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  • 1.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Eriksson, Lina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Lagrosen, Yvonne
    A health-related quality management approach to evaluating health promotion activities2012In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 76-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Purpose

    – The purpose of this paper is to describe health promotion activities accomplished within a

    project and to measure the conditions for sustainable health within the case organizations. Also, the

    purpose is to test a previously developed measurement approach, which measures health-related

    quality management.

    Design/methodology/approach

    – A health promotion project currently being carried out at eight

    Swedish elementary schools has been studied. In earlier research a measurement approach was

    developed to measure health-related quality management. The approach was handed out to the

    co-workers at the eight different schools in the initial stage of the project. The leaders at the schools

    were informed of the results of their own school and the mean value of all the eight schools. The

    consistency and reliability of the statements within the approach was tested.

    Findings

    – A description of health promotion activities accomplished and planned within the project

    can be found. The results from the measurement of the health-related quality management in the eight

    schools are presented, together with the mean score of all schools. The test of the measurement

    approach is presented and discussed.

    Originality/value

    – A description of health promotion activities can help managers and project

    leaders to plan and carry out valuable health promotion activities in their striving for both sustainable

    health among the co-workers and efficient organizations. This measurement approach can help

    managers and project leaders to measure the effects of the health promotion activities.

  • 2.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Johansson, Catrin
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Media and Communication Science.
    How Communicative Leadership influences co-workers’ health: A Quality Management perspective2016In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 143-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to describe leaders’ views on how Communicative Leadership influences co-worker health by comparing their opinions with the health-related values within Quality Management.

    Design/methodology/approach - A multinational manufacturing organization that has been working with Communicative Leadership for several years was investigated. 21 managers trained in Communicative Leadership were interviewed and asked about their views on how their communication influences both the well-being of their co-workers and the working environment. Various communication behaviors and communication methodologies emerged from the interviews and were then analyzed versus the health-related Quality Management dimensions.

    Findings - The result shows concrete communication behavior and methodologies that influence co-worker well-being and the working environment positively and negatively. Another result is a description of the prerequisites for managers to be able to communicate in a way that influences co-worker well-being and the working environment. The analysis of the communication behaviors and communication methodologies versus the health-related Quality Management values shows that several of the health-related Quality Management dimensions were present.

    Research limitations/implications – A limitation of this research is that it is just managers’ view that has been investigated and analyzed.

    Practical implications – Managers acting and behaving in accordance with the communicative behaviors and methodologies described in the results can influence co-worker health and the working environment in a positive way. The level of awareness of the prerequisites could help managers to influence co-worker well-being and create a good working environment.

    Originality/value – The connection between Communicative Leadership and health-related Quality Management values is rarely made. This research can contribute to greater understanding in both areas.

    Keywords Health-related Quality Management, co-worker health, Communicative Leadership, well-being, working environment.

    Paper type Research paper. 

  • 3.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Snyder, Kristen
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Hedlund, Christer
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Management and Mechanical Engineering.
    Capturing value-based leadership in practice: Insights from developing and applying an AI-interview guide2018In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 422-430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to present and discuss the results from the appreciative inquiry (AI)-inspired interviews to explore the underlying values held by top managers and to identify soft aspects ofleadership.Design/methodology/approach – Top managers were interviewed as a part of a research project withthe aim to support the development of value-based leadership that integrates company values, organizationalculture, customer needs and sustainable development. A structured interview guide, inspired by AI, wasdeveloped and used to pinpoint their motivation and vision of a good organization to understand the valuesthat the managers had and to identify soft aspects of leadership. The interviews were analyzed in workshopswith the whole research teamand structured and visualized through affinity diagrams.Findings – The results showed the underlying values held by top managers and identified soft aspects ofleadership.Practical implications – The presented interview guide can be used to identify the top managers’underlying values, and the presented results from the interviews can be used to inspire other managers andleaders to develop their leadership in their striving of good leadership and effective organizations.Originality/value – The paper explains how to apply an AI-inspired interview guide in finding out valuebasedleadership and soft aspects of leadership for enhancing organizational culture.

  • 4.
    Cronemyr, Peter
    et al.
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Rönnbäck, Åsa
    SIQ.
    Quality culture deployment: using behaviours to explain, diagnose and improve a quality culture2017In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 9, no 3/4, p. 498-518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Today’s organizations face the challenge of measuring the right things and then using those measurements as a starting point to work with improved quality. The failure to generate a shared value base is pointed out as one main cause for the inability to effectively apply Quality Management and Lean within organizations, thus it appears central to measure these values. However, the measuring of values and behaviours, seems to be missing within both concepts. Therefore, there is a need for a tool that measures not only quality values, but also behaviours that support or obstruct a quality culture. The purpose of this paper is to describe how a measuring tool which measures Quality Culture can be designed and structured. Methodology/approach – A project with the aim to measure and develop Quality Culture started in 2015 by three Swedish universities/institutes and seven organizations. During several workshops quality values and supportive and obstructive behaviours were developed and described. This resulted in a survey where employees of the participating organizations ranked performance and importance of the described behaviours. The results were presented and discussed in a fourth workshop. Findings – A framework of behaviours and a measurement tool for a Quality Culture are presented in this paper. Originality/value – The framework of behaviours, supporting or obstructing a Quality Culture, is original and may be very useful to diagnose and develop a Quality Culture.

  • 5.
    Eriksson, Maria
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Building an organizational culture when delivering commercial experiences – the leaders’ perspective2016In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 229-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to identify, present and analyze the strengths and weaknesses mentioned by leaders when describing how their organization works with creating customer value in commercial experiences. Furthermore, the overall research purpose is to explore the creation of customer value in commercial experiences.

    Design/methodology/approach – An interview study with eight managers focused on how their organization creates customer value when offering commercial experiences. Results were analyzed with regard to creating customer value, customer involvement and development of new experiences.

    Findings – A literature study confirms an increasing interest in commercial experiences both financially and because of customer demand. The conducted interview study found several areas of improvement where the greatest potential was in the building of a strong organizational culture based on values to ensure co-creation of customer value between the organization and the customer. Also found to be important were working with customer involvement when co-producing the experience,discovering customer expectations and measuring the results of the delivered customer value.

    Originality/value – When it comes to commercial experiences, one of the keys to creating customer value is the element of surprise and delivering the unexpected. This advocates studying the theory of attractive quality, discovering the unspoken needs of the customer.

  • 6.
    Lilja, Johan
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Hansen, David
    Resonans A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Fredrikson, Johan
    Amplify, Åre.
    Richardsson, Daniel
    Styrkebaserad.org, Östersund.
    Is Innovation the Future of Quality Management?: Searching for signs of quality and innovation management merging2017In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 9, no 3-4, p. 232-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Upcoming as well as mature industries are facing pressure as regards successfully managing operational excellence, and, at the same time, driving and managing innovation. Quality management concepts and practices’ ability to tackle this challenge have been questioned. It has even been suggested that there is a need to provide and promote an updated/changed, and even re-branded, version of Total Quality Management, merging quality management (QM) and innovation management (IM). Can such a shift then actually be spotted? The purpose of this paper is to explore and see if there are any signs suggesting that QM and IM actually are about to merge. Design/methodology/approach: The study is based on literature reviews, document studies and interviews. Findings: The paper highlights three signs indicating that QM and IM indeed are approaching each other, and that it is a movement driven from both sectors, e.g., in the work with new ISO-standards and the Toyota Kata framework. Originality/value: The indicated development has fundamental and extensive practical implications. It will for example have to be followed by a similar merging of the two fields in the educational system, and in the competences of future managers.

  • 7.
    Lilja, Johan
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Richardsson, Daniel
    Putting Appreciative Design into Practice: A Case Study of a Course Evaluation and Design Process2012In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 4-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Appreciative Inquiry (AI) is an inquiry into the “best of” what already exists in a system. Applying AI at the start of a design process gives you a process that is very different from traditional design approaches. Simply put, you obtain a design process that has as its point of departure identified strengths: “the best of what is”. This is in sharp contrast to traditional design processes that typically starts from identified problems. You obtain a design process based on the best of what is, in other words you achieve “Appreciative Design”. The overall purpose of this paper is to explore and contribute to a process of putting Appreciative Design into practice. More specifically, the paper aims at introducing a process for Appreciative Design to be used in the development of higher education together with insights from applying it in practice.

    Methodology/approach

    The methodology chosen can be described as “action research”. The researchers have, in their role as educational leaders, developed and applied a process for Appreciative Design within the context of the entrepreneurial educational program “Skarp Åre - Business and product development” at Mid Sweden University.

    Findings

    The paper introduces a process for Appreciative Design to be used in the development of higher education together with insights from applying it in practice. The process introduced is referred to as Appreciative Course Evaluation and Design (ACED). Furthermore, applying the ACED process to the “Skarp Åre – Business and product development” educational program reveals a number of benefits in comparison to conventional practice. The benefits found include higher commitment by the course participants, lower risk in the design process, and increased student involvement in the evaluation and design process.

    Value of the paper

    The paper contributes in general to increasing the understanding of how the strengths and principles of Appreciative Inquiry can be incorporated into design processes. The case study performed also contributes new insights into how and why to apply the introduced ACED process to the evaluation and design of higher education. Our hope is that the insights presented will inspire future research and application of Appreciative Design not only to the evaluation and design of higher education, but also to the evaluation and design of products, services, organizations and society.

  • 8.
    Lilja, Johan
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Richardsson, Daniel
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Why is it Suddenly so Easy to Change?2015In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 7, no 2/3, p. 334-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to contribute with knowledge concerning how to drive, generate and energize change and development in social systems. A potential key to meet this challenge is the strength-based change management approach called appreciative inquiry (AI). A centralcomponent of AI is the “AI interview”, which has evolved into a distinct activity that enables the past and the future to be used as a generative source for on-going learning about strengths, opportunities,aspirations and results. The AI interview has in previous studies shown an often surprisingly high ability to generate development and change in social systems. However, the understanding of the generative “mystery” of the AI interview, focusing on the value experienced by both the people conducting the interview and those being interviewed, is still in need of further exploration. Furthermore, the evident generativity of the AI interview has not yet been integrated to any large extent into quality management. The purpose of this paper is to change that.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The researchers have studied the customer experience of conducting an AI interview based on feedback from 97 AI students at Mid Sweden University.

    Findings

    Among the results, eight categories of value are identified.

    Originality/value

    The paper contributes with new knowledge concerning the values experienced during participation in an AI interview. The paper also highlights ideas on how the generativity of the AI interview could be increasingly integrated into quality management.

  • 9.
    Palm, Klas
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Algehed, Jessica
    Mistra Urban Future, Göteborg.
    Exploring enablers of innovative quality development in public administration2017In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 203-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Today’s public administration is facing a wide range of challenges. This situation requires an ability to change and innovate. However, difficulties in the implementation of innovations have been seen as the cause of many administrations’ inability to achieve the intended benefits of innovations. The purpose of this study is, therefore, to empirically determine which – out of a wide range of enabling factors for innovations – may be the most important for the specific process step of moving from ideas to implementation of innovations in a public administration context, and, furthermore, to identify possible additional enablers for this specific process step. Design/methodology/approach: This study is a qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews with city officials in four cities on four continents. Findings: The study identifies five key enablers for transforming ideas into implemented innovations in public administration: a committed and hands-on leadership, internal as well as external networking, innovation processes over time alternately organized as a separate project and, as part of the standard operating procedures, a system understanding, including an understanding of how the parts contribute to a shared vision and communication of achieved, tangible, short-term results. Three of these enablers are previously identified as overall enablers for innovation and two complement previously identified enablers. Originality/value: The article identifies enabling factors for the specific step of going from idea generation to implementation of innovations in a public sector context. The article also reviews enabling factors from real experiences. Much of the former literature is conceptual. The article analyses an area in which there is a general lack of empirical research.

     

    Today’s public administration is facing a wide range of challenges. This situation requires an ability to change and innovate. However, difficulties in the implementation of innovations have been seen as the cause of many administrations’ inability to achieve the intended benefits of innovations. The aim with this study is therefore to empirically determine which - out of a wide range of enabling factors for innovations - may be the most important for the specific process step of moving from ideas to implementation of innovations in a public administration context, and furthermore, to identify possible additional enablers for this specific process step.

     

    Design

     

    This study is a qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews with city officials in four cities on four continents.

     

    Findings

     

    The study identifies five key enablers for transforming ideas into implemented innovations in public administration: a) A committed and hands-on leadership, b) internal as well as external networking, c) innovation processes over time alternately organized as a separate project, and as part of the standard operating procedures, d) a system understanding including an understanding of how the parts contribute to a shared vision and e) communication of achieved, tangible, short-term results. Three of these enablers are previously identified as overall enablers for innovation and two complement previously identified enablers.

     

    Originality

     

    The article identifies enabling factors for the specific step of going from idea generation to implementation of innovations in a public sector context. The article also reviews enabling factors from real experiences. Much of the former literature is conceptual. The article analyses an area in which there is a general lack of empirical research. 

  • 10.
    Palm, Klas
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Key enabling factors for organizational ambidexterity in the public sector2017In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 2-20, article id IJQSS-04-2016-0038Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The capability of an organization to perform not only incremental quality improvements to the existing processes and products but also innovative or radical improvements that explore new opportunities is referred to as organizational ambidexterity. Research indicates that the long-term success of organizations demands a dynamic balancing of and excelling at both perspectives. However, there is considerably less clarity as regards how this can be achieved. The purpose of this paper is to empirically explore enabling factors for organizational ambidexterity in the public sector.

    Design/methodology/approach – This study is a qualitative study based on interviews with managers at two public organizations in Sweden. The analysis is conducted using a soft system methodology.

    Findings – Nine enabling factors for organizational ambidexterity are identi ed and presented in two pictures inspired by the Soft System Methodology. The study indicates that it above all is important to create leeway for exploration to achieve organizational ambidexterity in the public sector. The study strengthens the belief that some quality movement values and tools can be considered important, whereas others can counteract the ability to achieve organizational ambidexterity in public administration.

    Practical implications – Practitioners and scholars can use the identi ed enablers and the Soft System Methodology presented in this study to examine and develop the organizational ambidexterity of other public organizations. Originality/value – This study explores empirically the concept of ambidexterity in the public sector, a perspective that few previous scholars have studied. 

  • 11.
    Palm, Klas
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Lilja, Johan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Wiklund, Håkan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Agencies, it’s Time to Innovate!: Exploring the current understanding of the Swedish government’s call for innovation2015In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 34-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Innovation is currently at the top of many agendas worldwide: not only in the private sector, but also when it comes to increasing quality, efficiency, and effectiveness in public administration. InSweden, this is reflected in the recent call from the Government for innovation in public management. However, innovation has not traditionally occurred to any significant extent on the strategic level of Swedish public management. Furthermore, governmental administration is a complex system in need of coordination and alignment for this new call to be effectively realized in practice.  

     

    The purpose of this paper is hence to explore the phenomenon of innovation in the current Swedish governmental administration system. More specifically, the paper explores the current understanding within the system of what innovation is, as well as why and how it should be achieved.

     

    Methodology/approach This study has been based on a qualitative approach with a case consisting of three embedded units: the Government itself, a ministry and a government agency. The data have been collected from documents and interviews.

     

    Findings

    The study shows that there is currently a notable disparity when it comes to how aspects of innovation are understood at different levels within the Swedish governmental administration system. Furthermore, the recent business development to increase the standardization of work processes is perceived as having created poorer preconditions for working with innovations.

     

    Practical implications

    The results highlight critical areas of disparity and possibilities for improvement towards a shared understanding and aligned innovation actions within the system.

     

    Originality/value

    The articlecontributes knowledgeabout the current understanding of innovation in the Swedish governmental administration system.

  • 12.
    Snyder, Kristen
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Engaged leaders develop schools as quality organisations2015In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 7, no 2-3, p. 217-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This paper explores the question, “what does it mean to be an engaged school leader in an educational context that promotes standards-based accountability as a model of quality development?” Specifically, what drives educational leaders? What do they do to lead schools as quality organisations? and How do they lead schools as quality organisations? Design/methodology/approach – An ethnographically grounded theory case study was conducted with 16 principles in Sweden, USA and Finland, who participated in a three-year project to lead schools as global learning centers. Findings – Findings showed that school leaders used a variety of leadership styles as they developed worked cultures grounded in a value system, to support student learning and development. Also, work cultures that engaged members of the school and community were critical for leading schools as learning organisations. Research limitations/implications – The small sample may not be generalizable to all educational systems. Practical implications – This study provides evidence about the complexities for school leadership today that are not currently addressed in most principal preparation programs. The findings can serve to help inform further development of principal preparation. Originality/value – The experiences shared in this study provide an alternative perspective about what it is that school leaders do and think about amidst a high-stakes testing context of school development. The grounded theory nature of this study, combined with an ethnographic approach, provides deep insights into the daily working life of engaged school leaders to learn first hand from their dialogue about what it takes to lead schools as quality organisations. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 13.
    Snyder, Kristen
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Hedlund, Christer
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Storytelling: a co-creative process to support value-based leadership2017In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 9, no 3/4, p. 484-497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to identify constraints and possibilities to develop a value-based leadership in manufacturing using storytelling as a co-creative method and process.

    Design/methodology/approach

    A multi-site case study was conducted in which storytelling was used as a data collection tool and co-creative process to explore dimensions in the company’s cultures that could provide a deeper understanding about the constraints and possibilities that exist for developing value-based leadership in manufacturing.

    Findings

    Storytelling has a positive impact on leadership and communication highlighting important aspects of the organizational culture to support sustainable development and innovation.

    Originality/value

    This study demonstrates how storytelling can be used by leaders in manufacturing to build cultures of innovation and sustainability. And identifies constrains and possibilities for developing value-based leadership.

  • 14.
    Snyder, Kristen
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Ingelsson, Pernilla
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Enhancing the study of Lean transformation through organizational culture analysis2016In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 395-411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify and synthesize approaches to studying Lean transformation to further develop a comprehensive approach that integrates organizational culture analysis and performance measurement systems from a systems perspective. Design/methodology/approach: This paper is conceptual in nature and based on a review of the literature in the areas of measuring Lean transformation and studying organizational culture. Three questions guide this conceptual analysis: “What approaches have been used to examine Lean transformation in business and public sector organizations?”; “Is there evidence of a focus on organizational culture in the measurement practices in Lean transformation and, if so, how?”; and “What can we learn from organizational cultural theorists about developing a more comprehensive framework to study Lean transformation?”. The analysis was conducted in two phases: In Phase 1, a database search was conducted using the key words Lean transformation, studying Lean, studying Lean transformation, studying organizational culture in Lean and measuring Lean, from which eight papers were selected. In Phase 2, the authors reviewed two models for studying organizational culture. Findings: Findings indicated that the dominant approach to study and measure Lean transformation is based on the performance measurement model. Based on this approach, there was little evidence of a focus on organizational culture, and few integrated the human dimensions with the tools and practices. The authors also found evidence of a greater awareness of the need to develop a balanced performance measurement system that reflects both the subjective soft measures and the objective hard measures. Among the approaches studied, two models did reflect integration between hard and soft measures: Dahlgaard et al.’s (2011) 4Ps and Najem et al. ’s (2012) assessment model for studying organizational culture in Lean. Both of these methods provide a strong framework from which to further enhance the study of Lean transformation by incorporating elements from Bantz’s (1993) organizational communication culture method and Martin’s (1992) Matrix concept. Originality/value: This paper furthers the academic dialogue on measuring Lean transformation through its unique analysis of studying organizational culture.

  • 15.
    Sundström, Malin
    et al.
    Institutionen för data- och affärsvetenskap, Högskolan i Borås.
    Lundberg, Christine
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Sciences.
    Giannakis, Stavroula
    Institutionen för data- och affärsvetenskap, Högskolan i Borås.
    Tourist Shopping Motivation: Go with the Flow or Follow the Plan2011In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 211-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The objective of the study is to describe and analyse different tourist shopping typologies based on their motives for visiting a shopping destination well known for its low prices.

    Design/methodology/approach – The data were collected by means of structured questionnaires administered to tourists visiting the Swedish destination. The survey instrument measured constructs designed to understand shopping motivation and feelings experienced during the course of shopping.

    Findings – Two distinct tourist shopping typologies were found, based on a tourist's primary purpose in travelling, and designated “Follow the Plan” and “Go with the Flow”. The present study proposes the use of a theoretical continuum that takes into account feelings experienced at a low-priced destination and consumer shopping motivations.

    Originality/value – This study contributes to the existing literature on tourism shopping by suggesting typologies built on feelings experienced and shopping motivations, thus providing new insights on tourist shopping typologies found at a low-price destination. Results are not general for any low-priced destination, thus further research is needed in other destinations as well.

  • 16.
    Åslund, Anna
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Management and customer value creation – learning from successful societal entrepreneurs2016In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to study management processes within successful Societal Entrepreneurship in order to further understand the role of management in customer value creation.

    Design/methodology/approach - management in three successful societal entrepreneurship initiatives that deliver societal value have been studied. Data have been collected through interviews, direct observation, participant observation and documentation. Management tasks, activities and behaviours have been identified and analysed to identify management processes and their input, output, main focus, drivers and relationship. The role of management in societal value creation has been analysed from a system view.

    Findings - The result presents essential management processes important for societal customer value creation, their input, output and main focus. Some management processes are inter-related and are sometimes part of another management process.  The management seem driven by ‘need’, ‘opportunity’, ‘interest’, and ‘demand’ when creating societal customer value. From a system perspective, management have an indirect role in societal customer value creation and are important for possibilities to create societal customer value. Both the initiative and the surroundings have been found to be of importance to the management’s scope for contributing to societal customer value creation.

    Originality/value – Studying successful societal entrepreneurial management and its role in customer value creation provides the possibility to understand and learn from management, its processes and role in societal customer value creation and how to successfully provide customer value to society and work with societal, environmental and sustainability issues.

    Article Classification: Case study

  • 17.
    Åslund, Anna
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics. Strömsunds Kommun.
    Bäckström, Ingela
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Quality Technology and Management, Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics.
    Management processes and management’s role in customer value creation2017In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 148-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to study management processes within successful societal entrepreneurship to further understand the role of management in customer value creation.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Management in three successful societal entrepreneurship initiatives has been studied. Data have been collected through interviews, direct observation, participant observation and documentation. Management tasks, activities and behaviours have been identified and analysed from a system view.

    Findings

    The result presents essential management processes important for societal customer value creation, their input, output and main focus. Some management processes are inter-related and are sometimes part of another management process. The management seems driven by “need”, “opportunity”, “interest” and “demand”, when creating societal customer value. From a system perspective, management has an indirect role in societal customer value creation and is important for possibilities to create societal customer value. Both the initiative and the surroundings have been found to be of importance to the management’s scope for contributing to societal customer value creation.

    Originality/value

    The study provides the possibility to understand and learn from management, the management processes and their role in societal customer value creation. Thereby, it describes how to successfully provide customer value to society and work with societal, environmental and sustainability issues.

1 - 17 of 17
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