miun.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 18 of 18
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Bergelin, A.
    et al.
    van Hees, P. A. W.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Wahlberg, O.
    Department of Chemistry, Royal Institute of Technology, .
    Lundström, Ulla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    The acid-base properties of high and low molecular weight organic acids in soil solutions of podzolic soils2000In: Geoderma, ISSN 0016-7061, E-ISSN 1872-6259, Vol. 94, no 2-4, p. 223-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The acid properties of the organic acids and identified low molecular weight (LMW) organic acids in soil solutions of podzolic soils were determined using proton affinity spectra, based on EMF titration data, and Gran titrations. The proton affinity spectra showed apparent pKa values of 2.6, 4.1, 5.4 and 6.7 for the dissolved organic material. The LMW organic acids had similar pKa values. The average specific buffer capacity as determined by Gran titrations was 8.8±0.5 μmol H+/mg DOC. The specific buffer capacity for the identified low molecular acids was 40±2 μmol H+/mg DOC.

  • 2. Giesler, R.
    et al.
    Ilvesniemi, H.
    Nyberg, L.
    van Hees, P. A. W.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Starr, M.
    Bishop, K.
    Kareinen, T.
    Lundström, Ulla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Distribution and mobilization of Al, Fe and Si in three podzolic soil profiles in relation to the humus layer.2000In: Geoderma, ISSN 0016-7061, E-ISSN 1872-6259, Vol. 94, no 2-4, p. 249-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mobilization of Al, Fe and Si in podzols is often associated with the weathering of silicate minerals in the E horizon, downward migration, and their accumulation lower in the soil profile. This study investigated Al, Fe, and Si concentrations in soil water (centrifugation samples) and estimated leaching losses from the humus layer in comparison with those in the mineral E and B horizon. Concentrations of total soluble Al and Fe in soil water were higher in the O and E horizons than in B horizon samples, but not significantly different between the two uppermost horizons. Si concentrations were higher in the E than in the O horizon. The amount of Al and Fe leaching from the E horizon (i.e. input to the B horizon) compared to amount leaching from the O horizon (i.e. the input to the E horizon) ranged from 92% to 163%. Calculated leaching losses from the lower B horizon were less than 3% of the input to the B horizon. The results suggest that a large part of the illuviated Al and Fe in the Bs horizon is derived from the O horizon. Similar values for the Si ranged from 56% to 61% (comparing E horizon output with E horizon input). Budget estimates available for one of the investigated podzols indicated that biocycling via above-ground litter explained < 12% of the estimated annual input of Al and Fe to the forest floor. Inputs of Al and Fe due to upward flow of capillary water accounted for about 26% of the Al and Fe in the O layer. The results show that there is a considerable pool of Si Al, Fe in the humus layer. This pool plays an important part in the present day biogeochemical cycling of these elements in podzolic soils. Several mechanisms possibly involved in the transfer of Al, Fe and Si from the mineral soil to the humus layer are discussed.

  • 3. Gustafsson, Jon Petter
    et al.
    van Hees, Patrick
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Starr, Michael
    Karltun, Erik
    Lundström, Ulla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Partitioning of base cations and sulphate between solid and dissolved phases in three podzolized forest soils2000In: Geoderma, ISSN 0016-7061, E-ISSN 1872-6259, Vol. 94, no 2-4, p. 311-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cation and SO4 adsorption properties of O and B horizons of three podzolised soils in Sweden and Finland were studied through analysing the soil solution at six different sampling occasions and through a set of batch experiments. High concentrations of dissolved organic carbon and cations were found in centrifuged soil solutions from the O horizon, especially during autumn. An analysis using the WHAM-S model suggested that most of the dissolved Ca, Mg, K and Mn were counter-ions, residing in the diffuse layers of dissolved fulvic acids. Hence, the solubility of these cations depended on the solubility of organic matter. Model exercises suggested that the solubility of humics in turn was influenced by seasonal differences in hydrophobicity and by the water content. Furthermore, the model results showed that only a low proportion of the B horizon organic matter was involved in calcium binding. This is probably due to the interaction between organic matter and oxide surfaces in this horizon. In the case of sulphate adsorption in the B horizons, a surface complexation model was tested for its ability to describe batch experiment data and temporal differences in soil water chemistry. This model was based on the diffuse-layer model and it was optimised by adjusting the surface site concentration and the point of zero charge. However, the interaction between Ca2+ and SO4/2- could not be modelled. Comparisons between the model and the field observations proved to be difficult due to a considerable soil heterogeneity. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  • 4. Haslinger, E.
    et al.
    Ottner, F.
    Lundström, Ulla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Pedogenesis in the Alno carbonatite complex, Sweden2007In: Geoderma, ISSN 0016-7061, E-ISSN 1872-6259, Vol. 142, no 1-2, p. 127-135Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Holmström, Sara
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    van Hees, Patrick
    Lundström, Ulla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Modelling of aluminium chemistry in soil solution of acidified and lime treated podzolic soil2004In: Geoderma, ISSN 0016-7061, E-ISSN 1872-6259, Vol. 127, no 3-4, p. 280-292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Soil solutions were taken from untreated and lime treated Norway spruce sites in the south of Sweden. At the limed sites 3.45 t ha−1 (L) or 8.75 t ha−1 (H) dolomite were applied 15 years before sampling. The mean concentration of inorganic Al (AlQR) in the untreated control plots (C) was 37 μM and the concentration of AlQR decreased when the dosages of dolomite treatments increased. For the H plots, with high doses of dolomite treatment the mean concentration of AlQR was 17 μM. The total Al (Altot) also decreased by dolomite treatment, from 72 μM to 56 μM. Propionate (7–268 μM) and malonate (2–34 μM) were the low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) found in the highest concentrations at Hasslöv. The differences in concentration of most of the determined LMWOAs were significantly increased due to treatment. The citrate average concentration for the different plots varied between 2.8 μM and 5.1 μM and the concentration of oxalate had concentrations between 1.7 μM and 2.6 μM. The experimental concentration of Al bound to LMWOAs obtained by ultrafiltration (<1000 Da) of the soil solution was in the mor layer on average 12% for the C plot and the L plots and 4% in the H plots. In the AE horizon the figures were 15% for the C plot and about 7% for the treated L and H plots, and in the Bhs horizon 9% for both the C, L and H plots. Two chemical equilibrium models were evaluated: Winderemere Humic Aqueous Model (WHAM) and a model treating the high molecular weight organic acids as monoprotic. The concentrations of inorganic Al, Al bound to identified LMWOAs and high molecular weights acids in soil solution (mor, AE and Bhs) from untreated and lime treated soil were calculated. The modelled inorganic Al values of the control plot were similar to the concentrations found in the soil solution (AlQR). For the dolomite treated plots the concentration of AlQR (0–40 μM) was higher in soil solution than that modelled by WHAM and the monoprotic model. The experimental concentration of Al bound to LMWOAs obtained by ultrafiltration (<1000 Da) of the soil solution was comparable but always higher than the modelled values. The modelling confirms that an appreciable part of the Al is strongly complexed with LMWOAs in the organic and eluvial horizons of the podzolized soil, suggesting that LMWOAs are efficient weathering agents and important for the formation of the eluvial horizon in podzols. Saturation indices (SI) for two solid Al phases were also calculated, including crystalline gibbsite and proto-imogolite (PI). The SIs for both the C and the treated plots (L and H) showed very broad ranges for the different horizons investigated, indicating undersaturation as well as oversaturation with respect to gibbsite and proto-imogolite.

  • 6. Ilvesniemi, H.
    et al.
    Giesler, R.
    van Hees, Patrick
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Magnussson, T.
    Melkerud, P. A.
    General description of the sampling techniques and the sites investigated in the Fennoscandinavian podzolization project2000In: Geoderma, ISSN 0016-7061, E-ISSN 1872-6259, Vol. 94, no 2-4, p. 109-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A 3-year project focusing on the fundamental processes of podzolization was carried out on three sampling sites in northern Fennoscandinavia. The soils were selected based on the previous information of the soil properties to represent typical soils in the area. In this article, the post-glacial history of the sites, site vegetation and general properties of the soils, as well as the methods used are presented. Two of the sites were classified as Typic HapLocryods and one as an Entic Haplocryod. The post-glacial age of the sites was between 9000 and 9500 years BP and the parent material was glacial till in one of the sites and glaciofluvial material in two of them. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 7.
    Nambu, Kei
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    van Hees, P. A. W.
    Essén, Sofia
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Lundström, Ulla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Assessing centrifugation technique for obtaining soil solution with respect to leaching of low molecular mass organic acids from pine roots.2005In: Geoderma, ISSN 0016-7061, E-ISSN 1872-6259, Vol. 127, no 3-4, p. 263-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Centrifugation is a common technique to obtain soil solution. However, this method may disrupt living cells in the soil and release their contents into the soil solution. To examine this possibility, we compared leaching of low molecular mass organic acids (LMMOAs) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from the root of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) packed in quartz sand via extraction by centrifugation and milder procedures of water immersion and suction. Centrifugation enhanced leaching of shikimate appreciably; leaching of DOC, lactate, malate, and phosphate was also significantly enhanced. The concentration leached from the root was greater than 10 mu M for shikimate, and generally ranged between 0.5 and 5 mu M for the other acids. As for actual soil samples, this level of leaching could be appreciably large in upper mineral horizon(s) if the root density is as large as in our experiments and if the concentrations of LMMOAs in the soil matrix are relatively small.

  • 8.
    Nambu, Kei
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    van Hees, P A W
    Jones, D L
    Vinogradoff, S
    Lundström, Ulla S
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Composition of organic solutes and respiration in soils derived from alkaline and non-alkaline parent materials2008In: Geoderma, ISSN 0016-7061, E-ISSN 1872-6259, Vol. 144, no 3-4, p. 468-477Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parent material greatly influences pedogenesis and soil nutrient availability and consequently we hypothesized that it would significantly affect the amount of organic solutes in soil, many of which have been implicated in rhizosphere processes linked to plant nutrient uptake. Consequently, we investigated the influence of two contrasting parent materials in which calcite was present or absent (alkaline and non-alkaline soils) on the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), low-molecular weight organic acids (LMWOA) and glucose in soil solution. Both soils were under Norway spruce. The dynamics of LMWOAs in soil were also investigated using 14C-labelled citrate and oxalate. Some of the mineral horizons of the alkaline soils showed significantly higher concentrations of DOC, phenolics, and fumarate in soil solution and also a higher basal respiration. No major differences were seen in organic solute status in the organic horizons of the two soil types. LMWOAs were present at low concentrations in soil solution (< 1 to 25 µM). Their mineralization rate significantly decreased with soil depth, however, overall neither their concentration or half-life in soil was markedly affected by parent material. The alkaline soils had significantly higher CO2-to-soil organic C (SOC) ratios, and consequently SOC in the alkaline soils did not seem more chemically stable against mineralization. Considering possible DOC and CO2 efflux rates it was suggested that the equal or larger SOC stocks in alkaline mineral soils were most likely linked to a higher net primary productivity. In conclusion, our study found that parent material exerted only a small effect on the concentration and dynamics of organic solutes in soil solution. This suggests that in comparison to other factors (e.g. vegetation cover, climate etc) parent material may not be a major regulator of the organic solute pool in soil.

  • 9.
    Norström, Sara H
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of applied science and design.
    Bylund, Dan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of applied science and design.
    Vestin, Jenny L. K.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of applied science and design.
    Lundström, Ulla S
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of applied science and design.
    Initial effects of wood ash application to soil and soil solution chemistry in a small, boreal watershed2012In: Geoderma, ISSN 0016-7061, E-ISSN 1872-6259, Vol. 187, p. 85-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the conception that whole tree harvesting leads to an impoverishment of forest soils wood ash application is recommended, with the foremost benefits being increased pH in soil and subsequent surface waters, and recycling of nutrients from the wood ash.

    In this investigation a small boreal catchment in central Sweden was studied for two years before and two years after treatment with the maximum recommended dose, 3 tonnes/ha, of crushed, self-hardened wood ash. The sampling area was situated in a slope towards a stream, to include the effect on both recharge- and discharge areas with different soil constitutions. The soil solution chemistry, exchangeable pool of cations and potential heavy metal accumulation in berries were studied. Temporary increases in soil solution concentration were found for K in the recharge area and Ca and SO4 in the discharge area when comparing ashed and control areas. No change in exchangeable cations was observed during the study period, and no increase of heavy metals in bilberries did occur. These small changes in the constitution of the soil solution do not suggest wood ash application as a method to improve soil quality in an initial phase.

  • 10.
    Olofsson, Madelen
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Norström, Sara
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Bylund, Dan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Evaluation of sampling and sample preparation procedures for the determination of aromatic acids and their distribution in a podzol soil using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry2014In: Geoderma, ISSN 0016-7061, E-ISSN 1872-6259, Vol. 232-234, p. 373-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work the distribution of free and weekly adsorbed aromatic acids (phthalic acid and ten phenolicacids; gallic, p-hydroxybenzoic, salicylic, vanillic, protocatechuic, p-coumaric, syringic, sinapic, ferulic and caffeicacid), which could participate in weathering and soil formation processes, were studied for O, E and Bhorizons in a podzol soil in central Sweden. For the analysis a simple and rapid quantitative and qualitative liquidchromatography–tandem mass spectrometry method (using gradient elution) was developed with LODs rangingfrom 5 to 25 nM. Different soil solution sampling techniques (tension-lysimeter and soil centrifugation) and soilextraction with either 10 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.2) or 50:50 (v/v) 10 mM phosphate buffer:MeOHwere compared. All eleven acids were found in detectable or trace concentrations. The most abundant aromaticacids were vanillic and phthalic acid with concentrations around 1 μM for O and E horizon respectively.Lysimeter samples resulted in the lowest concentrations followed by centrifugation samples. Ingeneral, buffer:MeOH extraction resulted in the highest concentrations for the O horizon, likely due toMeOH's ability to compete for hydrophobic sites on soil organic matter (SOM). Then again, pure bufferwith its higher ion strength, interfering with the acids electrostatic interactions with clay particles, leads tohigher extracted concentrations for the E and B horizons. Since the efficiency of the extraction solutions, to alarge extent, depends on the sample properties, a general approach is hard to appoint. However, the extractionof substituted cinnamic acids is in general facilitated by adding MeOH to the extraction solution. The use of statisticalmethods for the evaluation of the results showed a large and significant difference in aromatic acid concentrationsreceived using different sampling techniques and sample preparations. In fact, sampling methodsresulted in higher variations in aromatic acid concentrations than sampled horizon.

  • 11. van Breemen, Nico
    et al.
    Lundström, Ulla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Jongmans, Antoine
    Do plants drive podzolization via rock-eating mycorrizhal fungi?2000In: Geoderma, ISSN 0016-7061, E-ISSN 1872-6259, Vol. 94, no 2-4, p. 163-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Weathering and supply of nutrients derived from minerals to plants is known to be stimulated by plant symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi. Nutrients are generally thought to pass the bulk soil solution before plant uptake. Jongmans et al. [Jongmans, A.G., van Breemen, N., Lundstrom, U.S., van Hees, P.A.W., Finlay, R.D., Srinivasan M., Unestam, T., Giesler, R., Melkerud, P.-A., Olsson, M., 1997. Rock-eating fungi. Nature, 389, 682-683] showed that (ectomycorrhizal) fungi drill innumerable narrow cylindrical pores (diameter 3-10 μm) into weatherable minerals in podzol E horizons. The fungi probably form micropores by exuding strongly complexing low-molecular weight organic acids at their hyphal tips, causing highly local dissolution of Al silicates. Micropores occurred in all thin sections of podzols under Pinus sylvestris and Picea abies available from Sweden (3), Finland (2), Switzerland (2), Denmark (2) and the Netherlands (3), but not in the few available thin sections of non-podzolic soils under broadleaves. Many weatherable minerals in the podzol E horizon appeared to be perforated, as opposed to few if any in the abruptly underlying B horizon, suggesting a link to podzolization. High concentrations of Al and Si in organic surface horizons under boreal and temperate conifers can be explained by transfer by hypha of weathering products from the minerals to mycorrhizal roots in the O horizon, followed by release of weathering products that are not taken up by the plants. Rock-eating ectomycorrhizal fungi suggest a more direct role for plants in podzolization than hitherto realized, providing tight coupling between podzolization and mineral weathering. Preliminary observations, however, indicate that mycorrhizal fungi do not play a role in podzolization under Kauri (Agathis australis) in New Zealand. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  • 12.
    van Hees, P. A. W.
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Lundström, Ulla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Equilibrium models of aluminium and iron complexation with different organic acids in soil solution2000In: Geoderma, ISSN 0016-7061, E-ISSN 1872-6259, Vol. 94, no 2-4, p. 201-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The percentage of Al and Fe bound to identified low molecular weight (LMW) organic acids and phosphate in soil solution was calculated using a chemical equilibrium model. The highest fractions were obtained for the O1 horizon solutions with median values between 38-49% for Al and 18-29% for Fe. Generally the percentage declined in the deeper horizons. Acceptable agreement with experimental values using ultrafiltration (< 1000 D) was found especially for the spring and summer samplings. In the autumn samples, larger deviations between the modelled and ultrafiltered fractions were found. The major part of the remaining Al and Fe in solution was calculated to be bound to undefined organic acids most likely of higher molecular weight. Speciation studies of some individual organic acids are presented. Citric acid proved to be the most important complex former of the LMW acids in the O and E horizons while oxalic acid was dominant in the B horizon solutions. The total level of organic complexation of Al, Fe, Ca and Mg was also studied. It was found that > 85% of the Al and > 95% of the Fe were organically bound. The opposite was seen for Ca and Mg for which > 85% was modelled to occur as inorganic ions. The modelling results support the theory that LMW organic acids contribute to the translocation of Al and Fe in the podzolization process.

  • 13.
    van Hees, P. A. W.
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Lundström, Ulla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Giesler, R.
    Low molecular weight acids and their Al-complexes in soil solution- Composition, distribution and seasonal variation in three podzolized soils.2000In: Geoderma, ISSN 0016-7061, E-ISSN 1872-6259, Vol. 94, no 2-4, p. 173-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low molecular weight organic acids have been determined qualitatively and quantitatively over a growing season in the soil solution of three podzolized soil profiles. Several low molecular weight (LMW) acids such as citric, shikimic, oxalic, fumaric, formic, acetic, malonic, malic, lactic and t-aconitic acids were identified in the range < 1-1100 μM. Citric acid was the acid generally present at the highest concentrations (15-250 μM) in the upper layers while shikimic and oxalic acids could be observed in all horizons at lower concentrations. The levels of LMW organic acids were always greatest in the organic (O) horizon, and declined in the deeper layers. The fraction of the dissolved organic carbon and total acidity made up by LMW acids was generally in the range 0.5-5% and 0.5-15%, respectively. No apparent seasonal variations were observed, and the differences between the sites were little. The fraction of Al in soil solution bound to LMW organic acids was evaluated using ultrafiltration (< 1000D) and size exclusion chromatography. Fe < 1000D was also determined. For the O1 horizon about 40% and 20% of the Al and Fe, respectively, were detected in the LMW fraction (< 1000D). The LMW fraction of the two elements decreased deeper down in the profile, but relative increases were sometimes observed in the B1 horizon. Labile and LMW (< 1000D) Si were determined by FIA and ultrafiltration, respectively. The results show that a major fraction (80-100%) of the Si is labile and of low molecular weight, most likely silicic acid. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  • 14.
    van Hees, P. A. W.
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Lundström, Ulla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Starr, M.
    Giesler, R.
    Factors influencing aluminium concentrations in soil solution of podzols2000In: Geoderma, ISSN 0016-7061, E-ISSN 1872-6259, Vol. 94, no 2-4, p. 289-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mechanisms controlling the concentrations of free Al3+ and total Al in the soil solution from three podzolic soils were evaluated. Saturation indices (SI) were calculated for five mineral phases, but no single phase determined the Al3+ activity. E horizon samples were found to be undersaturated with respect to all phases. A more detailed equilibrium study indicated that formation of proto-imogolite sols was commonly possible in B horizon solutions with pH > 5. The poor relationship between pH and pAl3+ in the E and B1 horizons did not support control by exchange reactions with solid organic matter, although partial least square (PLS) regressions indicated importance of soil-exchangeable Al in the B and C horizons. It was concluded that in the E and most of the B1 horizon solutions, Al3+ activity is controlled by equilibrium with soluble organic acids which was supported by the PLS regressions. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  • 15.
    van Hees, P. A. W.
    et al.
    Örebro University.
    Rosling, A.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala.
    Lundström, Ulla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Finlay, R. D.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala.
    The biogeochemical impact of ectomycorrhizal conifers on major soil elements (Al, Fe, K and Si)2006In: Geoderma, ISSN 0016-7061, E-ISSN 1872-6259, Vol. 136, no 1-2, p. 364-377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobilisation of nutrients and dissolution of minerals are of key importance for plant growth and soil formation, as well as long term ecosystem sustainability. The effects of Pinus sylvestris seedlings, ectomycorrhizal colonisation and potassium supply on the mobilisation of Al, Fe, K and Si were studied in a soil column experiment. Budgets were constructed considering amounts in drainage water, accumulation in plants and changes in the pools of exchangeable ions (BaCl2 extractions). Drainage was the most important sink under the experimental conditions imposed, but the other two pools were also of quantitative significance. Plants had a significant positive effect on the total quantities of all elements mobilized. Mycorrhizal colonisation had limited quantitative impact on the mobilization, probably because the chosen mycorrhizal fungi did not cause any growth promotion in this experiment. Despite this, a multivariate analysis (PCA) showed a clear separate grouping of mycorrhizal, non-mycorrhizal and no-plant treatments, and in particular Si and K mobilization was related to soil biological variables which in turn were affected by the presence of mycorrhiza. When K was omitted from the watering solution, plants were able to mobilise significantly more K, which was reflected in plant uptake and a potential replenishment of the exchangeable pool. Up-scaling of total Al, K and Si mobilization to field conditions resulted in rates between equal to and up to 10 times higher than the average historical weathering rate.

  • 16.
    Vestin, Jenny L. K.
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Norström, Sara H
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Bylund, Dan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Lundström, Ulla S
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Soil solution and stream water chemistry in a forested catchment II: Influence of organic matter2008In: Geoderma, ISSN 0016-7061, E-ISSN 1872-6259, Vol. 144, no 2008, p. 271-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Differences between recharge and discharge areas in soil forming processes and nutrient conditions were observed in an earlier study of a catchment area in central Sweden (63°07′N, 16°70′E; Vestin, J.L.K., Norström, S.H., Bylund, D., Mellander, P-E., Lundström, U.S., submitted for publication to Geoderma. Soil solution and stream water chemistry in a forested catchment, I Dynamics.). To further examine the factors that determine the soil and stream water properties in the catchment area, the present study focused on the organic dynamics and the association of cations to different size fractions of organic matter. Six sampling plots were established in each of the recharge and discharge areas, respectively, with samples taken in June 2004. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and cation concentrations in the soil solution and stream water were determined. In the recharge area, low molecular mass (LMM) organics played an important role in transportation of several cations through the soil profile, inducing the podzolisation process by associating with Al and Fe. In the discharge area close to the stream, high molecular mass (HMM) organics appeared to play a crucial role in transportation of cations. Here the majority of recovered cations were associated with HMM organic matter, inhibiting the podzolisation process. The total concentration of C and DOC was higher than in the recharge area, and the concentration of cations increased with depth in the mineral soil. In the stream water, as in the discharge area soil solution, all carboxylic groups were associated to cations. Both Al and Fe were completely associated with the HMM DOC fraction, which indicated a rapid turnover of LMM DOC in stream water. Thus we conclude that DOC plays an important role in soil forming processes, and that its different size fractions have large effects on the transportation of elements in different soils and in stream water.

  • 17.
    Vestin, Jenny L. K.
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Norström, Sara H
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Bylund, Dan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Mellander, Per-Erik
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Lundström, Ulla S
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Soil solution and stream water chemistry in a forested catchment I: Dynamics2008In: Geoderma, ISSN 0016-7061, E-ISSN 1872-6259, Vol. 144, no 1/2, p. 256-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Soil solution and stream water chemistry were studied during two years in a catchment in Bispgården in central Sweden (63°07′N, 16°70′E). Soil samples and soil solution were collected in a slope at two distances (10 and 80 m) from a stream. The aims were to examine interactions between recharge (podzol) and discharge (arenosol) areas and to investigate the relations between soil solution and stream water chemistry. The parent material was similar within the catchment, but the content of C and N were higher in the discharge area most likely due to the difference in hydrological conditions compared to the recharge area. Exchangeable cations and base saturation were higher in the discharge area than in the recharge area, which may be due to the higher content of C. The concentrations in soil solution of H, DOC, NO3, SO4, Al, Si, Ca and K charge area compared to the recharge area which was probably caused by transportation of elements in soil and retention due to the increased content of C. During snow melt, the concentrations in soil solution of DOC, SO4, Al, Si, Ca and K were low due to dilution and low biological activity. The concentrations were then increasing during the seasons as an effect of biological activity and mineral weathering. NO3 concentration in soil solution was found in higher concentrations during snow melting and was then diminishing during summer likely as a result of biological uptake. After a dry period followed by an intensive rain in August 2003, the stream water chemistry was markedly altered for a few days. The concentrations of H, DOC SO4, Al and Ca were increased and the concentration of Si was decreased in the stream water. It therefore appeared that the stream water mirrored the upper soil horizons in the discharge area during high flows, while reflecting the lower soil horizons and ground water during low flows.

  • 18.
    Vestin, Jenny
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Nambu, Kei
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    van Hees, P. A. W.
    Örebro University.
    Bylund, Dan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Lundström, Ulla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    The influence of alkaline and non-alkaline parent material on soil chemistry2006In: Geoderma, ISSN 0016-7061, E-ISSN 1872-6259, Vol. 135, p. 97-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The gneiss bedrock at Alnö Island, (62o24N, 17o30E) in the middle of Sweden, has alkaline intrusions interspersed in narrow dikes. This gives an opportunity to study the impact of different parent material on soil solution in a homogeneous spruce stand. In this study, the alkaline parent materials gave rise to a soil solution with significantly (p 0.05) higher concentrations of DOC, SO4, NO3, Ca and Mg compared to the non-alkaline sites. For the deepest mineral horizons, 25-30cm, F and pH were also higher in the alkaline soil solutions. There were almost no differences between the organic horizons at alkaline and non-alkaline sites, probably explained by the influence of litter and recirculation of nutrients. The multivariate analyses emphasized the correlation between the parent material and the soil solution concentrations of Ca, Mg, PO4 and Al. The data were statistically evaluated by t-tests, ANOVA (Analysis of variances), PCA (Principal Component Analysis) and PLS (Partial Least Squares regression).

1 - 18 of 18
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf