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  • 1.
    Hildingsson, Ingegerd
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Sjöling, Mats
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Fathers experiences of support during pregnancy and the first year following childbirth - Findings from a Swedish regional survey2011In: Journal of Men's Health, ISSN 1875-6867, E-ISSN 1875-6859, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 258-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Support during pregnancy is mainly directed towards pregnant women, although parenthood is viewed as a joint project by society and by parents themselves. Research has shown that fathers often feel excluded by health care professionals. The aim of the present study was to describe personal and professional sources of support used by prospective and new fathers and to study factors associated with fathers having no support from anyone in mid-pregnancy. Methods: This was a prospective longitudinal study of 655 new fathers living in a northern part of Sweden who completed four questionnaires. Results: The majority of fathers reported having good personal support at most time points, but 18% reported that they did not have support from anyone, when asked in mid-pregnancy. A logistic regression analysis showed that the following factors were associated with not receiving support from anyone: having previous children (odds ratio (OR) = 3.4; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.7-7.0, P <0.001), expectations from the midwife to attend antenatal visits (OR = 1.9; 95% CI = 1.1-3.4, P <0.05), not attending parent education classes (OR = 2.3; 95% CI = 1.1-4.8, P <0.05), not feeling involved by the prenatal midwife (OR = 1.9; 95% CI = 1.1-3.3, P <0.05), and not being offered the opportunity to attend fathers' groups (OR = 3.5; 95% CI = 1.1-12.3, P <0.05). Conclusion: Although personal support seemed satisfying for the majority of fathers, those with no support from close family/friends also lacked support from midwives as well in terms of the organization of care.

  • 2. Johansson, Margareta
    et al.
    Edwardsson, Cecilia
    Hildingsson, Ingegerd
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Nursing Sciences.
    The “Pregnant Man” - Expecting Fathers Experience Pregnancy-Related Changes: A Longitudinal Study With a Mixed Method Approach2015In: Journal of Men's Health, ISSN 1875-6867, E-ISSN 1875-6859, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 8-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Fathers’ mental and physical health is important for men’s well-being, as well as for their partner’s and children’s health. The study objectives were to describe how expectant fathers experienced physical and emotional changes, the prevalence of the changes, and whether the sensations changed over time. Methods: We used a longitudinal study with a mixed-method approach that included quantitative and qualitative data collected by questionnaires completed in their partner’s mid-pregnancy and late pregnancy. Descriptive and inferential statistics and content analysis were used. Results: In total, 871 Swedish expectant fathers participated. The proportion of emotional changes decreased from 60% in mid-pregnancy to 47% in late pregnancy (P < 0.001), and these changes included positive and negative impact on mental health, the emotional relationship developed with the partner and unborn baby, and reflections of fatherhood. Physical changes experienced increased from 12% in mid-pregnancy to 18% in late pregnancy (P = 0.001) and involved negative and positive aspects, or no impact on physical health. Physical changes reported implied change in the sexual relationship. Conclusions: More than half the expectant fathers experienced some degree of emotional change during their partner’s pregnancy, and one in five experienced physical changes. Emotional and physical changes affected the expectant fathers’ mental and physical health. Expectant fathers seem to undergo a vulnerable process leading to fatherhood.

  • 3.
    Johansson, Margareta
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Rubertsson, Christine
    Inst för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Department of Women's and Childrens Health, Uppsala universitet.
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Department of Caring Sciences, Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Hildingsson, Ingegerd
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    The Internet: one important source for pregnancy and childbirth information among prospective fathers2010In: Journal of Men's Health, ISSN 1875-6867, E-ISSN 1875-6859, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 249-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Fathers' involvement in pregnancy and childbirth has increased, and this can benefit their own health as well as their partners' and children's health. The objective of this study was to investigate the sources of pregnancy and childbirth information that expectant fathers used in pregnancy, with a specific focus on the Internet. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 1105 prospective fathers in Sweden. Data were collected in a single year by means of a questionnaire in mid-pregnancy. Results: The Internet was used by 58% of the fathers. The Internet as a source of information was more often used by fathers expecting their first child (relative risk (RR) = 1.4; range = 1.2-1.7), fathers with a high level of education (RR = 1.3; range = 1.2-1.5) and those who had a previous experience of caesarean section (RR = 1.3; range = 1.1-1.6). Other important sources for pregnancy and childbirth information were the midwife and the pregnant partner. Conclusions: The Internet is, in addition to the midwife and the pregnant partner, a common source of pregnancy and childbirth information for prospective fathers. Antenatal caregivers need to be updated about preferable web sites for pregnancy and childbirth information, and give the couple a chance to reflect and talk about what they retrieve from the Internet

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