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  • 1.
    Carlsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Edman, Mattias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Holm, Svante
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Jonsson, Bengt Gunnar
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Effect of heat on interspecific competition in saprotrophic wood fungi2014In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 11, p. 100-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some boreal wood fungi that are associated with forest fire or open dry habitats have an increased resistance to heat in comparison to species associated with a less specific distribution or species found in mesic forests. We hypothesize that extreme temperature-stress experienced during fires will favor species adapted to heat and, ultimately, the composition of species inhabiting logs in such habitats will change. Competitiveness after temperature stress was examined in three fire-associated species – Dichomitus squalens, Gloeophyllum sepiarium and Phlebiopsis gigantea – and three non fire-associated species – Ischnoderma benzoinum, Phellinus pini and Fomitopsis pinicola. There was a difference between the fire-associated species and the non fire-associated species with respect to competitive strength after heat stress. All fire-associated species had an advantage after heat treatment, colonizing a larger volume of wood than any non-fire-associated competitor. Our findings suggest that increased heat tolerance of mycelia can exert a competitive balance shift after forest fire. It shows that a system governed by forest fire will be dominance controlled under certain conditions. Furthermore, from a management perspective, during a prescribed burning, certain species already present in the ecosystem will be favored if the fire is not allowed to totally consume the substrates.

  • 2.
    Fransson, Petra
    et al.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Uppsala BioCtr, Dept Forest Mycol & Plant Pathol, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Andersson, Alexandra
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Uppsala BioCtr, Dept Forest Mycol & Plant Pathol, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Norström, Sara
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences. Umeå Univ, Dept Chem, SE-90187 Umeå, Sweden.
    Bylund, Dan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Bent, Elizabeth
    Univ Guelph, Sch Environm Sci, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.
    Ectomycorrhizal exudates and pre-exposure to elevated CO2 affects soil bacterial growth and community structure2016In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 20, p. 211-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi produce low molecular weight organic compounds, supporting diverse microbial communities. To link mycorrhizal root exudation directly to bacterial responses, we used Scots pine exudates with (Suillus variegatus and Piloderma fallax) and without mycorrhiza as substrata for forest soil bacteria. Bacterial growth and vitality was monitored, and community composition determined using TRFLP, cloning and sequencing. We investigated if the amount of organic acids in exudates explained bacterial growth, and whether bacterial communities were influenced by pre-exposure to elevated atmospheric CO2. We demonstrated functional differences in bacterial growth rates related to CO2. There was a shift in the bacterial community (e.g. Burkholderia sp. and gamma-proteobacteria) toward organisms better able to rapidly utilize exudates when pine microcosms were pre-exposed to elevated CO2. Soil bacteria from all treatments tended to grow more abundantly and rapidly in exudates from Pilo derma -colonized seedlings, suggesting that the organic acids and/or unidentified compounds present supported greater growth.

  • 3.
    Ottosson, Elisabet
    et al.
    Uppsala Biocenter, Department of Forest Mycology and Plant Pathology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Nordén, Jenni
    Microbial Evolution Research Group, Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo, Norway.
    Dahlberg, Anders
    Uppsala Biocenter, Department of Forest Mycology and Plant Pathology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Edman, Mattias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Jönsson, Mari
    Swedish Species Information Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Larsson, Karl-Henrik
    Natural History Museum, University of Oslo, Norway.
    Olsson, Jörgen
    Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Penttillä, Reijo
    Finnish Forest Research Institute, Finland.
    Stenlid, Jan
    Uppsala Biocenter, Department of Forest Mycology and Plant Pathology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Ovaskainen, Otso
    Metapopulation Research Group, Department of Biosciences, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Species associations during the succession of wood-inhabiting fungal communities2014In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 11, p. 17-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied fungal succession in decaying wood by compiling time-series data of fruit body observations. We tested the hypothesis that the presence of a primary species affects the probability of a succeeding species occurring later on the same log. Significant associations were detected for 15 species pairs; these were consistent with earlier findings on cooccurrence patterns in single time surveys. We used enrichment analysis to test if species with particular life-history attributes were more often associated with the occurrence of a succeeding species, or vice versa. White rot fungi and fungi abundant as mycelia were more often associated with the occurrence of succeeding species, compared to brown rot fungi and species with low mycelial abundance. Our results indicate that certain primary species cause priority effects and non-random co-occurrence patterns in the field. These successional patterns are likely to be connected both with substrate modification and species interactions.

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