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  • 1.
    Gidlund, Ulrika
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Education.
    Teachers’ attitudes towards including students with emotional and behavioural difficulties in mainstream school: A systematic research synthesis2018In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, ISSN 1694-2493, E-ISSN 1694-2116, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 45-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research reviews on teachers'attitudes towards inclusive education have shown that students'types of special educational needs influences teachers'attitudes; these reviews have also indicated that, in terms of the inclusion of various groups, teachers are most negative about including students with behavioural problems. This article is a review of the research on teachers'attitudes towards inclusion with regard to students who have special educational needs. It specifically identifies evidence regarding teachers'attitudes towards the inclusion of students with emotional and behavioural difficulty (EBD). For this review, 15 studies, measuring teachers'attitudes from 15 countries, met the inclusion criteria. The results of this synthesis confirmed that most teachers hold negative attitudes towards the inclusion of students with EBD; however, this was not true in all countries. The results also highlight specific explanations for why teachers hold negative attitudes towards including students with EBD in their classrooms. The implication of this synthesis is that teachers feel that their prerequisites for successfully including students with EBD are not being met; this impracticability is most impactful when the teachers nevertheless try to include these students. 

  • 2.
    Ivarsson, Lena
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Education.
    What’s in it for me? - Peer observation of teaching: Experiences from a primary school in Sweden2019In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, ISSN 1694-2493, E-ISSN 1694-2116, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 128-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Peer observations of teaching, POT, is a model for developing teachers to reflect on their teaching practice and discuss their ideas with colleagues. This article contributes to the knowledge of how peer observation of teaching can be used in a primary school as a model to develop teachers’ teaching practices, and highlights the challenges throughout the process. Semi-structured interviews were used for data collection and analyzed by a qualitative content analysis with a deductive approach. The results of the study confirm that peer observation of teaching is, in fact, a useful model for metacognitive improvement of teaching and learning for teachers, provided that some necessary conditions are met, for example transparency in the planning of the process, inclusion of teachers in the decision-making process, and training in the process of providing and receiving feedback.

  • 3.
    Malm, Birgitte
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Education.
    "It's All about Relationships": Enhancing Authentic Learning Processes in Teacher Education2018In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, ISSN 1694-2493, E-ISSN 1694-2116, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 48-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, the significance and consequences of enhancing authentic learning processes within undergraduate teacher education are discussed, inspired by American (liberal arts) contemporary practices. Liberal education can be defined as a higher education that is a cultivation of the whole human being for the functions of citizenship and life in general. In essence, a successful liberal arts programme will be characterized by close student-faculty relationships, small classes, excellent teaching, individual instruction, empathetic advising and personal attention. Nineteen faculty members at a liberal arts college were interviewed about their understanding and experiences of what a liberal arts education entails, how they perceive of the relationship between teaching and research and what in their daily work motivates them. Sentiments expressed included over-commitment and a heavy workload, as well as professional autonomy, meaningful engagement and profound caring and concern for students. Results emphasize the need to reflect on how undergraduate programmes should or need to be constructed and implemented - taking into account the importance of dialogue, feedback and reflection - if the aim is to create competent democratic citizens to be scholars and leaders of the future. 

  • 4.
    Malm, Birgitte
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Education.
    "We Need to Give the Profession Something that No One Else Can": Swedish Student Teachers' Perceptions and Experiences of their Preschool Teacher Training Programme2017In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, ISSN 1694-2493, E-ISSN 1694-2116, Vol. 16, no 9, p. 73-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current research points towards preschool and qualitative pedagogical relationships as being determined and formed by a close link between care and teaching. An Early Childhood Education should lead not only towards the acquisition of knowledge within specific areas but should also enhance the  personal development of student teachers. New and creative competences need to be developed to cope with increasingly complex, changing and diversified learning environments. The crucial questions are: How well does contemporary Teacher Education prepare student teachers for their future role? Do students feel that their teacher-training programme has sufficiently prepared them for their profession? This study comprises Swedish student teachers’ perceptions and experiences of their Early Childhood Education. Data is based on 181 written evaluations by final year student teachers. Results are discussed using a theoretical framework based on the sociological concept of an “educational contract” comprising three different levels of negotiation: students’ education and their current workforce; students and their teacher training programme; students, teachers and learning in any given educational situation

  • 5.
    Randevåg, Lena
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Education.
    Boström, Lena
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Education.
    Completing studies in alternative ways in adult education. ‘Who has told me that I cannot ...?’2019In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, ISSN 1694-2493, E-ISSN 1694-2116, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 165-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Every fourth young adult in Sweden leaves upper secondary school without complete grades (Statistiska Centralbyrån, 2017). These young adults without a diploma are at risk of being marginalized (Hugo, 2007; Lundahl et al. 2015). Therefore, all attempts to support these students’ needs using alternative methods to help them complete their studies are of great importance for both society and the individuals. With this study, we aim to shed light on how participants with different functional variations and overall unfavourable school experiences in a project-based alternative study program in upper secondary education perceive the factors of success. Moreover, we want to understand the project’s outcome based on contextual factors. To do this, we use an abductive content analysis of project documents, field notes, and interviews with five students. Our analysis follows three steps. Firstly, we identify three major themes expressed by the participants as success factors concerning ways to attend and complete their secondary education. Secondly, we identify how contextual factors can explain the project’s outcome. Finally, we draw conclusions on how motivation theory, motivation strategies, and factors in the learning environment can explain the project’s outcome. The overall conclusions are (a) students in this target group need to participate in negotiations concerning their adaptation in their studies, (b) a symmetrical interpersonal relationship between teachers and students is a necessity, and (c) beneficial learning environments are essential for these students’ learning. 

  • 6.
    Åhslund, Ingela
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Education.
    Boström, Lena
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Education.
    Teachers’ Perceptions of Gender Differences: What about Boys and Girls in the Classroom?2018In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, ISSN 1694-2493, E-ISSN 1694-2116, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 28-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe how primary school teachers perceive differences in behaviour and learning between boys and girls in relation to their teaching and methods. A quantitative approach was used in this study, and the analysis was built on descriptive statistics and bivariate correlations. The results show that the teachers had a positive view of their teaching. However, they generally had low expectations of the boys. The teachers also perceived that they made a great effort to adapt the teaching according to the students' prerequisites and needs. Individual work was a frequently used teaching method, although this was perceived as unfavorable for the boys’ learning. The boys’ behaviours were perceived as negative for learning, the boys were described as dependent, idle, and unmotivated. Negative characteristics might affect the teachers’ expectations of high learning outcomes, and may ultimately affect the boys’ school performances. The result of this study emphasizes the importance of that teachers reflect on their teaching methods in relation to boys, and girls’ prerequisites in the classroom.

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