the number of visitors to the SW6 region in Sweden and Tröndelag in Norway. We also find that, in at least some cases, relative prices and exchange rates have a significant effect on international tourism demand.

  • 17.
    Sandell, K.
    et al.
    Geography and Tourism, Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Fredman, Peter
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    The right of public access - opportunity or obstacle for nature tourism in Sweden?2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 291-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Access to countryside areas - by means of personal ownership, designated areas or free access - is fundamental to outdoor recreation and nature tourism. This paper examines the role of the Right of Public Access for public participation in outdoor recreation and nature tourism supply in Sweden. This right can be seen both as a "free space" for recreation and a way of restricting land ownership. Our study shows that the Right of Public Access has strong support among the Swedish public in general and that designated areas for recreation are less important than public access for outdoor recreation participation. Among nature tourism entrepreneurs, the Right of Public Access is considered a success factor to a much higher extent than an obstacle. We identify a tension between the general public and nature tourism entrepreneurs with respect to traditional backcountry activities such as hiking, cross-country skiing and nature studies. One important challenge for the future will be to balance the demand for outdoor recreation with nature tourism opportunities for local economic development, and the paper concludes with a set of topics suggested for further discussion concerning the Right of Public Access in a dynamic world. © 2010 Taylor & Francis.

  • 18.
    Wall Reinius, Sandra
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Bäck, Lennart
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Changes in Visitor Demand: Interyear Comparisons of Swedish Hikers' Characteristics, Preferences and Experiences2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 11, no Suppl 1, p. 38-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this study is a comparison over time between two visitor surveys

    (1980 and 2003) conducted in northern Sweden. The aim is to analyze possible changes and

    similarities over time in what attracts hikers to visit protected areas and if the type of visitor

    has changed. Since comparisons over time are rare in tourism and outdoor recreation

    research, this paper contributes to valuable empirical insights. Long-term data on tourism

    and recreation is essential to assess visitor experiences and visitor impacts on the resource,

    and for nature conservation management. The results reveal several variables that have been

    stable over time. However, many changes have also occurred. For the visitors, it has become

    more important with adventure and perils, services, marked hiking trails and accessibility,

    and the average age among the hikers has become higher and they have reduced their length

    of stay. In the second study, the hikers also accepted infrastructure to a greater extent. The

    paper discusses possible implications of the changes found.

  • 19.
    Wolf-Watz, Daniel
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Sandell, Klas
    Karlstads universitet, Sweden.
    Fredman, Peter
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Environmentalism and Tourism Preferences. A Study of Outdoor Recreationalists in Sweden2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 190-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the linkages between nature-based recreation and preferences of individuals classified as “environmentalists”. Following an overview of the literature, this paper reports on an empirical investigation of the nature-based recreation vs. environmentalism nexus using data from a national Swedish survey. Study findings show that environmentalists (environmentally-oriented individuals) behave differently in terms of their recreation-related preferences when compared to non-environmentalists. Environmentalists prefer outdoor activities with little or no impact on the environment as demonstrated, for example, by their avoidance of extractive (e.g. hunting) and motorized activities (e.g. snowmobiling). Despite these differences, the findings were inconsistent in that while environmentalists avoid some extractive and motorized activities, other similar activities were not avoided. Thus, the results question the use of simplistic recreational classification systems for the understanding of activity preferences and the authors call for more in-depth, qualitative research to further understand the nature-based recreation choices of environmentalists. Study findings also show that environmentally-oriented individuals do not hesitate to travel away from residential areas for participation in nature-based recreation. Therefore, this paper helps us to understand which nature-based activities environmentalists demand and can provide a more informed basis for tourism planning and management.

  • 20.
    Yachin, Jonathan Moshe
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Economics, Geography, Law and Tourism. Dalarna University.
    The entrepreneur–opportunity nexus: discovering the forces that promote product innovations in rural micro-tourism firms2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 47-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to investigate what sets in motion the process that results in product innovations in rural micro-tourism firms. The point of departure is to place entrepreneurship as a process that precedes innovations. This approach enables the application of the opportunity-based perspective, on the study of 40 new tourism products. Data were collected through in-depth interviews with owner-managers of micro-tourism firms in rural Sweden. The focus of the analysis is on the formation of the entrepreneur–opportunity nexus. The findings suggest that in forming the nexus, three types of forces are at play: internal, supply chain dynamics and reaction to changes. The notion of triggering forces adds a new dimension to the study of entrepreneurial opportunities. The theoretical contribution of this paper to tourism research is twofold. First, it points at the generating moment as a step towards theorising innovations, and second, the findings contribute to the growing knowledge base about entrepreneurial behaviour in micro-tourism firms in rural areas. Finally, in a practical manner, the findings of this study should encourage tourism entrepreneurs to invest in exploring the value chain, regard tourists as sources of knowledge and be attentive to changes in circumstances.

  • 21.
    Zillinger, Malin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    The importance of guidebooks for the choice of tourist sites: a study of German tourists in Sweden.2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 229-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Guidebooks contain important sources of information for travellers. It can be assumed that they influence the reader's choice of tourist sites, as a selection of tourist attractions is presented in the books. In this study, the influence of guidebooks on German tourists' choice of tourist sites in Sweden was examined. Nine guidebooks were analysed. In order to analyse the relationship between the presentation in the guidebooks and tourist journeys to these places, a comparison between presented tourist sites and accommodation statistics (for the year 2002) was accomplished. Further, the content of the presented tourist regions was analysed. The results indicate that the distance from home affects how strongly tourists are influenced by guidebooks. In addition, it was found that individually created tourist regions are regularly used in guidebooks and that a stereotype picture of these tourist regions is provided.

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