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  • 1.
    Abbasian, Saeid
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Hellgren, Carina
    International Programme Office.
    Working Conditions for Female and Immigrant Cleaners in Stockholm County: An Intersectional Approach2012In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, ISSN 2245-0157, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 161-181Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Bolin, Malin
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Olofsdotter, Gunilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Bringing Organizations Back in: Going from Healthy Work to Healthy Workplaces2019In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, ISSN 2245-0157, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 3-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to discuss how the concept of inequality regimes can contribute to theoretical and methodological advances in occupational health research. We posit the mutual advantages of bringing together feminist intersectional analysis of inequality in working life with studies of working conditions and health. The job demands and control model (JDC) is used as a starting point for the discussion. Reintegration of organizational analysis into studies of working conditions and health is warranted, as organizations influence how working conditions are distributed and individuals are stratified in the labor market. We refer to that development as going from healthy work to healthy workplaces. We discuss how the concept of inequality regimes is open for mixed method analysis and how it can be used as a theoretical framework for unraveling the ways in which inequalities in working conditions and health are (re)created in different types of organizations.

  • 3.
    Granberg, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Manufacturing dissent: Labor conflict, care work, and the politicization of caring2014In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, ISSN 2245-0157, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 139-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article analyzes the phenomenon of "politicization of caring," observed in studies of nurselabor conflict, in the context of a small-scale episode of conflict at a Swedish hospital ward. Usinganalytical concepts drawn from work on the role of images of gendered ideal workers in managementcultivation of consent, and the method of positioning analysis, it tries to identify the littleresearched discursive practices involved in the politicization of caring. Analysis of interviews withregistered nurses, who took part in a conflict where some of them threatened to resign unlesswages were raised and working conditions improved, shows a range of such strategies: includingproblematizing identities in nursing, expanding the context of caring work, using a discourse of professionalism,and redefining the interpellated image of nursing. Findings indicate that politicizationthus has important effects on the gendering of nursing and the viability of neoliberal restructuringof healthcare work.

  • 4.
    Granberg, Magnus
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Shop floor power: Opportunity and collectivism in nurses' collective resignations2017In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, ISSN 2245-0157, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 109-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This historical and comparative study attends to the phenomenon of collective resignation by registered nurses in the Swedish health services, with the aim of exploring the existence and utilization of shop floor power. The study uses two kinds of data: incidences of collective resignation since the 1980s are explored using newspaper data; second, two cases of collective resignation are comparatively explored using interview data. First is analyzed how contemporary opportunities to take this form of worker action arose. Then is analyzed how differences between the two cases shed further light on opportunity structures in different contexts of nursing, and on nurses' ability to organize the resignation threat as a collective act. The study clarifies the existence of nurses' shop floor power as it relates to opportunity structures, while also pointing to the significance of the extent of collectivism when nurses challenge employers by threatening this kind of industrial action.

  • 5.
    Olofsdotter, Gunilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    The Staircase Model - labour control of temporary agency workers in a Swedish call center2012In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, ISSN 2245-0157, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 41-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article explores the labor control practices implemented in a call center with extensive contracting of temporary agency workers (TAWs). More specifically, the article focuses on how structural and ideological power works in this setting and on the effects of this control for TAWs’ working conditions. Open-ended, semi-structured interviews were conducted with TAWs, regular employees, and a manager in a call center specializing in telecommunication services in Sweden. The results show that ideological power is important in adapting the interests of TAWs to correspond with those of temporary work agencies (TWAs) and their client companies, in this case the call center. The results also show how ideological power is mixed with structural control in terms of technologicalcontrol systems and, most importantly, a systematic categorization of workers in a hierarchical structure according to their value to the call center. By systemically categorizing workers in the staircase model, a structural inequality is produced and reproduced in the call center. The motives for working in the call center are often involuntary and are caused by the shortage of work other than a career in support services. As a consequence, feelings of insecurity and an awareness of the precarious nature of their assignment motivate TAWs to enhance their performance and hopefully take a step up on the staircase. This implies new understandings of work where job insecurity has become a normal part of working life.

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