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  • 1. Engström, A.
    et al.
    Söderberg, Siv
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Transition as experienced by close relatives of people with traumatic brain injury2011In: Journal of Neuroscience Nursing, ISSN 0888-0395, E-ISSN 1945-2810, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 253-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When someone is afflicted by a traumatic brain injury (TBI), it entails a sudden change in the lives of their close relatives. Relatives provide the primary support system for the person with TBI, and new living patterns have to be developed by the family to achieve balance in the new situation. There is an absence of studies focusing on the process of transition for people living close to a person with TBI, especially in a long-term relationship. The aim of this study, therefore, was to describe such transitions experienced by the close relatives of people with TBI. Five close relatives, all women, who lived with or close to a person with TBI in the northern part of Sweden, were interviewed. The data were analyzed in accordance with the qualitative interpretive method and performed in a series of steps to arrive at a description of the transition. The findings of the analysis are presented in 4 categories: the starting point of the transitions, transitions in pattern of daily life, transitions in relationship, and transitions in social life. The transitions of daily life for close relatives began suddenly as the person with TBI was injured unexpectedly. The relatives could feel lonely as former friends were gone or avoided them. How the person with TBI was met by other people strongly affected how the close relatives felt. Although they struggled to lessen the dependence of the person with TBI on them, they also felt anxious about how things would be if close relatives were no longer there for that person. The findings are discussed with reference to works by the philosophers Buber, Lévinas, and Lögstrup and theories of transition. © 2011 American Association of Neuroscience Nurses.

  • 2. Jumisko, E.
    et al.
    Lexell, J.
    Söderberg, Siv
    The meaning of living with traumatic brain injury in people with moderate or severe traumatic brain injury2005In: Journal of Neuroscience Nursing, ISSN 0888-0395, E-ISSN 1945-2810, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 42-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A traumatic brain injury (TBI) extensively affects the injured person's daily life. Research based on the perspectives of people with TBI can increase understanding of the challenges they face and the possibility of supporting them in managing their lives. The aim of this study was to elucidate the meaning of living with TBI as narrated by the people with moderate or severe TBI. The data were collected by means of qualitative research interviews with 12 participants who had lived with TBI for 4-13 years. A phenomenological hermeneutic method was used to interpret the transcribed interviews. The study showed that people with TBI had lost their way and struggled to achieve a new normalcy. Losing one's way included experiences of waking up to unknown, missing relationships and experiencing the body as an enemy. Participants' struggles to attain a new normalcy included searching for an explanation, recovering the self, wishing to be met with respect, and finding a new way of living. Living with TBI seems to mean living with a perpetually altered body that changed the whole life and caused deep suffering, where feelings of shame and dignity competed with each other. Participants seem to be quite alone in their suffering and need more support from healthcare professionals.

  • 3.
    Kitzmuller, Gabriele
    et al.
    Univ Tromso, Dept Hlth & Care Sci, Fac Hlth Sci, Tromso, Norway .
    Asplund, Kenneth
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Häggström, Terttu
    Narvik Univ Coll, Dept Hlth & Soc, Narvik, Norway .
    The Long-Term Experience of Family Life After Stroke2012In: Journal of Neuroscience Nursing, ISSN 0888-0395, E-ISSN 1945-2810, Vol. 44, no 1, p. E1-E13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stroke is a life-threatening and disabling illness known to have a significant impact on families. The purpose of this study was to illuminate the long-term experience of family life after stroke of stroke survivors and their spouses and children, particularly regarding marital and parent-child relationships. Thirty-seven narrative interviews were conducted with stroke survivors and their spouses and adult children who were minors at onset of the illness. A qualitative approach inspired by Gadamer's hermeneutic and van Manen's phenomenological understanding of lived experience was used. The analysis revealed four themes: the family as a lifebuoy, absent presence, broken foundations, and finding a new marital path. Lack of communication and altered roles and relationships endangered marital equilibrium and parent-child relationships after stroke. This study highlighted the need for professional family support as families were unprepared for the life changes that occurred. Nurses and other healthcare workers should examine family relationships and communication patterns and view the family as a unit composed of unique persons with different needs. Further research on the experiences of stroke survivors' children seems urgent.

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