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  • 1.
    Dauvrin, M.
    et al.
    Institute of Health and Society IRSS, Université Catholique de Louvain, Clos Chapelle aux Champs 30 B1.30.15, 1200 Bruxelles, Belgium.
    Lorant, V
    Institute of Health and Society IRSS, Université Catholique de Louvain, Clos Chapelle aux Champs 30 B1.30.15, 1200 Bruxelles, Belgium.
    Sandhu, S
    Unit for Social and Community Psychiatry, London and the Barts School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London E13 8SP, United Kingdom.
    Devillé, W
    International and Migrant Health, NIVEL (Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research), Otterstraat 118-124, 3500, BN Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Dia, H
    Etablissement Public de Santé Maison Blanche, 3-5 rue Lespagnol, 75020 Paris, France.
    Dias, S
    Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Rua da Junqueira, 96, 1349-008, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Gaddini, A
    Laziosanit ASP Public Health Agency for the Lazio Region, Via S. Costanza 53, 00185 Rome, Italy.
    Ioannidis, E
    Department of Sociology, National School of Public Health, 196 Alexandras avenue, Athens 11521, Greece.
    Jensen, N
    Department of Public Health, Danish Research Centre for Migration, Ethnicity and Health (MESU), University of Copenhagen, Oster Farimagsgade 5, DK-1014 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kluge, U
    Clinic for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medicine Berlin, CCM, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin, Germany.
    Mertaniemi, R
    Department for Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), P.O.B. 30, FIN-00271 Helsinki, Finland.
    Puigpinás I Riera, R
    Agency of Public Health of Barcelona, Pça. Lesseps, 1, 08023 Barcelona, Spain.
    Sárváry, A
    Faculty of Health, University of Debrecen, Sástái út 2-4, 4400 Nyíregyháza, Hungary.
    Stramayr, C
    Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Social Psychiatry, Lazarettgasse 14A-912, 1090 Vienna, Austria.
    Stankunas, M
    Department of Health Management, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, A. Mickeviciaus 9, Kaunas 44307, Lithuania.
    Soares, Joaquim J. F.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Welbel, M
    Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology, Ul. Sobieskiego 9, 02-957 Warsaw, Poland.
    Priebe, S
    Unit for Social and Community Psychiatry, London and the Barts School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London E13 8SP, United Kingdom.
    Health care for irregular migrants: Pragmatism across Europe. A qualitative study2012In: BMC Research Notes, ISSN 1756-0500, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 5, p. Art. no. 99-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract. Background: Health services in Europe face the challenge of delivering care to a heterogeneous group of irregular migrants (IM). There is little empirical evidence on how health professionals cope with this challenge. This study explores the experiences of health professionals providing care to IM in three types of health care service across 16 European countries. Results: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with health professionals in 144 primary care services, 48 mental health services, and 48 Accident & Emergency departments (total n = 240). Although legal health care entitlement for IM varies across countries, health professionals reported facing similar issues when caring for IM. These issues include access problems, limited communication, and associated legal complications. Differences in the experiences with IM across the three types of services were also explored. Respondents from Accident & Emergency departments reported less of a difference between the care for IM patients and patients in a regular situation than did respondents from primary care and mental health services. Primary care services and mental health services were more concerned with language barriers than Accident & Emergency departments. Notifying the authorities was an uncommon practice, even in countries where health professionals are required to do this. Conclusions: The needs of IM patients and the values of the staff appear to be as important as the national legal framework, with staff in different European countries adopting a similar pragmatic approach to delivering health care to IM. While legislation might help to improve health care for IM, more appropriate organisation and local flexibility are equally important, especially for improving access and care pathways. © 2012 Dauvrin et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  • 2. Freyhult, E
    et al.
    Edvardsson, Sverker
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics.
    Tamas, I
    Moulton, Vincent
    Poole, AM
    Fisher: a program for the detection of H/ACA snoRNAs using MFE secondary structure prediction and comparative genomics - assessment and update2008In: BMC Research Notes, ISSN 1756-0500, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 1, no 49, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundThe H/ACA family of small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) plays a central role in guiding the pseudouridylation of ribosomal RNA (rRNA). In an effort to systematically identify the complete set of rRNA-modifying H/ACA snoRNAs from the genome sequence of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we developed a program - Fisher - and previously presented several candidate snoRNAs based on our analysis [1].

     

    FindingsIn this report, we provide a brief update of this work, which was aborted after the publication of experimentally-identified snoRNAs [2] identical to candidates we had identified bioinformatically using Fisher. Our motivation for revisiting this work is to report on the status of the candidate snoRNAs described in [1], and secondly, to report that a modified version of Fisher together with the available multiple yeast genome sequences was able to correctly identify several H/ACA snoRNAs for modification sites not identified by the snoGPS program [3]. While we are no longer developing Fisher, we briefly consider the merits of the Fisher algorithm relative to snoGPS, which may be of use for workers considering pursuing a similar search strategy for the identification of small RNAs. The modified source code for Fisher is made available as supplementary material.

     

    ConclusionOur results confirm the validity of using minimum free energy (MFE) secondary structure prediction to guide comparative genomic screening for RNA families with few sequence constraints.

     

  • 3.
    Guldbrandsson, K.
    et al.
    Swedish National Institute of Public Health, Östersund, Sweden.
    Nordvik, Monica K.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Bremberg, S.
    Swedish National Institute of Public Health, Östersund, Sweden.
    Identification of potential opinion leaders in child health promotion in Sweden using network analysis2012In: BMC Research Notes, ISSN 1756-0500, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 5, p. Art. no. 424-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Opinion leaders are often local individuals with high credibility who can influence other people. Robust effects using opinion leaders in diffusing innovations have been shown in several randomized controlled trials, for example regarding sexually transmitted infections (STI), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention, mammography rates and caesarean birth delivery rates. In a Cochrane review 2010 it was concluded that the use of opinion leaders can successfully promote evidence-based practice. Thus, using opinion leaders within the public health sector might be one means to speed up the dissemination of health promoting and disease preventing innovations. Social network analysis has been used to trace and map networks, with focus on relationships and positions, in widely spread arenas and topics. The purpose of this study was to use social network analysis in order to identify potential opinion leaders at the arena of child health promotion in Sweden. Results: By using snowball technique a short e-mail question was spread in up to five links, starting from seven initially invited persons. This inquiry resulted in a network consisting of 153 individuals. The most often mentioned actors were researchers, public health officials and paediatricians, or a combination of these professions. Four single individuals were mentioned by five to seven other persons in the network. These individuals obviously possess qualities that make other professionals within the public health sector listen to and trust them. Conclusions: Social network analysis seemed to be a useful method to identify influential persons with high credibility, i.e. potential opinion leaders, at the arena of child health promotion in Sweden. If genuine opinion leaders could be identified directed measures can be carried out in order to spread new and relevant knowledge. This may facilitate for public health actors at the local, regional and national level to more rapidly progress innovations into everyday practice. However, effectiveness studies of opinion leaders in the public health sector still have to be performed. © 2012 Guldbrandsson et al.

  • 4.
    Sjöling, Mats
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Kristina
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Englund, Erling
    Research and Development Centre, County Council of Västernorrland, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Westman, Anton
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Section of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Jong, Miek C
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Effectiveness of motivational interviewing and physical activity on prescription on leisure exercise time in subjects suffering from mild to moderate hypertension2011In: BMC Research Notes, ISSN 1756-0500, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 4, p. Art. no. 352-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:Physical inactivity is considered to be the strongest individual risk factor for poor health in Sweden. It has been shown that increased physical activity can reduce hypertension and the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases. The objective of the present pilot study was to investigate whether a combination of Motivational Interviewing (MI) and Physical Activity on Prescription (PAP) would increase leisure exercise time and subsequently improve health-related variables.METHODS:This pilot study was of a repeated measures design, with a 15 months intervention in 31 patients with mild to moderate hypertension. Primary outcome parameter was leisure exercise time and secondary outcome parameters were changes in blood pressure, Body Mass Index (BMI), waist circumference, lipid status, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). Assessments of the outcome parameters were made at baseline and after 3, 9 and 15 months. RESULTS:Leisure exercise time improved significantly from <60 min/week at baseline to a mean activity level of 300 (+/- 165) minutes/week at 15 months follow up. Furthermore, statistically significant improvements (p<0.05) were observed in systolic (-14,5 +/- 8.3 mmHg) and diastolic blood pressure (-5,1 +/- 5.8 mmHg), heart rate (-4.9 +/- 8.7 beats/min, weight (-1.2 +/- 3.4 kg) BMI -0.6 +/- 1.2 kg/m2), waist circumference (-3.5 +/- 4.1 cm) as well as in VO2max (2.94 +/- 3.8 ml/kg and 0.23, +/- 0.34 lit/min) upon intervention as compared to baseline. CONCLUSIONS:A 15 month intervention period with MI, in combination with PAP, significantly increased leisure exercise time and improved health-related variables in hypertensive patients. This outcome warrants further research to investigate the efficacy of MI and PAP in the treatment of mild to moderate hypertension.

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