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  • 1.
    Fredman, Peter
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet, Fakulteten för humanvetenskap, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskap.
    Romild, Ulla
    Swedish National Institute of Public Health, Östersund 83140, Sweden.
    Yuan, Mike
    School of Outdoor Recreation, Parks and Tourism, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, ON P7B 5E1, Canada.
    Wolf-Watz, Daniel
    Mittuniversitetet, Fakulteten för humanvetenskap, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskap.
    Latent Demand and Time Contextual Constraints to Outdoor Recreation in Sweden2012Inngår i: Forests, ISSN 1999-4907, E-ISSN 1999-4907, Vol. 3, nr 1, s. 1-21Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyzes the latent demand to outdoor recreation participation and identifies what factors are constraining people from realizing thisdemand. In Sweden, recreation in the outdoors is seen as a public right as articulated in public policy and much of the outdoor recreation centre around forested landscapes-over 60 percent of the land area is classified as forest. Using data from a nationwide survey of 43 recreation activities, the study takes a time-contextual approach to reveal variations in recreation constraints across weekdays, weekends and holidays. Results show that almost half the population has a latent demand to increase their participation in outdoor recreation. Three categories of time contextualconstraints are identified and several of the constraints studied show variations across outdoor activities and socio-economic factors. Practical implications for the promotion of outdoor recreation participation by public agencies, recreation managers and tourism businesses are discussed based on the study findings. 

  • 2.
    Jonsson, Bengt-Gunnar
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet, Fakulteten för naturvetenskap, teknik och medier, Institutionen för naturvetenskap.
    Svensson, Johan
    SLU, Umeå.
    Mikusiński, Grzegorz
    SLU, Riddarhyttan/Skinnskatteberg.
    Manton, Michael
    Vytautas Magnus University, Akademija, Kaunas District, Lithuania.
    Angelstam, Per
    SLU, Skinnskatteberg.
    European Union's last intact forest landscapes are at a value chain crossroad between multiple use and intensified wood production2019Inngår i: Forests, ISSN 1999-4907, E-ISSN 1999-4907, Vol. 10, nr 7, artikkel-id 564Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Research Highlights: The European Union's last large intact forest landscapes along the Scandinavian Mountain range in Sweden offer unique opportunities for conservation of biodiversity, ecological integrity and resilience. However, these forests are at a crossroad between intensified wood production aimed at bio-economy, and rural development based on multi-functional forest landscapes for future-oriented forest value chains. Background and Objectives:We (1) estimate the area of near-natural forests potentially remaining for forest harvesting and wood production, or as green infrastructure for biodiversity conservation and human well-being in rural areas, (2) review how forest and conservation policies have so far succeeded to reduce the loss of mountain forests, and (3) discuss what economic, socio-cultural and ecological values that are at stake, as well as different governance and management solutions.Materials andMethods: First, we estimated the remaining amount of intact mountain forests using (1) the Swedish National Forest Inventory, (2) protected area statistics, (3) forest harvest permit applications and actually harvested forests, (4) remote sensing wall-to-wall data on forests not subject to clear-felling since the mid-1950s, (5) mapping of productive and non-productive forestland, and (6) estimates of mean annual final felling rate. Second, we review policy documents related to the emergence of land use regulation in north Sweden, including the mountain forest border, and illustrate this with an actual case that has had significant policy implementation importance. Results: There is a clear difference between the proportions of formally protected productive forestland above the mountain forest border (52.5%) and north Sweden in general (6.3%). A total of 300,000 ha of previously not clear-felled mountain forest outside protected areas remain, which can support novel value chains that are not achievable elsewhere. Conclusions: The mountain forests in Sweden provide unique conservation values in the European Union. Since the beginning of the 1990s, policy regulations have been successful in limiting forest harvesting. Currently, however, mountain forests are a battle ground regarding intensification of forest use, including logging of forests that have never been subject to clear-felling systems vs. nature conservation and wilderness as a base for rural development. The ability of mountain municipalities to encourage sustainable rural forest landscapes must be strengthened. 

  • 3.
    Lundmark, Tomas
    et al.
    Department of Forest Ecology and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU).
    Bergh, Johan
    Swedish Forest Research Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Hofer, Peter
    GEO Partner AG.
    Lundström, Anders
    Department of Forest Resource Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU).
    Nordin, Annika
    Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences .
    Poudel, Bishnu Chandra
    Mittuniversitetet, Fakulteten för naturvetenskap, teknik och medier, Avdelningen för ekoteknik och hållbart byggande. Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences.
    Sathre, Roger
    Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.
    Taverna, Ruedi
    GEO Partner AG.
    Werner, Frank
    Werner Environment & Development.
    Potential Roles of Swedish Forestry in the Context of Climate Change Mitigation2014Inngår i: Forests, ISSN 1999-4907, E-ISSN 1999-4907, Vol. 5, nr 4, s. 557-578Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, where forests cover more than 60% of the land area, silviculture and the use of forest products by industry and society play crucial roles in the national carbon balance. A scientific challenge is to understand how different forest management and wood use strategies can best contribute to climate change mitigation benefits. This study uses a set of models to analyze the effects of different forest management and wood use strategies in Sweden on carbon dioxide emissions and removals through 2105. If the present Swedish forest use strategy is continued, the long-term climate change mitigation benefit will correspond to more than 60 million tons of avoided or reduced emissions of carbon dioxide annually, compared to a scenario with similar consumption patterns in society but where non-renewable products are used instead of forest-based products. On average about 470 kg of carbon dioxide emissions are avoided for each cubic meter of biomass harvested, after accounting for carbon stock changes, substitution effects and all emissions related to forest management and industrial processes. Due to Sweden’s large export share of forest-based products, the climate change mitigation effect of Swedish forestry is larger abroad than within the country. The study also shows that silvicultural methods to increase forest biomass production can further reduce net carbon dioxide emissions by an additional 40 million tons of per year. Forestry’s contribution to climate change mitigation could be significantly increased if management of the boreal forest were oriented towards increased biomass production and if more wood were used to substitute fossil fuels and energy-intensive materials.

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