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  • 1.
    Crusoe, Jonathan
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Informatik.
    Ahlin, Karin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Computer and System Science.
    Users' activities for using Open Government Data: A process framework2019In: Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, ISSN 1750-6166, E-ISSN 1750-6174, Vol. 13, no 3/4, p. 213-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - This research aims to develop a user process framework with activities and their variations for the use of open government data (OGD) based on empirical material and previous research. Open government data (OGD) is interoperable data that is shared by public organisations (publishers) for anyone (users) to reuse without restrictions to create new digital products and services. The user process was roughly identified in previous research but lacks an in-depth description. This lack can hamper the ability to encourage the use and the development of related theories.

    Design/methodology/approach - A three-stage research approach was used. Firstly, a tentative framework was created from previous research and empirical material. This stage involved three different literature reviews, data mapping, and seven interviews with OGD experts. The empirical material was analysed with inductive analysis, and previous research was integrated into the framework through concept mapping. Secondly, the tentative framework was reviewed by informed OGD experts. Thirdly, the framework was finalised with additional literature reviews, eight interviews with OGD users, and a member check, including all the respondents. The framework was used to guide the data collection and as a tool in the analysis.

    Findings -The user process framework covers activities and related variations, where the included phases are: start, identify, acquire, enrich, and deploy. The start varies relating to the intended use of the OGD. In the identify phase, the user is exploring the accessible data to decide if the data is relevant. In the acquire phase, the user is preparing for the delivery of the data from the publisher and receiving it. In the enrich phase, the user is concocting and making something. In the final deploy phase, the user has a product or service that can be provided to end-users.

    Research limitations/implications - The framework development has some limitations: the framework needs testing and development in different contexts and further verification. The implications are that the framework can help guide researchers towards relevantand essential data of the user process, be used as a point of compari-son in analysis, and be used as a skeleton for more precious theories.

    Practical implications - The framework has some practical implications for users, publishers, and portals. It can introduce users to the user process and help them plan for the execution of it. The framework can help publishers understand how the users can work with their data and what can be expected of them. The framework can help portal owners to understand the portal's role between users and publishers and what functionality and features they can provide to support to the user.

    Originality/value - In previous research, no user process with an in-depth description was identified. However, several studies have given a rough recall. Thus, this research provides an in-depth description of the user process with its variations. The framework can support practice and leads to new research avenues.

  • 2.
    Giritli Nygren, Katarina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Monotonized administrators and personalized bureaucrats in the everyday practice of e-government: ideal typical occupations and processes of closure and stabilization in a Swedish municipality2010In: Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, ISSN 1750-6166, E-ISSN 1750-6174, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 322-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to analyse everyday practices in e-government from a labour perspective in order to understand how administrative rationalization and citizen service become connected in the organizational restructuring of the labour process, namely job codification and specification and rule observation.

    Design/methodology/approach – The analysis applies an organizational e-government implementation perspective and labour process theory to an analysis of a Swedish municipality's implementation of e-government, using both qualitative and quantitative data.

    Findings – The main finding is the formulation of two distinct types of ideal employee – “monotonized administrators” and “personalized bureaucrats” – who carry e-government work in different directions according to administrative rationalization and the service offered citizens.

    Originality/value – The paper extends our knowledge of everyday practices in e-government from a labour perspective. It offers practitioners as well as researchers new insights by analysing the transformation of practice as an ongoing process, characterized by micro-political translation processes amongst actors, actions, and meanings in both rhetoric and practice.

  • 3.
    Lindblad Gidlund, Katarina
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Giritli Nygren, Katarina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Diagnosing the techno-relational action space;: Finding institutional and individual dimensions for innovation in transformational government2011In: Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, ISSN 1750-6166, E-ISSN 1750-6174, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 364-378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The overall purpose of this paper is to contribute to the discussion of the IT-related public sector transformation by reintroducing the question of employees’ organisational power and position in technological and technocratic systems.

     

    Design/methodology/approach – To examine how formal organisational positions, together with the way in which employees position themselves in relation to technology, affect how employees interpret their accessible action space (position and action strategy) a survey in a local municipality were conducted.

    Findings – As indicated by our hypothesis, the empirical results verify that the techno-relational action space is two-dimensional, consisting of both a formal position (how the organisational members are positioned) and a certain amount of action space outside a formal position (i.e. how they are position themselves). Elaborating on these dimensions generates rewarding insights into a micro-change perspective where technology-related innovation processes are concerned.

    Originality/value – The paper combines analysis of how the organisational members position themselves in relation to technology with how they are positioned organisationally in relation to technology and structures of power. Instead, we claim, that he techno-relational space is both a matter of how the organisational members position themselves in relation to technology and a matter of how they are positioned organisationally in relation to technology and structures of power.

    Practical implications: Identifying and acknowledging employees perceived techno-relational action space is of great importance in understanding organisational members’ participation, cooperation and innovative capability in government transformation.

     

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