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  • 1.
    Boström, Lena
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Institution of education.
    Do Ten-year-old Children in Sweden Know How They Learn?: A Study of How Young Students Believe They Learn Compared to Their Learning Styles Preferences2012In: International Education Studies, ISSN 1913-9020, E-ISSN 1913-9039, Vol. 5, no 6, p. 11-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Students’ individual learning strategies have been identified as important skills in order to succeed in school as well as important for lifelong learning. The Swedish steering documents are permeated by an epistemological and a methodological variation based on the individual student’s learning. Learning how to learn has been identi-fied by the EU as one of eight key competences. There is not much research on elementary school students and meta-learning. This study is therefore aimed to examine these students’ own perceptions of their learning, and compare how student think that they learn to their learning styles preferences according to the learning styles assessment Learning Styles Inventory (LSI). The theoretical framework is based on previous Swedish research and Dunn’s Learning Styles Model. A multi-method design was selected. After the LSI-test the students estimat-ed their preferences. Finally, interviews were conducted with 15 students. When comparing students’ learning styles profiles to their estimation of how they thought they learn, there was a clear discrepancy. The students estimated more preferences than was evident in the analysis. This applies above all to the perceptual strengths, and time of day. The smallest difference, however, was found in the environmental elements. The interviews showed that students have difficulties explaining how they learn. What the students pointed out, however, was their need to work in peace, learning by reading and working on the computer, and also varied learning environ-ments. Their response on learning showed that they were building their insights on the school context and expe-rience from there.

  • 2.
    Boström, Lena
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Education.
    Dalin, Rolf
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Computer and System science.
    Young people's opinion on rural Sweden2018In: International Education Studies, ISSN 1913-9020, E-ISSN 1913-9039, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 45-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focus on adolescents motivations about remaining in rural areas in the Mid Sweden Region, a part of Sweden with decreasing school performance scores and high out-migration. The study is based on 1,500 young people’s responses to a Web-based survey within the framework of a regional school development project. The research questions focused on: whether youths were going to stay there or move the future in urban or rural areas, influences, and the future choices and differences among genders, regions, and age groups. The empirical data are processed with statistical analysis. The study confirms previous research on young people’s relocations from rural areas; jobs and education are important motives, and the most prone to move are women. What is new knowledge is that lessons about the region’s importance have a positive, significant effect on individuals’ plans to remain in their home municipality. This can and should be highlighted in local, regional, and national politics, but more importantly in school discourses. Since school plays a role in students’ thinking and future choices, a larger formation effort could be of great value for norms and regional political standpoints. The study has relevance to the international terms of similar geographical areas.

  • 3.
    Gidlund, Ulrika
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Education.
    Boström, Lena
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Education.
    What is Inclusive Didactics?: Teachers´Understanding of Inclusive Didactics for Students with EBD in Swedish Mainstream Schools.2017In: International Education Studies, ISSN 1913-9020, E-ISSN 1913-9039, Vol. 10, no 5, p. 87-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Including students with emotional and behavioral difficulties (EBD) in general education is one of teachers’ greatest challenges and make the dilemma of inclusion displays its most difficult side. This article contributes to the understanding of how teachers in Swedish mainstream schools understand the concept of inclusive didactics for students with EBD. This article employs a directed qualitative content analysis supplemented with descriptive statistics related to the categories of inclusive didactics. Didactic theory was the basis of the predefined categories by which the analysis was completed. Empirical data were collected through 6 focus-group interviews and 37 individual follow-up interviews. The findings indicate that three didactic aspects were dominant in teachers’ understanding of inclusive didactics: Student(s), Methods, and Teacher. Less accentuated were Subject, Rhetoric and Interaction. Thus these teachers’ understanding and previous research is not consistent. The overall conclusion is that the concept of inclusive didactics is complex, complicated, and difficult for teachers to relate to. The descriptions are both vague and simplistic and therefore difficult for teachers to implement. This article clearly highlights that teachers often feel frustrated and inadequate, and blame themselves for the students’ deficiency and failure, thus concluding that strategies for distinct descriptions and teacher practices are needed.

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